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  1. #176
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    Whatever the cost of participation was I reckon it was well worth it as it reflects the overall standard of the unit and most importantly concerns a key/core operational skill/ability in marked contrast to e.g the ES. I suppose there are some in certain quarters who would prefer to talk up horses jumping at Hickstead rather than units that can kill at 1000m+.

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  3. #177
    Lord Chief Bottlewasher trellheim's Avatar
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    concerns a key/core operational skill/ability in marked contrast to e.g the ES
    wut ? by what do you mean the ES
    "Are they trying to shoot down the other drone? "

    "No, they're trying to fly the tank"

  4. #178
    Viking HavocIRL's Avatar
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    I heard they cheated.......

    Hid the orienteering flags after they marked them so the other teams couldn't find them..........

    *Takes cover*
    To close with and kill the enemy in all weather conditions, night and day and over any terrain

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  6. #179
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    Quote Originally Posted by trellheim View Post
    wut ? by what do you mean the ES
    ES = equitation school.

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  8. #180
    Lord Chief Bottlewasher trellheim's Avatar
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    ahhh thanks
    "Are they trying to shoot down the other drone? "

    "No, they're trying to fly the tank"

  9. #181
    King Monkey FMolloy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by danno View Post
    ES = equitation school.
    Just say "horsies".
    "The dolphins were monkeys that didn't like the land, walked back to the water, went back from the sand."

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  11. #182
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    check out 'army sniper association' - facebook for full list of results. arw won by a country mile from the home (fort benning) team who probably set up the fekin course to begin with! is it true they had to borrow us weapons because aer lingus frown apon carrying such items? thought if the hardware was in the hold it would be ok.

  12. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by HavocIRL View Post
    I heard they cheated.......

    Hid the orienteering flags after they marked them so the other teams couldn't find them..........

    *Takes cover*
    This years Sniper Concentration was controversial to say the least.

  13. #184
    Lt General Bravo20's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by restless View Post
    check out 'army sniper association' - facebook for full list of results. arw won by a country mile from the home (fort benning) team who probably set up the fekin course to begin with! is it true they had to borrow us weapons because aer lingus frown apon carrying such items? thought if the hardware was in the hold it would be ok.
    How do you know they flew Aer Lingus? There are many air lines that operate between Dublin and the US, the DF are not limited to using the former Irish air line.

  14. #185
    Lt General apod's Avatar
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    They bring their own weapons.
    "Let us be clear about three facts:First of all.All battles and all wars are won in the end by the Infantryman.Secondly the Infantryman bears the brunt of the fighting,his casualties are heavier and he suffers greater extremes of fatigue and discomfort than the other arms.Thirdly,the art of the Infantryman is less stereotyped and harder to acquire than that of any other arm".
    -- Field Marshall Earl Wavell.1948

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  16. #186
    2/Lt Bam Bam's Avatar
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    I'd say that defence pact with the UK comes with frequent flyer miles.
    It is only by contemplation of the incompetent that we can appreciate the difficulties and accomplishments of the competent.

  17. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhodes View Post
    This years Sniper Concentration was controversial to say the least.
    Sour grapes more like....

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  19. #188
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    Hi, I'm new on here and very much looking forward to taking part. I have to say I have long believed that the Defence Forces are the finest ambassadors our country has and the successful sniper team only endorsed the high standards set by our military despite under funding. Pours scorn upon those who like to make out the PDF are "Mickey Mouse'.

    Well done to the ARW!

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  21. #189
    Non Temetis Messor The real Jack's Avatar
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    10th place for the green lids in the US special ops sniper comp from 23 teams including a UK team.

    1. 3rd SFG
    2. Netherlands
    3. 1st SFG
    4. Germany
    5. 3rd SFG
    6. USASOC
    7. 10th SFG
    8. 5th SFG
    9. USASOC
    10. Ireland
    Everyone who's ever loved you was wrong.

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  23. #190
    Lt General apod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The real Jack View Post
    10th place for the green lids in the US special ops sniper comp from 23 teams including a UK team.

    1. 3rd SFG
    2. Netherlands
    3. 1st SFG
    4. Germany
    5. 3rd SFG
    6. USASOC
    7. 10th SFG
    8. 5th SFG
    9. USASOC
    10. Ireland
    Source?
    "Let us be clear about three facts:First of all.All battles and all wars are won in the end by the Infantryman.Secondly the Infantryman bears the brunt of the fighting,his casualties are heavier and he suffers greater extremes of fatigue and discomfort than the other arms.Thirdly,the art of the Infantryman is less stereotyped and harder to acquire than that of any other arm".
    -- Field Marshall Earl Wavell.1948

  24. #191
    Non Temetis Messor The real Jack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by apod View Post
    Source?
    http://soldiersystems.net/2017/04/10...aptar-s-again/
    Everyone who's ever loved you was wrong.

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  26. #192
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    is this the same comp we won not so long ago?

  27. #193
    Non Temetis Messor The real Jack's Avatar
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    We've won the us army sniper comp, not sure if we've won the USASOC version, the big standard one they all use standard us army equipment but the USASOC they use whatever they want, so funding would make a bit of a difference in capability as teams would have race guns specced for the comp not just taking their rifles off the rack and cracking on.
    Everyone who's ever loved you was wrong.

