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  1. #51
    Moderator DeV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EUFighter View Post
    Little Latvia to get UH-60M Blackhawks
    https://eng.lsm.lv/article/society/d...pters.a287706/
    4 for €173 million

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeV View Post
    4 for €173 million
    Aircraft, GSE, training, facilities, spares and support package.
    Typical FMS package.

  3. #53
    Moderator DeV's Avatar
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    Yes and we got the original 4 AW139s for € 48.4 million in 2005

    Now that may not have included the GPMGs, Lifeports, PbH contract etc but still a big difference



    I’m not making a judgement on it positive or negative just showing the difference

  4. #54
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    That 173m is probably over 20 years.

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  6. #55
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    The US Air Force has selected the AW139 to replace its Huey's.



    Boeing MH-139 to Replace U.S. Air Force UH-1N Huey Fleet

    Boeing [NYSE: BA] will provide its MH-139 helicopter and related support to the U.S. Air Force to replace the more than 40-year-old UH-1N “Huey” helicopters used to protect America’s intercontinental ballistic missile bases.

    The program awarded today is valued at $2.4 billion for up to 84 helicopters, training devices and associated support equipment.

    “We’re grateful for the Air Force’s confidence in our MH-139 team,” said David Koopersmith, vice president and general manager, Boeing Vertical Lift. “The MH-139 exceeds mission requirements, it’s also ideal for VIP transport, and it offers the Air Force up to $1 billion in acquisition and lifecycle cost savings.”

    The MH-139 derives from the Leonardo AW139, which is used by more than 270 governments, militaries and companies worldwide. Leonardo will assemble the helicopters at its northeast Philadelphia plant, with Boeing integrating military-specific components at its facility south of that city.

    The contract also includes operations, maintenance, training systems and support equipment for the MH-139 aircraft.

    “We’re proud to provide the U.S. Air Force with solutions across the entire services ecosystem,” said Ed Dolanski, president of U.S. Government Services, Boeing Global Services. “With the AW139 platform’s more than 2 million flight hours and established supply chain, we look forward to applying our expertise to drive cost savings while supporting mission readiness.”
    http://boeing.mediaroom.com/2018-09-...295_130294-117

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  8. #56
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    Described as a 'militarised' AW-139. What will be the differences between this and the AC AW-139s?

  9. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaithiDub View Post
    Described as a 'militarised' AW-139. What will be the differences between this and the AC AW-139s?
    Made in USA.
    Painted "US Military green" instead of "green"?

    There is more space for avionics in the nosecone compared to the Italian Built AW139.
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  10. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by na grohmit� View Post
    There is more space for avionics in the nosecone compared to the Italian Built AW139.
    There is a long nose version is also available on Italian built machines and is in service with on Italian Air Force, Coast Guard and Maltese Armed Forces.

    Quite a surprise that the UH-72 Lakota lost this one. Like that aircraft, it's intended for domestic use only.

  11. #59
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    one thing that hasn't changed from the Dauphin era is that the cockpit entry door is too small for a fully kitted out pilot to be able to enter easily......I wonder how long it will be before they have to tool around with skis on, because of the tiny tyres.

  12. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoneToTheCanner View Post
    one thing that hasn't changed from the Dauphin era is that the cockpit entry door is too small for a fully kitted out pilot to be able to enter easily......I wonder how long it will be before they have to tool around with skis on, because of the tiny tyres.
    The Italians also appear to have modified the main undercarriage on theirs:
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...cropped%29.jpg
    https://cdn.airplane-pictures.net/im...9/2/452719.jpg

    Versus:
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...39_Lofting.jpg

    Looks like they have a longer schnoz, the exhausts are buried behind more cowling, tougher main undercarriage, HF antenna and possibly MAWS? All nice to have...

  13. #61
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    I seem to recall I was told at an air show once by an air corps pilot that Agusta Westland (as they were then known) where watching the air corps operations with the 139 in the early days with an eye on improving the design with the promise that any updates could be easily retrofitted. Looks like everyone else benefited except the air corps
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  15. #62
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    Same with the Casas and the Dauphins; the Air Corps as laboratory. Same with the Hs 125 , the GIII and the King Airs. We had some of the highest hours and cycles per annum on those airframes, compared to most civvy users of the same types and the manufacturers were always keen to see how we got on, especially with respect to corrosion and cracking. Even other Alouette users came to us for gen.

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  17. #63
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    Modifying the undercarriage would probably require the most extensive work - the rest of the mods are probably bolt on and could be done by Leonardo under a midlife upgrade, if the funding was made available.

    And for that to happen, there'd have to be some appetite for deploying the Air Corps abroad.

    Perhaps if the PC-12's are ever deployed in support of overseas missions, there'll be a realisation that provision of some kind of CSAR will be necessary.

    Although the cheapest option is to keep everything at home, so....

  18. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaithiDub View Post
    Described as a 'militarised' AW-139. What will be the differences between this and the AC AW-139s?
    The Air Corps' AW139's are "militarised", anything that is adapted for military use is "militarised".

    The differences is going to be what the customer wants.
    Likely a FLIR turret, SAR winch, GPS/INS, HF/VHF/UHF LOS and SATCOM radios, IFF transponders, missile warning system, navigation/weather radar, radar jammers, machine-gun mounts and chaff/flare dispensers.
    Boeing will more than likely fit equipment and material used on their Chinook production line to keep the costs down. Also, expect to see the same equipment as used already with the Pave Hawks.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jetjock View Post
    Quite a surprise that the UH-72 Lakota lost this one. Like that aircraft, it's intended for domestic use only.
    It wasn't offered. There was only two other helis offered, Sikorsky with a Pave Hawk variant and another company with upgraded ex-US Army Black Hawks. It was probably too small for what they wanted anyway.
    Bell refused to enter the competition saying it was biased towards Sikorsky, maybe Airbus thought the same or had nothing suitable for the tender in US production.

  19. #65
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    An interesting documentary about the AW139 Factory, and what goes into building each aircraft.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bsxlYEOmfM0
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  21. #66
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  22. #67
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    The Hueys being replaced are worn out hulls that are used in airfield defence, ballistic missile site duty, routine non-combat utility and so on. I was reading on another forum about how worn the UH-1s are, that readiness times have fallen thru the floor. They have reached the point of no return as far as the cost of maintenance is concerned.

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