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sledger
27th September 2004, 23:52
Maritime college will chart a new course
Irish Times
27/09/2004
Lorna Siggins, Marine Correspondent

Emergency helicopter evacuation in storm conditions, survival craft techniques and how to handle a variety of ships are among the skills which the State's first dedicated maritime college will be equipped to teach from next month.

The €51 million National Maritime College of Ireland (NMCI) is due to open its doors on October 11th at Ringaskiddy in Cork harbour. However, Cork Institute of Technology (CIT) nautical students have already been working at the new building, which was built under a public-private partnership (PPP) initiative sponsored by the Department of Education and Science.

The college will meet the training requirements of both the merchant marine and Naval Service as part of a unique co-operative venture. The initiative dates back to the 1980s, when the Naval Service left Spike Island and moved its training school there to premises at Haulbowline and at Murphy Barracks in Ballincollig, Co Cork.

The split proved operationally difficult, and in 1993 a 10-acre site was acquired on reclaimed land at Ringaskiddy, close to the naval base, by the Department of Defence. The site was earmarked for a maritime school, but the impetus for a joint venture with the CIT was provided by new international requirements on training and certification of seafarers in 1995.

In 1999, an inter-departmental working group under the Department of the Marine looked at the viability of a joint approach. The then minister for the marine, Dr Michael Woods, transferred to the Department of Education and gave renewed impetus to the plans. The contract for the first third-level PPP was signed by the current Minister for Education, Mr Noel Dempsey, in February of last year.

Degrees in marine engineering and nautical science are on this year's curriculum, along with certificates in navigational studies and competency for professional seafarers. The 14,000-square-metre building can accommodate 750 full-time students, and houses a deep pool for survival training, a helicopter "dunker" to simulate emergency conditions, a cold-water training tank and a marine escape system.

The audiovisual and "weather" generating equipment in the survival pool can simulate storm force Atlantic conditions, complete with thunder and lightning, and is the first of its type on this island. The college is also equipped with a fire and damage control centre for firefighting, and a jetty with elevated survival craft.

Norwegian-designed simulators range from the 360-degree visual bridge on a merchant ship to the 270-degree bridge of a Naval Service patrol vessel and three auxiliary bridges with 150-degree views. In all, the software provides for 32 models of bridge.

On the merchant ship bridge, a student can take a vessel into Cork harbour, in a realistic sea swell, and cope with various simulated hazards.

The building also has engineering workshops, an engine room, training rooms for electronics and related equipment, and research laboratory space. The college plans to provide training for the offshore industry in safety and survival and courses in the marine leisure sector.

The college's staff complement will be 60, drawn from CIT and the Naval Service. It will also have the State's first third-level maritime library, according to Mr Michael Delaney, CIT's head of development at the new college, who has been working in partnership with Mr Donal Burke of CIT's Department of Nautical Studies and Cdr Tom Tuohy of the Naval Service to meet the October deadline.

Goldie fish
28th September 2004, 01:31
give us a chance willye!.

Goldie fish
28th September 2004, 01:36
More details
http://www.careersatsea.ie/NMCI_v2.ppt

Stoker
28th September 2004, 04:13
Great to see the new college up and running, are they going to hold an open day?

Goldie fish
28th September 2004, 06:05
Sure Hope so...
I'll be there if they do!

Goldie fish
3rd April 2005, 03:41
On Saturday week, April 9, there will be an OPEN DAY at the National Maritime College in Ringaskiddy, the first opportunity for the public to tour the College and "Explore Life At Sea." This is being run by the Cork City Development Board as part of the CORK LIFELONG LEARNING FESTIVAL. The College will be open from noon to 4pm, numbers are restricted on the College tours, so if you want to book a place - phone Cork 4970600.

From Seascapes (http://www.rte.ie/radio1/story/1043106.html)

Goldie fish
7th April 2005, 19:28
If anyone is interested in visiting this establishment on Saturday,there are very few slots available. I have 1500hrs booked for myself and 2 others,but this is provisional,and can be increased or decreased before close of business tomorrow.



This rare opportunity should not be missed. The facilities in this college are quite impressive.

Goldie fish
8th April 2005, 17:11
There is still a place(1) available if you are interested in visiting the college. Contact me by PM anytime in the next 15 hours(I'll be online) if you are interested.

sparky
11th April 2005, 18:31
i did a course in the NMCI last year and we got a full tour of the facilities and i have to say i was very impressed they turned on the bridge simulator and i was swaying from side to side to conteract the imaginery rolls caused from looking at the screens

moggy
11th April 2005, 20:01
Any Reports On Open Day??

Goldie fish
23rd April 2005, 17:44
Any Reports On Open Day??

Yes,Apologies for the delay,been busy at work for a change,have not had the chance to upload the photos till now.

http://a0.cpimg.com/image/BA/CC/47185850-407f-02000180-.jpg

Tours were given to the public as advertised above,but i had to ask,why would anyone bring along a child under 10 to such a facility? What could they hope to gain from doing so? One man in particular,spent most of the time wandering around trying to calm his one year old child...go figure...

