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mutter nutter
26th March 2005, 13:07
The Air Corp is to buy 2 tiny unmanned aerial vehicles for 300,000 Euros, commonly known as drones which can fly over sensitive areas and relay film back to technician's on the ground to reduce the risk of ambushes before troops are sent in
From Today's Independent page 10

sledger
27th March 2005, 11:45
Robot plane to be used by Irish forces
Sunday Independent
27/03/2005
DON LAVERY
A KEY weapon in Afghanistan and Iraq, an unmanned 'spy in the sky' robot plane, is to be used in Ireland.
The pilotless drones, called unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), have proved a vital element in surveillance of high risk areas by US, British and German forces in the two countries and in Bosnia.
They can be operated by a pilot thousands of miles away from a war zone giving commanders an unrivalled view of the battlefield.
Now two UAVs are to be acquired by the Irish Air Corps under an initial €300,000 programme and could be used to support anti-terrorist operations by Ireland's Special Forces, the Army Ranger Wing. They may also be used abroad on peace missions like Liberia allowing Irish commanders to see real time video footage by day or night from the drone operating far ahead of their patrolling troops.
One UAV, the American Predator, has been armed with missiles and was used to attack terrorist strongholds in Fallujah in Iraq. But the Irish UAVs will be smaller and simpler, to be used for roles which could include Border and sea surveillance; spotting for artillery fire, or acting in support of the Rangers.

andy
27th March 2005, 13:38
great news. Should be useful enough. Is 2 enough ?

FMolloy
27th March 2005, 14:41
Two is definitely not enough, but it's a good starting point.

Aidan
27th March 2005, 15:52
Does anyone have any idea what specific aircraft have been selected?

For €300k you can forget about anything like the Predator or the Elbit Hermes 450. The Hermes 180 is more likely but probably stretching the budget also.

andy
27th March 2005, 15:58
They are pretty cheap at €150,000 a pop so if they got 6 or 7 of them it would be a great asset for the AC. I wasnt overally surprised when i read the article. I always thought the AC would move towards UAV's. Its right up our street.

http://www.airforce-technology.com/projects/predator/images/predator2.jpg

They should prove very benefical to the commander on the ground even if they are hacked down versions of the predator.

http://www.airforce-technology.com/projects/predator/

mutter nutter
27th March 2005, 17:36
my money's on something more like the Shadow 200

Goldie fish
27th March 2005, 17:39
Isnt it about time the Air Corps started using target drones too?

Why do the air corps get them? Isnt battlefield surveillance an army task or is it all about demarkation? Who will fly them? Will UAV "Pilots" need to have gained their wings first?

The tender notice was only published last week,so nothing has been selected yet.


Title: IRL-Dublin: non-piloted aircraft
Awarding Authority: Department of Defence
Publication date: 23-Mar-2005
Application Deadline:
Tender Deadline Date:
Tender Deadline Time:
Notice Type: PIN Notices
Has Documents: No
Abstract: Nature and quantity or value of supplies or services for each of the
service categories: Hire of Aircraft.
Quantity of value: 1 000 000 EUR.







Additional Documents




There are no additional documents attached to this notice.






Contact Information




Main Contact: N/a
Admin Contact: N/a
Technical Contact: N/a
Other Contact: N/a







Full Notice Text




PRIOR INFORMATION NOTICE
Supplies
SECTION I: CONTRACTING AUTHORITY
I.1) Official name and address of the contracting authority: Department
of Defence, Infirmary Road, IRL-Dublin 7. Tel.: (01) 8042402. Fax: (01)
6706472.
I.3) Type of contracting authority: Central level.
SECTION II: OBJECT OF THE CONTRACT - SUPPLIES/SERVICES
II.2) Nomenclature
II.3) Nature and quantity or value of supplies or services for each of
the service categories: Hire of Aircraft.
Quantity of value: 1 000 000 EUR.
SECTION IV: ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION
SECTION VI: OTHER INFORMATION
VI.3) Date of dispatch of this notice: 9.3.2005.

mutter nutter
27th March 2005, 17:43
wait a minute, that tender say's 1 million euro :confused:

mutter nutter
27th March 2005, 17:45
any way here's the shadow 200

andy
27th March 2005, 18:13
the shadow 200 doesnt look very robust.

Bam Bam
27th March 2005, 19:19
Cheap, just glue a camera on and no need to train a pilot.

ias
27th March 2005, 20:32
The RFT also says "Hire of Aircraft", anyone any ideas as to what that's about?

IAS

DeV
27th March 2005, 21:28
It would appear that the contract is actually for the hire of "non-piloted aircraft", the contract being worth around 1 million euro.

faughanballagh
28th March 2005, 04:42
So...are these going to replace some of the GASU aircraft in the observation role?

Goldie fish
28th March 2005, 08:30
I remember the forces in NI were using drones for border surveillance back when I was up there in 95...

A fellow garda thought he was being watched by UFOs....

FMolloy
28th March 2005, 14:11
So...are these going to replace some of the GASU aircraft in the observation role?

GASU aircraft operate solely in support of the Gardai. AC aircraft may operate in tandem with the GASU, but cannot replace them.

Stinger
31st March 2005, 11:40
Are the UAV's being hired for a specific reason or event?

