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Saab
30th November 2011, 11:37
The volvos are used by Regional Support Units, the get about the only proper police spec vehicles in the country.

I am always intrigued when I see some thing like this.

What does "police spec" or "military spec" vehicle actually mean.

I can understand vehicles being speced for various tasks, like ballistic protection etc. but I just find these terms are trotted out to baffle people with bull shyte.

Is there a proper spec sheet that is entitled "police Spec" or "minimum standard for military vehicles"

From tonyrdf's spot one would assume that we should stop saying was saw a Fiesta Garda car as its not to police spec and so it is not a Garda car but just a car used by the Garda.

This very issue has occured in my job. An item was not to commercial spec and our HACCP paperwork had to reflect this.

Docman
30th November 2011, 12:40
Is there a proper spec sheet that is entitled "police Spec" or "minimum standard for military vehicles"

The Military ones usually revolve around STANAGs
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STANAG

ie Vehicle Ballistic protection is based around STANAG 4569
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STANAG_4569

Wicklaman
30th November 2011, 19:01
The Military ones usually revolve around STANAGs
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STANAG

I'd seen 'STANAG' about M16-compatible rifle magazines, but didn't realise there was a whole lot more of them. Thanks for that!

Goldie fish
30th November 2011, 21:28
Police spec is a car fitted with uprated suspension and electrics to cope with lights and siren/radio harness, and equipped to drive safely above the speed limit.
Also many are fitted with weapons vaults. BMW and Volvo do this at the factory. The car comes out of the production line ready to accept locally used radio and siren, with switchgear adapted into the standard controls.
All the GS need to do on delivery is stick a yellow stripe and "garda" signs on the roof and door.
It is not a modified family saloon, with the cd player ripped out and replaced with a Garda radio..

danno
30th November 2011, 21:36
On the Range Rover site there is a page re armoured specs for VIPs etc giving the standard of survivability/protection offered.

GoneToTheCanner
1st December 2011, 10:46
Think of those FFRs, using a voltage that no standard road car or 4x4 uses, because of the need to provide the corect voltage for radio sets. Also, aircraft for European military use have to be able to use standard NATO fuels/oils/lubricants,etc,etc and most civilian aircraft can do the same. It's all about setting a basic level that everyone has to reach, same as food hygiene standards or pharma standards and so on.

regards
GttC

Saab
1st December 2011, 22:40
From this I get army spec is about conforming to NATO standards to allow interoperability.

So really we shoud say NATO spec or STANAG as opposed to military specs.

Don't most large vehicles use 24v?

Docman
2nd December 2011, 01:42
From this I get army spec is about conforming to NATO standards to allow interoperability.

So really we shoud say NATO spec or STANAG as opposed to military specs.

There are different Military Specs - The DF work according the NATO STANAGs most of the time but there are others. The old Warsaw Pact had another which is still used in some parts of the world and I'm sure the Chinese have another - it depends on who you are dealing with an the Spec they require.

GoneToTheCanner
2nd December 2011, 10:18
@saab, When I say FFRs, I mean Landrover-size, which are usually 12 volt in civvie service and can't generate enough power for military radios. i don't know what voltage trucks like 3-tonners use. Also, such specifications that NATO might issue have to cover the widely varying standards of many countries, as well as different standards for winter and summer, desert and temperate, maritime, aviation, industrial and so on. Sometimes, NATO and Russian/Warsaw Pact/Chinese standards match and sometimes they don't, so they are not always compatible. For example, a grease designed for lubricating Western European standard car axles down to , say, -15 deg C would freeze solid under Russian conditions in Siberia, so a stronger severe winter standard grease would have to be specified before you could operate there. As a home example, an air filter on a Mowag in Chad would have to be designed to cope with desert conditions or be required to be serviced to more stringent conditions than in a temperate day in the Curragh. Setting standards also means that you can stop suppliers fobbing you off with ropey shit.

regards
GttC

Saab
3rd December 2011, 23:46
GttC

Most car manuals have a section on them.

Mowags are just like many machines, there is a manual that tells you the best way to operate the machine.

Now I could hardly say that the section in out manuals that tell us what oil to use as "meat factory specs"

This is exactly the reason I posed the question.

24v is a recommended voltage for vehicles with high power use. Nothing to do with military use just something that vehicle manufacturers decided for some reason.

GoneToTheCanner
4th December 2011, 19:26
Even "meat factory specs", if properly observed are high-quality. Proper food-grade refrigeration or food-grade steel work surfaces, as an example. For another example, try and get your hands on a Shell specifications manual, which covers every oil and lubricant made by them. It's literally a world-standard book, as it has millions of applications for it's products, so, if you needed to find oil for an industrial compressor, you'd be pointed in the direction of Tellus Oil. Now, if that compressor was in a marine environment, say on the deck of a supply boat, then you might get directed to Tellus Marine Oil. Some products cross technologies, so a light oil suitable for a compressor might also be suitable for an outboard motor or a static fire pump or a car gearbox.

regards
GttC

tonyrdf
6th December 2011, 00:59
I am always intrigued when I see some thing like this.

What does "police spec" or "military spec" vehicle actually mean.

I can understand vehicles being speced for various tasks, like ballistic protection etc. but I just find these terms are trotted out to baffle people with bull shyte.

Is there a proper spec sheet that is entitled "police Spec" or "minimum standard for military vehicles"

From tonyrdf's spot one would assume that we should stop saying was saw a Fiesta Garda car as its not to police spec and so it is not a Garda car but just a car used by the Garda.

This very issue has occured in my job. An item was not to commercial spec and our HACCP paperwork had to reflect this.

As Goldie said, a "police spec" vehicle has an uprated engine, strengthened suspension, sump guard for rough roads, ESP, it has the highest quality tires and is generally suited to driving at speed. It would also have ramming protection and the highest NACCP safety rating.The Volvo XC70's have all the above.

Those Volvos were also wired at the factory for there lighting systems and the lightbar would have been picked so as to limit drag. They have secure gun lockers and proper drawers for other equipment. The interior has kick protection to stop a prisoner in the back kicking a driver. They even have little recharging docks for rechargeable torches. The also have spots and have blue/red led lights stuck in every nook and cranny making them light up like a Christmas tree at the Roadside.

The cars regular Gardai use are taken from the dealer and have whichever light bar comes to hand plonked on top. The tiny boots are filled with signs/cones/mepro lights etc. As Goldie then said the Radio is then yanked out and the Garda Radio is installed. A reflective stripe is the thrown on and off you go.

http://www.google.ie/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=volvo%20police%20spec%20vehicles&source=web&cd=4&ved=0CDoQFjAD&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.volvoclub.org.uk%2Fpdf%2Fbroc hures%2FPoliceCarRangeBrochureUK2002.pdf&ei=cmndToHpMISXhQevqJWZBQ&usg=AFQjCNG-DQb7Ufvlurm3mw5ZMMR5HmkFHw&cad=rja