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McCarthy
13th November 2005, 18:15
I am hoping to get a place in the 2007 cadet class and I have put a lot of recearch into the application process, ranks etc..
But I dont have a clue about what branch I should join.
I was wondering if there was any NS personnel here that could give me an idea about which branch is best, or offers more chances for promotions

Thanks a million

Goldie fish
13th November 2005, 18:46
Why do you want to join the Naval service?
Is it to Command Ships or Make sure they keep running.
I always thought the options were Executive Branch or Engineering Branch.

Promotion prospects are the same for both up to Lt Commander level, which is a long way off for a potential cadet.

If you want to Be Flag Officer Commanding Naval service, then dont go to Engineers.

McCarthy
13th November 2005, 18:59
i have always leaned towards the idea of deck but if i want to leave after 12 years, what i have i got to show? i can drive a boat- thats not much to show for 12 years if you ask me.
I could do engineering but id like to make captain someday. im sure you can see the prediciment im in

Goldie fish
13th November 2005, 19:52
I can,I mean this in the nicest possible way, but you should do a bit more research into the job you are applying for.
A deck officer does not drive a "boat". Thats an ABs job.
A deck officer is a manager, responsible for the efficient running of the ship above hull level. The Primary role of deck officers is Navigation, but they are also responsible for the welfare of the seamen in their respective division.Their secondary role in this country is boarding officer, which is effectively a policeman at sea.

hptmurphy
15th November 2005, 21:32
Ah leave him off!...I think the terminology is brilliant....the drive a boat terminology will go down great at the interview.......I want to be a captain....sure son we have loadsa vacancies come on in....!

Its just like the old days when little legionaire was here!

GoneToTheCanner
15th November 2005, 22:32
Hi all
HPT, you sweaty old cynic, you'll frighten the boy!...What'll you have to show for twelve years service? Well, for a start, you'll be a damn sight more mature and wiser than you are now;you'll have all the appropriate Marine Qualifications;you'll have a bunch of mates that'll stand you for life and a host of good, middling and bad experiences and you'll have a totally different perspective on life. You'll also be instantly employable anywhere.
regards
GttC

hptmurphy
16th November 2005, 09:51
Thanks GTTC...I really do wonder sometimes where your grace and sensibility came from!

LT Mac....at what stage in the process of joining the NS are you or is it a possible future amongst others......

GTTC kinda somes most of it up in what he says but you may want to refine your reasons for interview process...

McCarthy
16th November 2005, 21:00
At the moment Im in 5th year.
My dad is in the Navy so it wasnt too hard a decision to make.

hptmurphy
16th November 2005, 22:53
whos's yer dad...pm ..me i might remember him! graciously no doubt....

McCarthy
17th November 2005, 08:12
..

GoneToTheCanner
17th November 2005, 22:11
Hi there
Hi HPT, I had to wean off the old bad Don habits before I was fit for the general populus again.I'm alright now, but I sometimes get retro and get all non-cuddly and cynical!...You never know, his Da might be FOCNS!
regards
GttC

Steamy Window
5th December 2005, 19:37
Is it possible for a naval officer, after a period of time at sea, to transfer to the army? What sort of training is undertaken, and for how long? Are they restricted in how far they can be promoted?

Goldie fish
5th December 2005, 22:53
Its easier for Navy to go army than the other way around. Most of those who do go to corps units.

Steamy Window
5th December 2005, 23:55
Its easier for Navy to go army than the other way around. Most of those who do go to corps units.

Any reason for that?

Goldie fish
5th December 2005, 23:58
Any Idiot can be an army officer. A naval officer needs to be able to navigate a ship, or be a marine engineer...

Considering most army officers are a lethal weapon when given a map, can you imagine the damage they would do in a landmark free environment?

Vice Admiral
6th December 2005, 01:16
I think your being a bit flippant Goldie, in a manner likely to cause offence. I would agree with your supposition but only in an early part of an officers career, i.e. Ens or S/Lt can transfer and catch up but after that it's not so easy.

ODIN
6th December 2005, 12:01
But the question is Kermit, would he really want to be one?!?

Goldie fish
6th December 2005, 18:33
Pot. Kettle. etc.

hptmurphy
6th December 2005, 21:46
well now in fairness muppetry is not confined to army officers...nor RDF officers...but the up and coming seem to have cornered the market!

Slacker
8th December 2005, 20:19
*rolls his eyes*


Doth the paintwork make war with the funnels
And the deck to the cannons complain?
Nay, they know that some soap and fresh water
Unites them as brothers again.

So ye, being heads of departments,
Do you growl with a smile on your lip,
Lest ye strive and in anger be parted,
And lessen the might of your ship.


Arrrg........eth

McCarthy
8th December 2005, 20:33
aah Adm. R. A. Hopwood.....he doth great work

Goldie fish
8th December 2005, 20:47
No doubt he dined with those on the mess decks all the time...

GoneToTheCanner
9th December 2005, 01:04
Hi all
Is this the collective shouldering of chips going on?! Let's try and give the guy some valid advice. My experience of the present officer type is that they're better than the generation I served with (among notable exceptions) and are more aware of themselves and less "aloof", for want of a better word. There's certainly less of an education gap betwen the non-officers and the officers and the cadet intake has a much broader class/demographic base than ever before. People have become officers that simply wouldn't have been accepted before and the PDF is the better for it.
regards
GttC