Bosco
31st March 2005, 21:12
UAV's and UCAV's are the future casualties are pretty much becoming unacceptable for modern armies normally because CNN seems to know before the unit's CO.
Think of it this way im ballparking a figure of 250,000Euro(correct me if am wrong) to train an air corps pilot until he has his wings for the Pilatus PC-9 and the Twin engine casa.
1 UAV recon costs 150,000Euro that leaves a lot of money to train an operator properly.
Someone will probably say what about firepower delivery all I will say is the predator did a damn good job and its was designed as a man portable recon drone, google UCAV(Unmaned Combat Aerial Vehicle) and see what gets thrown back.
This won't happen immediately but the yanks are very interested (CNN comment) give it 10-15 years and watch what will be floating around on the market.

mutter nutter
25th August 2005, 23:33
wouldn't that be slightly over kill for the atillery we have, we don't have any really long range arty, like 155's or MLRS that need a UAV to spot for them?

Turkey
25th August 2005, 23:45
They may posably be target towing drones, the C172's which currently preform this function are getting on a bit, and it would make more sense to replace them with helicopters which are not too good at towing targets, quite apart from the H&S implications of such an occupation.

California Tanker
26th August 2005, 00:02
Range is relatively irrelevant. The problem is spotting targets. It's quite possible that the ground-based chappy trying to call in artillery can't see what's on the far side of the hill that's a mile in front of him. People also tend to make sure that they're concealed from the front, but rarely make too much effort to conceal from eyes in the sky.

Surprised they're using Air Corps for that though. I believe in most militaries they're run by the Army. (Or Navy if used for NGS)

NTM

The Blue Max
13th April 2007, 20:47
Heres a rave from the grave!

What ever happened to this Project i had last heard that the Army CIS Corps was due to get two of them anyone have any information why it never went ahead?

BMax.

FMolloy
14th April 2007, 01:04
What ever happened to this Project i had last heard that the Army CIS Corps was due to get two of them anyone have any information why it never went ahead?

Who says it never went ahead? Just because we haven't heard anything doesn't mean it's been cancelled.

thebig C
14th April 2007, 10:55
If it's going to be an artillery-type UAV, then maybe it would be something like the British Army Phoenix:

http://www.armedforces.co.uk/army/phoenix1b.jpg

More info. at http://www.armedforces.co.uk/army/listings/l0101.html

or the Desert Hawk, also used by the British Army:

http://www.mod.uk/NR/rdonlyres/EF65BC2B-F559-405D-9A49-FAFCC7C1CE44/0/43BDE2006026034.JPG

Details at http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/DefenceNews/EquipmentAndLogistics/RoyalArtilleryToTakeUavToAfghanistan.htm

apod
14th April 2007, 11:10
Actually it just so happens that willie made a point of mentioning it in his latest output statement to the select committee.The project is going ahead as is the ltav project.:biggrin:

mutter nutter
14th April 2007, 11:29
Actually it just so happens that willie made a point of mentioning it in his latest output statement to the select committee.The project is going ahead as is the ltav project.:biggrin:

Is the statement any where on the web Apod?

FMolloy
14th April 2007, 11:38
Desert Hawk looks a bit small for the role tbh.

mutter nutter
14th April 2007, 11:49
The Pheonix is something a bad idea, it was very late coming into British service, and is considered almost obsolete now, they are in fact looking for it's replacement right now

the desert hawk is more of a SF type, UKSF use them for example.


something like the Falco, or Hunter would be what I'm guessing they are looking at here.

apod
14th April 2007, 13:20
Is the statement any where on the web Apod?

yeah.Sorry i dont know how to link web pages:redface: But its on the oireachteas site under current debates in the committee section.ref select Committee
on justice equality ,defence and womens rights.:smile:

mutter nutter
14th April 2007, 13:53
Thanks Apod :)

hedgehog
14th April 2007, 14:35
I read somewhere

for the life of me I cant remember

that the Brits operating the UAV's for Afghanistan and Iraq

are based in the centre of the US

and not only did they get afghan or iraqi medals

but the also got the DFC as well

was i dreaming / delusional or did anyone else see this

CTU
14th April 2007, 14:52
Actually it just so happens that willie made a point of mentioning it in his latest output statement to the select committee.The project is going ahead as is the ltav project.:biggrin:

Heres the link

http://debates.oireachtas.ie/DDebate.aspx?F=JUS20070403.xml&Page=1&Ex=14#N14


A tender competition for the acquisition of unmanned aerial vehicles for use in reconnaissance is in progress. The competition was carried out in two stages. The first stage, a request for proposals, was followed by a restricted tender competition involving those companies which came through the first stage. The evaluation process is ongoing and it is expected that a contract will be placed later this year. The equipment which will cost about €750,000 will be of significant benefit to the Defence Forces in the performance of duties overseas.

Barry
14th April 2007, 15:29
I read somewhere

for the life of me I cant remember

that the Brits operating the UAV's for Afghanistan and Iraq

are based in the centre of the US

and not only did they get afghan or iraqi medals

but the also got the DFC as well

was i dreaming / delusional or did anyone else see this
I've heard stories of USAF UAV pilots, based in the USA, never once actually leaving the ground during their work, not only wearing flight suits, but doing SERE school (Escape and evasion course, sent because they were technically pilots)

thebig C
14th April 2007, 16:49
The Pheonix is something a bad idea, it was very late coming into British service, and is considered almost obsolete now, they are in fact looking for it's replacement right now

the desert hawk is more of a SF type, UKSF use them for example.


something like the Falco, or Hunter would be what I'm guessing they are looking at here.

I doubt if a buget of €750,000 would buy a Falco or a Hunter, bearing in mind all the ground gear that comes with a UAV?

