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  1. #51
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    The NZ Army Future Land Operating Concept has been released.

    http://www.army.mil.nz/downloads/pdf...ncept-2035.pdf

    It is worth a read in my view. Looks to how a small fairly cash strapped Army can stay relevant in the expected contested world of 2035.

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  3. #52
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    Seems that the NZ ANZAC upgrades (over 500 million) means that the suggested "Littoral Support Ship" has been cancelled, wonder why NZ went with the upgrades they have picked rather than going with the RAN upgrade, along with the fact that they are going to be the only Sea Ceptor user in the Pacific currently...

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  5. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky42 View Post
    Seems that the NZ ANZAC upgrades (over 500 million) means that the suggested "Littoral Support Ship" has been cancelled, wonder why NZ went with the upgrades they have picked rather than going with the RAN upgrade, along with the fact that they are going to be the only Sea Ceptor user in the Pacific currently...
    The high end LOSV tender has been chopped but they are still replacing current Dive/MCM vessel which will be in service next year. The full capability expeditionary littoral warfare vessel is still on the DWP long term plans.

    The RAN ANZAC upgrade approach was cheaper per ship and by quite a margin. Why did they go with alternative configuration? Because there was a view that the RAN upgraded ships are right on the displacement limit and would not have the kind of seakeeping for NZ waters which include the Southern Ocean.

    Sea Ceptor is not a bad approach and will make in roads over time in the Asia Pacific. With ESSM even quad packed there is all that extra weight, space and maintenance required to fit extra Mk41 VLS cells. The NZ Anzacs are removing their Tac length Mk41 cells as they are now deadweight and space hogs.

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  7. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anzac View Post

    The RAN ANZAC upgrade approach was cheaper per ship and by quite a margin. Why did they go with alternative configuration? Because there was a view that the RAN upgraded ships are right on the displacement limit and would not have the kind of seakeeping for NZ waters which include the Southern Ocean.

    Sea Ceptor is not a bad approach and will make in roads over time in the Asia Pacific. With ESSM even quad packed there is all that extra weight, space and maintenance required to fit extra Mk41 VLS cells. The NZ Anzacs are removing their Tac length Mk41 cells as they are now deadweight and space hogs.

    Keep in mind that the RAN ships have been upgraded through a series of separately funded projects. The last of these will see the installation of a phased array long range L-Band search radar to replace the current SP-49, which will be additional to the current X and S band arrays. They will have a radar suite thatís far more capable, and likely far more expenses, than the set up that will be fitted to the NZ ships.

    The RAN ships have also had a lot of hull work competed to restore buoyancy margins, including fully enclosing the quarterdeck.

    Yes, ESSM is heavy compared to SeaCeptor, but that's essentially because its a much faster missile with a significantly longer range.

  8. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by SouthernOne View Post
    Keep in mind that the RAN ships have been upgraded through a series of separately funded projects. The last of these will see the installation of a phased array long range L-Band search radar to replace the current SP-49, which will be additional to the current X and S band arrays. They will have a radar suite thatís far more capable, and likely far more expenses, than the set up that will be fitted to the NZ ships.

    The RAN ships have also had a lot of hull work competed to restore buoyancy margins, including fully enclosing the quarterdeck.

    Yes, ESSM is heavy compared to SeaCeptor, but that's essentially because its a much faster missile with a significantly longer range.
    The NZ Anzacs also completed a propulsion and systems upgrade just prior to the FSU project. They were effectively gutted internally and the quarterdeck semi enclosed.

    I recently attended the decommissioning of Manawanui and asked a 4 striper why the RNZN did not dovetail with the RAN. "The question we posed was what are our operational priorities? The RAN Anzacs met what they wanted to do but not what we wanted." The further points that he made were 1) the upgrade decision was not made lightly and evolved over years 2) Sea keeping was a significant factor and they believe they got the best balance and will end up with a faster and more agile ship. 3) The RAN requirements favoured a greater emphasis on AD than was deemed necessary for the RNZN which required stable general purpose frigate with good effective LAAD for the conditions it will operate until we replace them.

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  10. #56
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    As a heads-up to those who are interested the first of 4 Beechcraft Kingair 350i's are currently being delivered from Hawker Pacific Australia to RNZAF Ohakea for 42 Sqd. The base airframes are low houred recent builds and will undergo pre delivery fitout by Hawker Pacific NZ. It is still not clear if they will replace the leased B200's presently in service. The B200's currently deliver multi-engine pilot training, consolidation flying, short-range light transport (including VIP tasks). The B350's will have a sensor suite fitted to enable Air Warfare Specialist training and inner EEZ maritime patrol for fisheries & customs work. In recent years RNZAF air warfare training has been conducted in Australia however a decision was made to bring it back in house. To add all that workload onto just 4 platforms seems somewhat hectic though I understand that sims and procedral trainers would alleviate much. Furthermore training front seaters and back seaters at the same time in real world - real time conditions on occasions would have benefits.

    The new DefMin is also undertaking a review of the previous governments $20 billion defence capitalisation spend and has asked the US DefSec for an extension to the offer and acceptance timetable of the P-8A's requested last year. Some see this as nefarious and a sign that the government would not commit to the deal however I think it has more to do with the new DefMin being seen to not rubber stamp the previous governments selection without some political theatre.

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  12. #57
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    Following up on the order of the four KA-350-ER's the decision on the four RNZAF P8A Poseidons to replace the six P-3K's will go to Cabinet in 2 weeks. The NZ Govt have until mid July to confirm their USD$1.4B order with the US DoD.