Anyway,The tour as such brought us around the various workshops and simulators,With the increased use of unmanned engineering spaces,the concentration seemed to be on engineering simulators,for engine control rooms and a simulated engine room(with relatively small engines,but all the other equipment found in a ships engine room)

http://a8.cpimg.com/image/00/BD/47185408-d4ba-02000180-.jpg
http://a1.cpimg.com/image/03/BE/47185411-f135-02000180-.jpg

The next feature the college can be justifiably proud of is the pool. I won't call it a swimming pool because swimming will be the least of your worries. It has a 2.5m shallow end,a 5m deep end, and a 10m dive tank(for the training of Naval divers). The pool is normally used for survival training,and comes with wind and rain,as well as thunder and lightning. Around its edge was a number of types of inflatable liferaft,and the equipment they would usualy carry.
Also a feature of this pool is a dunking module,which would be used to train helicopter crews in the procedure of exiting a helicopter which has ditched at sea and inverted itself. In the past crews had to go to the UK to complete training on this.
http://a4.cpimg.com/image/06/BE/47185414-5836-02000180-.jpg
http://a5.cpimg.com/image/07/BE/47185415-17e0-02000180-.jpg
The weather simulator was demonstrated(very impressive) but docman didnt feel He got wet enough,so I offered to push him into the pool...
http://a7.cpimg.com/image/09/BE/47185417-fda7-02000180-.jpg

We seemed to avoid many of the more interesting rooms,which seemed to be for Naval use only(shame)

The Chartroom,which has an almost 360degree view of the harbour is impressive,and possibly more distracting than inspiring to potential sefarers
http://a8.cpimg.com/image/04/C6/47185668-bbf9-02000180-.jpg
http://a8.cpimg.com/image/0E/C6/47185678-363b-02000180-.jpg

Goldie fish
23rd April 2005, 17:52
Hilight of the day though had to be the 360degree bridge simulator. As mentioned above,as soon as it was switched on,i found myself moving with the waves,even if the simulator itself is firmly planted on the ground. Words cannot describe the experience,nor photos either...Its just like being on a real ship,without the smell....

Here goes anyway.
http://a9.cpimg.com/image/0F/C6/47185679-f174-02000180-.jpg
http://a0.cpimg.com/image/10/C6/47185680-1117-02000180-.jpg
http://a9.cpimg.com/image/B9/CC/47185849-4159-02000180-.jpg

Laners
23rd April 2005, 18:34
Very impressive . I notice the view of the Naval Base in one of the photos and was curious about the newer looking building to the left of the main billets and am I wrong or is the N C O s mess gone / new location

Goldie fish
23rd April 2005, 18:36
Thats probably the Dining hall you are looking at. NCOs mess is still there...on the way up to the square?

Bosco
23rd April 2005, 18:52
Cool. As far as I know another mate of mine is down there.

Laners
23rd April 2005, 19:01
Thats probably the Dining hall you are looking at. NCOs mess is still there...on the way up to the square?
Still a bit confused, the dining hall use to be to the right of the billets as you look at the photo and the N C O s mess was a small two story building on the left which i can not see in the photo

hptmurphy
24th April 2005, 21:37
The NCOs mess is still to the right of the old billets has been completely rebuilt.

The dining hall (ratings) was never known as a dining hall and always 'the galley' has also been rebuilt from scratch. the old billets can not be rebuilt as I belev that they are classified as a listed building. The two messes are in the same positions just completely new buildings.

Sluggie
24th April 2005, 23:01
Laners,

The building you refer to is in fact two buildings. In the foreground is the old (Refurbished) NCOs mess. Behind this is the new roof of the Gym. It just loos like one unusual building. The new Galley/Dining hall is built on the site of the old galley plus some reclaimed land. Only the western edge of this very impressive building is visiblein the photo.

Stoker
25th April 2005, 00:01
I wonder does the Bridge simulator use recorded vidio or computer generated images ?
the ship in the photo is the Ulysses, which to my knowledge has never been in Cork!

Laners
25th April 2005, 00:34
Thanks Murph and Sluggie , I can see the N C O s mess now , it looked like it was part of the gym , and how is that new galley , when I was there it was just a ballhop .

Goldie fish
25th April 2005, 02:05
The images are computer generated. If you think thats bad,you should see the airplane landing on her deck....(anything is possible in this simulated world...

Stoker
25th April 2005, 19:08
Well, thats almost possible, Dk. 11 the Bridge deck is designed to allow a Sikorsky 61N to land on. It is fitted with landing lights etc, I don't know if a chopper has ever tryed. A few years ago the RAF used to land a man almost every afternoon on the Ferry out of Pembroke, but when the Ferry Norona had to evacuate some passengers following a fire outside Milford Haven, the Airman would not lift off the passengers until the ensign staff had been removed, needless to say the bolts were rusted solid but a hacksaw with a good blade was soon found.

hptmurphy
25th April 2005, 21:55
laners when you were in the navy its entire future was a ballhop!

moggy
26th April 2005, 19:59
laners you are due a severe trip to the base, major changes since you were there
what year did u leave, oh by the way the ballhops are still flying??

Goldie fish
9th December 2006, 12:53
<object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/n6nOEUDNhvM"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/n6nOEUDNhvM" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="350"></embed></object>

A movie of the sim in action

<object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/55F0rrdeEME"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/55F0rrdeEME" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="350"></embed></object>
The pool

Apologies for sound quality.

Goldie fish
17th July 2010, 17:17
http://www.merc3.ie/pages/news/July2010_PRTLI.htm