Scorpy
14th April 2007, 16:59
The Air Corps won't ever get their hands on these things. You don't require wings to fly one of these. Much more likely to be a CIS task. I wonder how 'automatic' they will be? May not last too long, the attrition rate for UAVs from accidents is pretty high. 2 may just die like a damp fart in training!

Goldie fish
14th April 2007, 19:07
Desert Hawk looks a bit small for the role tbh.

Depends on the role. If it does the job for a lower price, how bad!

DeV
14th April 2007, 21:00
Deputy Costello also asked about drones that he heard were flying in disguise over Baghdad. They are approximately the size of a small model plane and are designed to provide over-the-horizon surveillance.

http://debates.oireachtas.ie/DDebate.aspx?F=JUS20070403.xml&Page=1&Ex=75#N75

GoneToTheCanner
14th April 2007, 21:03
Hi Barry
The story of UAV pilots wearing flight suits, whilst firmly attached to the ground, is perfectly true because the first lot of pilots were actual Air Force pilots, as far back as Hound Dog operations in the Vietnam War. In a lot of cases, the HDs were controlled from C-130s and the UAV controllers were pilots and hence wore the full gear. Also, pilots who are detached from actual flight duties are expected to stay current so do fly when not on UAV duty.
regards
gttC

thebig C
14th April 2007, 23:58
If they are only spending €750,000, it will probably be mini-UAVs like the Desert Hawk, operated by the US and UK, or the Elbit Skylark, in operation with the IDF, Canada and Australia. Both are currently in use in Iraq and/or Afghanistan. This is the Skylark. (There are different versions.)

http://www.defense-update.com/images/New-Skylark.jpg

These are clearly Army vehicles. Looks like the Air Corps will have to wait a while before it gets into the UAV business. Maybe the GASU could also use UAVs, bigger, long-endurance craft?

mutter nutter
8th July 2007, 18:51
Anyone have any updates on this?

flash bang
10th July 2007, 01:12
heard a couple of weeks back that arty were getting them and lads were sent to israel on a training course

mutter nutter
12th July 2007, 19:26
heard a couple of weeks back that arty were getting them and lads were sent to israel on a training course
Whch ones?...pointer type?...better buy more them 2 then, they crash pretty regularly:wink:

mutter nutter
12th July 2007, 20:05
Good link to an Armada PDF on drones, they do PDS on everything, armoured vehicles, special forces gear ect, this is this years UAV one
http://www.armada.ch/curr_download.cfm

flash bang
12th July 2007, 21:57
sure don't ya know we'll get the shitey ones

Goldie fish
21st July 2007, 14:18
Thales are quite happy with their new project, Watchkeeper, based on the Elbit Hermes 450 from Israel.
http://www.army-technology.com/projects/watchkeeper/images/2-watchkeeper.jpg



The UK's Watchkeeper programme is the largest UAV programme in Europe, providing unrivalled capability in Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Reconnaissance (ISTAR).
Thales offers a range of capabilities from prime contractorship for complete systems to subsystems supplier, offering a full spectrum of critical subsystems, including data links, radar, optical and electromagnetic payloads, and automatic take-off and landing systems.

Drawing on its understanding of operational requirements, mature technologies, simulation tools and techniques, and experience with manned aircraft of all types, Thales is in an ideal position to design complete Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) based Information, Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Reconnaissance (ISTAR) systems.

Thales provides effective and competitive multi-sensor, multi-mission and multi-platform solutions to meet current and future needs.

Watchkeeper at the cutting edge
The UK Watchkeeper programme illustrates Thales's expertise in UAVs, providing unrivalled ISTAR capability.
With the experience gained from developing Watchkeeper and other ISTAR programmes, Thales is well placed to provide effective and competitive UAV solutions to meet current and future needs.


Watchkeeper UAV
The high performance Watchkeeper UAV has a multi-payload capability, carrying a range of payloads including synthetic aperture radar/ground moving target indicator (SAR/GMTI), electro-optical/infrared sensor (EO/IR), with an optional laser target designator, and data link relays. Its multi-sensor function enables it to deliver high-quality image intelligence day and night, in all weather conditions.

Information gathering
Using Thales's cutting-edge exploitation and dissemination technology, Watchkeeper enables commanders to gather intelligence and track targets without having to deploy troops into potentially sensitive or dangerous areas. It also offers the ability to loiter while a target is engaged.

THALES +
Thales's UAV systems combine air vehicles, sensor suites and ground-based exploitation segments as part of a network-enabled capability.
Thales UAV systems are multi-sensor, multimission and multi-platform solutions, designed to meet a broad range of both military and nonmilitary needs such as civil and energy protection, and economic and environmental monitoring.
Designed in close cooperation with operational users, Thales's range of UAV systems places great emphasis on interoperability, survivability, persistence, endurance and flight operations in military and civil aerospace.

FMolloy
1st August 2007, 11:25
http://www.aeronautics-sys.com/Index.asp?CategoryID=62&ArticleID=35&Page=1

Joshua
1st August 2007, 13:30
See post 1 and eat those words.

mutter nutter
1st August 2007, 15:07
Well it' looks like my talk of something like the hunter ect was pissing in the wind....and it blew back in my face

mutter nutter
1st August 2007, 15:33
video
http://www.aeronautics-sys.com/_Uploads/35ORBITER_Light.wmv

thebig C
1st August 2007, 16:31
Wonder how any of those landings those sensors will survive, whatever about the airframe...

luchi
1st August 2007, 16:38
Why do some of you think that these will be distroyed before they come into service?