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  14. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anzac View Post
    Following up on the order of the four KA-350-ER's the decision on the four RNZAF P8A Poseidons to replace the six P-3K's will go to Cabinet in 2 weeks. The NZ Govt have until mid July to confirm their USD$1.4B order with the US DoD.
    Media article confirming my post from a week or so ago:

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/pol...ilitary-planes

    There will be Champagne in 5Sqd if this gets over the line. Next up will be the C-130H replacement.

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  16. #59
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    The New Zealand Defence Force Force has released its 2018 Strategic Defence Policy Statement

    https://defence.govt.nz/assets/Uploa...ement-2018.pdf

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  18. #60
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    Thats a very nice paper I forgot they were one of the five eyes
    Last edited by trellheim; 6th July 2018 at 11:16.
    "Are they trying to shoot down the other drone? "

    "No, they're trying to fly the tank"

  19. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anzac View Post
    The New Zealand Defence Force Force has released its 2018 Strategic Defence Policy Statement

    https://defence.govt.nz/assets/Uploa...ement-2018.pdf
    A Def Minister with military (extensive judging by the tin plate) service/experience... good drills...
    "Well, stone me! We've had cocaine, bribery and Arsenal scoring two goals at home. But just when you thought there were truly no surprises left in football, Vinnie Jones turns out to be an international player!" (Jimmy Greaves)!"

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  21. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Truck Driver View Post
    A Def Minister with military (extensive judging by the tin plate) service/experience... good drills...
    At age 16 the Hon Ron Mark MP entered the New Zealand Army’s Regular Force Cadet School, Waiouru, graduating in 1971 as a soldier mechanic. In 1978 he was accepted for Officer Cadet Training and graduated as a 2nd Lieutenant.

    In 1982, as a mechanical engineering officer, he successfully completed the NZSAS selection course. That same year he was one of five New Zealand Army officers deployed to help set up the Multinational Force and Observers peacekeeping operation in the Sinai desert.

    After being denied entry into continuance training with the NZSAS by his then Corps Commander he joined the Sultan of Oman's Armed Forces in 1985 becoming an electrical and mechanical engineering officer in the Omani Special Forces. He retired in 1990 finishing as a Major.

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  23. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anzac View Post
    Media article confirming my post from a week or so ago:

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/pol...ilitary-planes

    There will be Champagne in 5Sqd if this gets over the line. Next up will be the C-130H replacement.

    https://www.beehive.govt.nz/sites/de...-07/P-8_A3.pdf

    BEEHIVE PRESS RELEASE - 9 JULY 2018

    New Zealand to buy four P-8A Poseidon Maritime Patrol Aircraft

    HON RON MARK


    The coalition Government has agreed to purchase four Boeing P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft from the United States Government.

    The four aircraft will replace the aging six P-3K2 Orion maritime patrol aircraft that have been operated by the Royal New Zealand Air Force since the 1960s. The current Orion fleet will reach the end of their expected operational life in 2025.

    ‚ÄúThe purchase ensures the Defence Force can continue to deliver the country‚Äôs maritime surveillance, resource protection, humanitarian and disaster response around New Zealand and across the South Pacific,‚ÄĚ says Ron Mark.

    “This decision strengthens the coalition Government’s Pacific Reset by providing a maritime patrol capability with the significant range and endurance needed to assist our partners in the region.

    ‚ÄúThe purchase enables New Zealand to continue to deploy in a wide range of airborne maritime situations independently, and when required, work effectively with partners including Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States, which all operate, or will operate, the aircraft,‚ÄĚ says Ron Mark.

    The role of maritime patrol aircraft includes:

    Supporting maritime surveillance, humanitarian aid and disaster response, and resource protection around NZ and in the South Pacific; Contributing to the international rules based order through participation in global peace and security operations; Search and rescue in New Zealand’s region, which stretches from the South Pole almost to the Equator and covers 1/11th of the earth’s surface; Environmental and marine resource monitoring.

    ‚ÄúOne example of the requirement for a fully capable maritime patrol aircraft is simply the number of lives that can be saved,‚ÄĚ Mr Mark said.

    “In the last seven years of search and rescue operations in our region, Orion maritime patrols have contributed to saving 119 lives.

    “Other tasks the Orions have undertaken recently have included participation in international operations to counter piracy and illicit smuggling off the Horn of Africa, surveillance of the volcano in Vanuatu, assessing damage from Cyclones Winston and Gita in the Pacific, surveillance of critical infrastructure after the Kaikoura earthquake, and fisheries monitoring.

    ‚ÄúMaintaining a maritime patrol capability is essential for New Zealand‚Äôs national security, and for our ability to contribute to global security efforts,‚ÄĚ says Ron Mark.

    The new P-8As, training systems, infrastructure and introduction into service costs will total $2.346 billion. They will be delivered and begin operations from 2023.

    The capital cost will be spread over a number of financial years out to 2025/26. This is an investment decision that has fallen on this Government to make, but will be spread over the medium term and will deliver for New Zealand for many decades to come. The P-8A was the most cost-effective maritime patrol aircraft option available.

    No. 5 Squadron, which currently operates the Orions, will shift from Whenuapai to Ohakea air force base to operate the P-8As.

    The Government will also consider options for a complementary maritime surveillance capability during the forthcoming Defence Capability Plan review, due to be completed by the end of 2018.

    ‚ÄúThe complementary capability will consider smaller manned aircraft, remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) or satellites, for additional maritime surveillance tasks within New Zealand‚Äôs Exclusive Economic Zone and near region. This will free up the new P-8A fleet to fly more missions, in the South Pacific and further afield,‚ÄĚ says Ron Mark.

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