Many kids fly radio controlled planes, surely these are just a sophisticated version of the toy planes. I am also sure that the sensitive survailence and communications equipment will only be installed after the boys learn to operate the plane.

And I agree his should be moved out of the air corp area and into army

Goldie fish
1st August 2007, 18:33
More heavy schoolbags to carry..

Hopefully the idea will catch on and more will be aquired.

http://www.aeronautics-sys.com/_Uploads/35Orbiter03.pdf

http://www.aeronautics-sys.com/_uploads/extraimg/Orbiter.jpg

http://www.aeronautics-sys.com/_uploads/extraimg/orbiter%20brochure%20s.jpg

http://www.aeronautics-sys.com/_uploads/extraimg/F1000027-1.jpg

thebig C
1st August 2007, 19:13
Also being bought by Poland...

"Friday, July 27, 2007
..... Beginning with next September Polish soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan will have remotely piloted vehicles; that is, unmanned recco airplanes - PAP has learned from sources close to military.

The army bought six sets of Orbiters. According to PAP information, three of them will go to Afghanistan, one to Iraq and two will remain in Poland for training purposes.

Orbiter is a miniature unmanned recco system, the same as used by the special unit GROM. The system, publicly demonstrated in June last year at the Unit holiday, consists of three remotely controlled airplanes and a ground station.

"Short delivery date probably decided that it became a winner. Rarely any bidder - considering a production cycle of three to four months - is able to deliver such equipment that fast" - told PAP Grzegorz Hołdanowicz, a chief editor of monthly "Raport", who described the Orbiter a year ago.

Orbiter, a product of Israeli's company Aeronautics Defense Systems, is a recco system intended for units from a size of company to a battalion. It has big maximal speed - 139 km/h, and - thanks to a quiet electrical engine and a special paint - is hardly detectable from the ground.

"Orbiter is built as a flying wing system, which means that it is comparatively big, but on the other hand - it is stable in flight, even if exposed to winds and air turbulence, which is important both in Poland, as well as in high mountains - as in Afghanistan. This is a known fact that the system has been in use by three or four countries, and its additional advantage is that it has been already serving Polish military" - points out Hołdanowicz."

(from www militaryphotos.net)

"Following an initial sale, in early 2006, of Orbiter mini UAV systems to the Polish Special Forces, the customer's high satisfaction with the Orbiter's operational performance in Afghanistan over the past year has led to a sharp increase in Aeronautics' activities in Poland (now a member of NATO), and to the decision by the Polish Ministry of Defense to equip its other land forces with a large number of similar systems.

The Orbiter mini UAV system has emerged as the winner of a world-wide tender conducted by the Polish Ministry of Defense, in which eleven other companies, including several from Israel, participated. Out of the six companies that made it to the final stage of the tender, Aeronautics has been selected as the sole supplier of mini UAV systems.

The contract which has just been signed is worth about $3 million and includes the supply of six Orbiter systems, each of which includes three mini air vehicles, day and night camera payloads, portable Ground Control Stations and data links for command and video transmission....

The Orbiter mini UAV system is designed for field deployment by ground forces. The system is simple and easy to operate, thanks to a fully automatic flight control system that includes automatic launch and recovery. The Operator is required only to point the payload camera at the area of interest, and the Orbiter mini UAV automatically flies itself in order to obtain optimum video coverage of the target. It takes only two weeks training to qualify a person without previous knowledge to operate the system.

The IDF is engaged in extensive tests of the Orbiter System, with a view to operational deployment."

(www.shephard.co.uk)

Komsomol
3rd August 2007, 16:38
Artillery Drones my arse, they were bought by the Air Corps, There was only two of them bought. Its pretty damn obvious that they're just being used as a pilot phase to see how useful they are.

More than likely also they were requested by the ARW in support roles for surveillance. I'd bet all of my savings in that last option.

Goldie fish
3rd August 2007, 18:43
I'll hang on to those savings for you if you like. They'll be safe in my bank account.

They are not an aircraft in the true sense. The ARW is not the only one that does surveillance. Don't be so blinkered.

mutter nutter
3rd August 2007, 21:19
I'll hang on to those savings for you if you like. They'll be safe in my bank account.

They are not an aircraft in the true sense. The ARW is not the only one that does surveillance. Don't be so blinkered.
May be a bit of red herring about use for artillary spotting though, 15 KM's range for the controls, why use a UAV with shorter range then the guns it's spotting for?...seems a little impractical

mutter nutter
3rd August 2007, 21:31
Are you familiar with the concept of a FOO?
Yep...and point taken:redface:
Didn't think that one through fully, most armies use UAV's with quite a lot more range then their guns in this sort of role though, oh well I'm sure they have thought through what and why they need it.

Goldie fish
7th October 2007, 11:48
From Dail Debates


39. Deputy Aengus Σ Snodaigh asked the Minister for Defence if he will make a statement on the purchase by the Defence Forces of drones from the Israeli army. [22094/07]

Minister for Defence (Deputy Willie O’Dea): An order for two (2) man portable mini Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, commonly referred to as UAVs, was placed with Aeronautics Defence Systems Limited from Israel, in May 2007. The value of the order is in the region of €780,000, inclusive of VAT. The award of the contract followed on from a two stage tender competition in which eight proposals were initially received and three tenders subsequently evaluated by a Military Board in the first quarter of 2007. Delivery of the UAV systems is expected by the end of 2007.

The UAV systems are required to enhance the capability of the Defence Forces to carry out surveillance and target acquisition for overseas Peace Support Operations and provide low cost, low risk means to increase capabilities and enhance force protection by performing missions which do not demand the use of manned aircraft. The UAVs, will, in effect, be an information-gathering asset. It should be stressed that the UAVs which the Defence Forces are acquiring are unarmed.

The UAVs will also be able to carry out suitable tasks at home in an Aid to the Civil Power or Aid to the Civil Authority environment such as environmental inspections and the undertaking of reconnaissance missions, which may avoid unnecessary exposure of Defence Force personnel to risk.


http://debates.oireachtas.ie/DDebate.aspx?F=DAL20071004.xml&Page=1&Ex=1322#N1322

Anus must be worried he is being watched.

thebig C
8th October 2007, 13:12
From Dail Debates



http://debates.oireachtas.ie/DDebate.aspx?F=DAL20071004.xml&Page=1&Ex=1322#N1322

Anus must be worried he is being watched.


Have UAVs been cleared by the IAA to fly in Irish Airspace?

Turkey
8th October 2007, 15:55
Have UAVs been cleared by the IAA to fly in Irish Airspace?

It might not have to be,I think it's dependent on the weight.
I am checking it with someone in the IAA [Institute Against Aviation]


Watch this space :biggrin:

morpheus
9th October 2007, 09:44
Arent they just glorified radio controlled aircraft!!??

ZULU
12th October 2007, 00:14
10 September 07

QinetiQ's Zephyr UAV exceeds official world record for longest duration unmanned flight


QinetiQ's Zephyr HALE UAV in flight at White Sands

High resolution download
(1156kb )



QinetiQ’s Zephyr High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) has exceeded the official world record time for the longest duration unmanned flight with a 54 hour flight achieved during trials at the US Military's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The flight trials were funded through the Ministry of Defence (MOD) research programme.

The duration of the flight exceeded the current official FAI world record for unmanned flight which stands at 30 hours 24 minutes set by Northrop Grumman's RQ-4A Global Hawk on 22 March 2001. However because there was no FAI official present at White Sands it may not stand as an official world record.

Launched by hand, Zephyr is an ultra-lightweight carbon-fibre aircraft with a wingspan of up to 18 metres but weighing just 30 kg. By day it flies on solar power generated by amorphous silicon arrays no thicker than sheets of paper that cover the aircraft's wings. By night it is powered by rechargeable lithium-sulphur batteries that are recharged during the day using solar power.

The trials validated recent modifications that have improved the efficiency of Zephyr's power system. These have included new solar arrays supplied by United Solar Ovonic, a full flight-set of Sion Power batteries as well as a novel solar-charger and bespoke autopilot developed by QinetiQ, all of which were being flown for the first time. During the trials the same aircraft was flown twice while carrying a surveillance payload – first for 54 hours to a maximum altitude of 58,355 feet, and then for 33 hours 43 minutes to a maximum altitude of 52,247 feet.

Paul Davey, Zephyr business development director at QinetiQ, said: “The possibilities suggested by unmanned flight are truly exciting and with these trials Zephyr has secured its place in the history of UAV development. Both flights were achieved in the face of thunderstorms and debilitating heat in the hostile environment of the New Mexico high desert in the summertime. They have proved that an autonomous UAV can be operated on solar-electric power for the duration required to support persistent military operations.”

Potential applications for Zephyr include earth observation and communications relay in support of a range of defence, security and civil requirements.

Zephyr has demonstrated consistent progress during a series of flight trials at White Sands Missile Range. In December 2005 two aircraft achieved a maximum duration of 6 hours and an altitude above 26,000 feet. The maximum flight duration was trebled to 18 hours and the maximum altitude increased to 36,000 feet at subsequent trials at the missile range in July 2006.





Zephyr is an ultra-lightweight carbon-fibre aircraft that is launched by hand

High resolution download
(1258kb )

http://www.qinetiq.com/home/newsroom/news_releases_homepage/2007/3rd_quarter/qinetiq_s_zephyr_uav.Par.4345.File.tmp/Zephyr%20original.JPG




Press Officer: David Bishop

Tadpole
30th December 2007, 21:04
Any word on this?

Fireplace
14th May 2008, 18:08
Our own little UAV

http://<object width="425" height="355"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/msGHvOl_9Cg&hl=en"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/msGHvOl_9Cg&hl=en" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="355"></embed></object>

pym
14th May 2008, 19:06
The surveillance optics are incredible for such a tiny aircraft

mutter nutter
5th July 2008, 17:04
By Tom Brady Security Editor

Saturday July 05 2008

Two unmanned surveillance drones being used by the Irish peacekeeping forces in Chad have been put out of operation -- at a cost of €70,000.

They were part of a portable mini Unmanned Aerial Vehicle system, commonly known as a UAV. The Defence Forces purchased two of the UAVs from an Israeli company, Aeronautics Defence Systems Ltd, in May last year for €780,000 and they were delivered towards the end of the year.

Each system has three mini drones and a ground control unit, and one of the systems was deployed for operational use in Chad with the initial batch of peacekeepers.

Defence Minister Willie O'Dea confirmed yesterday that one drone disappeared last March when it was launched by the Defence Forces following a report of unidentified armed groups near Goz Beida, where the troops are based. After 25 minutes, the controllers lost contact with the drone and it was never found.

Last month, another drone was launched during the incident in Goz Beida when rebels forced their way into a refugee camp and opened fire on Irish troops, who returned fire over their heads. That drone was recovered but was damaged.

An investigation is being carried out by military authorities into this "malfunction" and involves contact with the Israeli supplier.

The minister said the UAVs were covered by warranty and defective parts would be replaced or repaired free of charge. He explained the UAVs had been purchased to boost the capability of the troops to carry out surveillance for overseas peace support operations.

Protection

Mr O'Dea said they had the capability to provide a low-cost and low-risk means to increase surveillance and enhance force protection by performing missions without the need to use manned aircraft.

The UAVs are an information gathering asset, which are unarmed, and, according to the minister, loss or damage to them is not unusual in armies throughout the world.

Asked about buying from Israel, Mr O'Dea said the Department of Defence maintained an open-door policy with its acquisition of defensive equipment and used competitive tendering.

The department also placed two orders with Israeli Military Industries in 2005 for 5.56mm ammunition, while two orders were also placed for X-ray equipment.

- Tom Brady Security Editor
http://www.independent.ie/national-news/pilotless-spy-plane-used-by-chad-troops--goes-missing-1428101.html

Goldie fish
5th July 2008, 17:22
Tom is reading IMO again. The drones were out of action ages ago, the question was in the Dail on wednesday, he only managed to get it in print today?

ZULU
6th July 2008, 17:41
http://www.defensetech.org/archives/004282.html

http://www.avinc.com/uas_product_details.asp?Prodid=3#

This is a nice one too

paul
6th July 2008, 17:57
I saw a UAV in the ******** aren't I special:biggrin:, , why should i tell you where i saw it, go look for yourself:biggrin: looks cool though :cool: and that's all I'm saying on the matter, haha

WilcoOut
1st December 2008, 19:47
Defence Forces to use Israeli robot spy planes

UAVs used widely in wars in Iraq and Afghanistan

Wednesday August 01 2007

TWO Israeli-made robot spy planes are to be used by the Defence Forces for surveillance missions after the country won a tender competition to supply the hi-tech aircraft.

In a move that could prove politically controversial, Ireland has selected Israel as its supplier of the advanced pilotless drones.

Israel is seen as a key player in the sector as it uses Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) extensively for surveillance and targeted assassination of militants, and it used them recently in the heavy fighting in Lebanon against Hezbollah.

Drones have also been widely used in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan for surveillance and more recently, direct attack using missiles. The UAV selected by Ireland is one of the smallest available and can fit into a soldier's backpack.

The Irish Independent first revealed in January 2006 that Ireland was acquiring UAVs to be operated by Army communications personnel, and not the Air Corps, and that they would be used for surveillance, artillery spotting and support for special forces.

Yesterday, the Department of Defence confirmed that a contract was signed in May with Aeronautics Defence Systems Ltd of Israel for two of their Orbiter systems, in a contract worth €780,000.

A spokeswoman said the Orbiter system was selected after three tenders were evaluated to give the Defence Forces a basic day/night UAV capability.

They would be delivered later this year and would be used to build on the training provided by the company and increase expertise in the Defence Forces, the spokeswoman said.

It is the latest Irish order placed with Israel; the country recently won a €2.5m order for 12,000 helmets for the Defence Forces.

The mini-UAV Orbiter system, according to the manufacturers, gives field commanders near-instant "over the hill" reconnaissance capability, and can be used in counter terror operations, special operations and low intensity conflicts.

Carrying day and night cameras, it can be assembled in ten minutes, carried in a backpack and is operated by two people.

Catapult

It is launched by a catapult, has a 15km range, can fly for an hour and a half, and reaches an altitude of 15,000 feet.

UAVs are now used extensively worldwide, for example they have been used by the Swiss Army and may be used there during the Euro 2008 football championships hosted jointly with Austria.

But their use in Switzerland sparked a debate about privacy after police busted two men who were smoking pot in a forest - after they had been spotted by a pilotless drone.

- Don Lavery

https://www.indymedia.ie/article/83667


not the greatest website to take anything from but in cites the Indo as the source of the story?

have we gottne these UAV's or has it been scrapped?

Jetjock
1st December 2008, 20:02
Got them and lost/crashed them. Haven't heard any updates lately.

WilcoOut
1st December 2008, 20:03
marvelous!

Goldie fish
1st December 2008, 20:08
Whats the point of posting this?

WilcoOut
1st December 2008, 20:10
i just came across this story and was interested to know what the craic was.

i have never heard in my time in the DF of us possessing these nor of anyone speaking about them!

Goldie fish
1st December 2008, 20:10
Bumped thread for wilco.

Goldie fish
1st December 2008, 20:11
Ask Joshua about them.

WilcoOut
1st December 2008, 20:12
perhaps joshua could contribute to this thread when hes online next

parade boy
1st December 2008, 20:31
Bought Israeli mini UAV's last year. Orbiters. Deployed in Chad. Excellent bit of kit. Needs minding. The chicken stranglers lost one due to malfunction and another crashed on take off from Camp Ciara last June. This has been widely reported in the papers. Others there. Extreme heat in Chad effects the control surgfaces of them...therefore while they work pewrfextly in the Israerli Negev, the 50+ in Chad isn't the best.

http://www.aeronautics-sys.com/?CategoryID=254&ArticleID=169

Docman
1st December 2008, 20:36
Got them and lost/crashed them. Haven't heard any updates lately.

Heard all sorts of stories about what happened to them, everything including being sold to the Chinese on the Somali Black Market.

They seem to have disappeared into the abyss that is the Army bureaucratic system.

Probably holed up somewhere where they can be wheeled out everytime the media want to see them but away from anyone who might actually make any use of them.

HavocIRL
1st December 2008, 20:39
Last I heard they were used in chad. One of them went down with a dust clog, the other lost contact with its controller and when that happens its programmed to return to home base. Problem was that home base is the curragh.

Joshua
1st December 2008, 20:51
perhaps joshua could contribute to this thread when hes online next

1.I have done as you asked.

2.Read my signature WO

3.Goldie is biting his lip.

WilcoOut
1st December 2008, 20:54
thanks boys and girls!

my curiosity has been quenched!

Archimedes
2nd December 2008, 00:17
Got them and lost/crashed them. Haven't heard any updates lately.

One of them was involved in an Arty Ex in the glen a few weeks ago and worked just fine.

Jetjock
2nd December 2008, 00:31
Last I heard they were used in chad. One of them went down with a dust clog, the other lost contact with its controller and when that happens its programmed to return to home base. Problem was that home base is the curragh.



Strangely that rarely happens with piloted aircraft. I wonder how far it got?!

Smirking less threatened pilot with evil smile on his face! :biggrin:

On a serious note, it is an extremely lightweight piece of kit but a good capability demonstrator all the same. Im not pushing for operational info-I know better, but as someone who has a good knowledge of aircraft and how they work, an aircraft this small would be limited even in moderate weather conditions, particularly gusts.

Items like this are real force multipliers. They allow bodies on the ground to be direted to where they are needed and can cover large areas of ground much more quickly and discretely than ground forces. UAV technology has advanced and become much more widely used in the past two decades and consequently, one would imagine, reduced in cost. In the modern "information battlefield" Is there a case for say a €10-15m outlay on a small fleet of more rugged longer range UAV's?

Notwithstanding the current economic climate of course.

With something as lightweight as the Orbiter, it would be wrong to make it a central part of military doctrine. If conditions prevail where it would become unusable, as they regularly would here and have shown to in it's first operational theatre in Chad, it certainly would not be a good thing to have forces on the ground relying on it. Therefore it is only an incidental additional capability and one wonders what use that really is?

To put this post into one sentence: Did the Orbiter have a chance to demonstrate a sufficient capability to now justify the purchase of a more reliable/rugged platform?

Steamy Window
2nd December 2008, 01:09
Bought Israeli mini UAV's last year. Orbiters. Deployed in Chad. Excellent bit of kit. Needs minding. The chicken stranglers lost one due to malfunction and another crashed on take off from Camp Ciara last June. This has been widely reported in the papers. Others there. Extreme heat in Chad effects the control surgfaces of them...therefore while they work pewrfextly in the Israerli Negev, the 50+ in Chad isn't the best.

http://www.aeronautics-sys.com/?CategoryID=254&ArticleID=169

Who are the Chicken Stranglers?:confused:

turbocalves
2nd December 2008, 05:05
Who are the Chicken Stranglers?:confused:

the wing,

"apparently" they have to do a survival ex where they go out with a chicken, and at the end of the ex (dont know the duration, if it is in anyway true) they have to kill said fowl, "apparently"

easyrider
2nd December 2008, 13:38
UAVs aren't just for the Army: here's one for the Navy,

http://www.asd-network.com/data_news/ID14156_600.jpg

mutter nutter
2nd December 2008, 16:21
the wing,

"apparently" they have to do a survival ex where they go out with a chicken, and at the end of the ex (dont know the duration, if it is in anyway true) they have to kill said fowl, "apparently"

That "chicken stranglers" nickname seems to be applied to every SF unit in the Western World, the Aussie, NZSAS, the 2 main British SF, ect ect....I wonder what the Russians call their guys:biggrin:

mutter nutter
2nd December 2008, 16:22
UAVs aren't just for the Army: here's one for the Navy,

http://www.asd-network.com/data_news/ID14156_600.jpg
And it can be armed too, Thales stuck 2 new LMM missiles on it....:cool: and it's small, nice for the NS:biggrin:

Goldie fish
2nd December 2008, 19:28
And it can be armed too, Thales stuck 2 new LMM missiles on it....:cool: and it's small, nice for the NS:biggrin:

And you don't have to put up with the Air Corps whinging that they want to be back in bal for tea..

easyrider
2nd December 2008, 22:23
And you don't have to put up with the Air Corps whinging that they want to be back in bal for tea..


David Courtney writes in his book 'Nine Lives' - memories of an Air Corps/Coastguard heli pilot - about a number of Air Corps helicopter pilots who developed such severe cases of seasickness that they were not available to work off LE Eithne.

Goldie fish
7th December 2008, 14:40
Last I heard they were used in chad. One of them went down with a dust clog, the other lost contact with its controller and when that happens its programmed to return to home base. Problem was that home base is the curragh.

http://forum.irishmilitaryonline.com/showpost.php?p=229474&postcount=2

:mad:

Jetjock
7th December 2008, 17:07
Coincidence? I think not.

Goldie fish
7th December 2008, 17:09
Not a chance. All they are short is saying "according to Havoc, on Irishmilitaryonline.com"

parade boy
7th December 2008, 23:48
http://forum.irishmilitaryonline.com/showpost.php?p=229474&postcount=2

:mad:

This is a real old story trotted out when there is nothing else to kick the military with. The last 2 para's also attempt to turn the screw. The quoted reason for loss of the first UAV is complete speculation...who know's. Everyone, including people online here, are feeding the bush telegraph. This maked its way into the national media...'cos it's a funny/stupid/ridiculous story, it gets printed. The DF will alwyas deny these, but the journalists will get the last word. Doesn't make any more credible than some of the sh!t on here. Just that more people read it....and the urban myth lives on. It'll be printed in some other paper within 2 months no doubt.

Docman
8th December 2008, 01:42
This is a real old story trotted out when there is nothing else to kick the military with. The last 2 para's also attempt to turn the screw. The quoted reason for loss of the first UAV is complete speculation...who know's. Everyone, including people online here, are feeding the bush telegraph. This maked its way into the national media...'cos it's a funny/stupid/ridiculous story, it gets printed. The DF will alwyas deny these, but the journalists will get the last word. Doesn't make any more credible than some of the sh!t on here. Just that more people read it....and the urban myth lives on. It'll be printed in some other paper within 2 months no doubt.

Well, with some of the fabrications being brought out by the Army, DoD, and Minister, we might as well all get in on the act and start making it up as we go along.

paul g
8th December 2008, 05:28
This is a real old story trotted out when there is nothing else to kick the military with. The last 2 para's also attempt to turn the screw. The quoted reason for loss of the first UAV is complete speculation...who know's. Everyone, including people online here, are feeding the bush telegraph. This maked its way into the national media...'cos it's a funny/stupid/ridiculous story, it gets printed. The DF will alwyas deny these, but the journalists will get the last word. Doesn't make any more credible than some of the sh!t on here. Just that more people read it....and the urban myth lives on. It'll be printed in some other paper within 2 months no doubt.

I seem to remember that the story about the UAV flying back to the curragh started off in the phoenix magazine, hardly a publication that could be regarded of the DF greatest allies.

Bravo20
8th December 2008, 09:14
Why are they re-hashing old news.

concussion
8th December 2008, 10:01
Perhaps we should start to post dis-information with the express purpose of getting some good press. Or some stuff that is so ridiculous no-one would believe it if it was printed?

parade boy
8th December 2008, 10:18
Why are they re-hashing old news.

...'cos it's lazy journalism. Nothing else to write about...no point telling people all is well. Write about the last bit of controversy/remarkable thing that happened and it will fill a page. It really is that simple.

Goldie fish
8th December 2008, 18:40
They rehash it because the author(and I use the term very loosely) reads this site and thinks they have a scoop.

The truth of course is that Mary Harney ate it.

ZULU
4th June 2010, 09:14
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Imagine these armed with an explosive charge and networked into a swarm.

Eeeeek!

Buck
4th June 2010, 12:44
it would take a bit of training on them, what you reckon ZULU?

ZULU
4th June 2010, 13:10
critical word there is autonomous.

Check out the end of the video

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Buck
4th June 2010, 13:13
it would take good control skills to get them all in unison though...still, once you have the hang of it...

Barry
4th June 2010, 13:16
Autonomous means that they control themselves, with no human involvement other than a general set of commands of what to do.

Buck
4th June 2010, 13:23
Autonomous means that they control themselves, with no human involvement other than a general set of commands of what to do.

but wont they take some programming firstly? Or could that all be done at the factory? I'm pretty sure there'd need to be a decent but of programming training done

Captain Edmund Blackadder
20th August 2010, 05:11
Was just browsing the web looking up diy UAVs. Found a speech on youtube from a Westpoint Cadet who put together a UAV as a project. It's an hour long, so I'll try summarise.

Here's a video of it night flying at c. 2:20, with an €18 camera.
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It's looking like a functioning one could be developed from scratch for 350 euro per system, and 400 for the ground station. That's one with auto pilot, G.P.S. onboard to set way points on, sensors for level autonomous flight, live video feed on a moveable mount which moves in correspondence with a gyro mounted to a video head set. Cost is assuming you have nothing to begin with. Basic programming, and electronics skills are needed.

But, the thing is, you can use found components from what I can see, like G.P.S. chips and accelerometers from phones and other devices, and with a little messing about, develop an app for a smart phone for it. Could be a very interesting project. Certainly a cheap alternative, and with a little development, a very reliable one.

An interesting project for the technically gifted.

Captain Edmund Blackadder
20th August 2010, 05:13
Here's a quick explaination of the system.

<object width="640" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/TW8QbBhMbxE?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/TW8QbBhMbxE?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="640" height="385"></embed></object>

Buck
20th August 2010, 09:12
What do you be at in 05.11 the mornings?

Captain Edmund Blackadder
20th August 2010, 14:07
Can't go into detail, but let's just say a certain country isn't a smoking crater today because of my late nights...

ZULU
20th August 2010, 14:26
Can't go into detail, but let's just say a certain country isn't a smoking crater today because of my late nights...

You really should cut back on the World in Conflict video gaming

Flamingo
20th August 2010, 14:50
Can't go into detail, but let's just say a certain country isn't a smoking crater today because of my late nights...
Is that because you are too tired to go to work in the mornings? :tongue:

Captain Edmund Blackadder
20th August 2010, 19:53
I've said enough about Operation Can't Get Back To Sleep With the F***ing Neighbours Making Noise. In fact, I never mentioned it.

ZULU
18th October 2010, 20:54
http://www.engineeringtv.com/video/Velodyne-HDL-32E-LiDAR-Sensor

Sensors getting smaller!

ZULU
25th October 2010, 20:30
<object width="640" height="390"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/geqip_0Vjec&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&version=3"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/geqip_0Vjec&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="390"></embed></object>

Imagine being able to launch a swarm of these things and send them into a house where they autonomously navigate through the rooms sending live video back to an optics device.

Skynet / minority report is here!