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  29. #194
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    Targets, bullets and soldiers... deep in the Wicklow mountains

    Defence Forces International Marksmanship Skills challenge takes place in Glen of Imaal


    Sgt David Greene helps Cpl Nigel Callanan find the target at the Defence Forces’ International Marksmanship Skills Competition in the Glen of Imaal, Co Wicklow.

    David Greene sat down fully clothed in the cold, peaty brown water of the River Slaney flowing off Lugnaquilla mountain, and tried to make himself comfortable.

    As the water penetrated his boots and trousers, he wrestled with a bipod, its two spidery legs refusing to anchor themselves securely among the rocks on the river bed. No matter how many times he jabbed them into the river, or leaned further back into the water to alter the angle of attack, he could not get a steady purchase.

    Behind Sgt Greene sat his Defence Forces colleague Cpl Nigel Callanan, he too up to his chest in water. Callanan got as close to Greene as he could, wrapping his legs around his midriff like a pair of children sitting on a floor and playing train.

    After a few seconds they gave up on the bipod and concentrated instead on their target – a matchstick-like object, silhouetted on the brow of a hill and just left of a small, wind-bent tree, 240 metres away.

    In the absence of the bipod, Callanan improvised, placing his .308 calibre sniper rifle on Greene’s right shoulder and lowered his eye on to its sight.

    “Target,” shouted umpire Sgt Tom Weldon at the top of his voice, “lone bushy-top tree, top of the horizon. . .”

    “Seen,” interrupted Greene, playing the role of sniper team spotter.

    “...slightly to the left. . .” continued Weldon, pointing out the matchstick.

    “Seen,” said Greene.

    Weldon: “. . .any questions?”

    “How many rounds?” asked Callanan.

    Weldon: “Five rounds.”

    Make the target

    From the moment they heard the conclusion of Weldon’s instructions, Greene and Callanan had three minutes to choose where to sit in the river, settle themselves down, make the target and establish a firm platform from which to shoot.

    In this instance, it would have to be Greene’s shoulder.

    Sniper partners say the key to a successful spotter-shooter team is talking and breathing. As Callanan eyed the target, Greene watched the swaying of the bracken and told him as much as he could deduce about the strength and direction of the wind.

    And when they got their breathing in harmony, inhaling and exhaling in sync and then holding still to take the shot, Callanan squeezed the trigger.

    Five cracks rang out across the valley followed by four distinctly audible “pings” as the distant target was struck, just one bullet going astray.

    “Four out of five, that’s a great shoot,” said Weldon as the pair disappeared to the next stand. “They’re the top snipers that we have. . . Everyone thinks sniping is all about lying on a nice piece of grass and shooting. That’s not the fact of it. We all shoot from crazy, awful positions like that.”


    From Monday to Thursday, 36 competitors from defence forces in Ireland, the US, UK and Germany took part.

    From Monday to Thursday, 36 competitors from defence forces in Ireland, the US, UK and Germany took part in the 2017 Defence Forces International Marksmanship Skills Competition run in the Glen of Imaal, Co Wicklow, by the Infantry Weapons Wing (IWW) of the Defence Forces.

    Many of the international participants were from their respective countries’ special forces units, including US Navy Seals and the Deutsche Marine Sea Battalion reconnaissance company sniper platoon. From the UK, there were two infantry teams from the Royal Irish Regiment (RIR) 1 Battalion sniper platoon.

    Snipers and spotters

    Ireland’s anti-terrorist special forces unit, the Army Ranger Wing, also took part, as did about a dozen pairs of snipers and spotters from ordinary infantry and cavalry units around the country.

    The Army Rangers have earned considerable international standing in recent years, winning the 2015 US Sniper Competition run by the American military at Ford Benning in Georgia, the first foreign team to take both the international and overall categories.

    Army Rangers snipers kept a low profile in the Glen of Imaal, letting their shooting do the talking.

    Thursday was stress day – five shooting situations (they call them stands), each several hundred metres apart, to be completed within 30 minutes, testing accuracy and judgment under pressure. All under the gaze of the chief of staff, Vice Admiral Mark Mellett, the British and US military attachés and some reporters.

    “Nothing this week has been easy,” said Comdt Kenneth O’Rourke, chief umpire and chief instructor in the IWW. “They’re under pressure. Their heart rate’s up. We don’t see high scores at events like this.”

    At Stand 2, the pressure was palpable as two RIR member tried close-range pistol shooting at a static and a moving target – 10 bullets each; time limit was two minutes.

    The Texas Wheel (five metal spokes, each with a disc at the end) spun around when the first disc was shot off. . . and stayed spinning, allowing for just one more to be hit by the first soldier. The second soldier fared better with the Duelling Tree, shooting off all five metal discs sticking out of a metal upright at right angles.

    “Okay guys, that’s it,” said the stand umpire, “Move on.”

    Scenario

    At Stand 3, to which they ran fully kitted in body armour, the umpire explained the scenario hurriedly.

    “You’ve escaped enemy captivity. You have captured an enemy weapon. OK? You have 10 rounds in the magazine. Each person will fire five rounds from a standing, supported position. OK? Your target is, see the dogleg outside the river. . .

    “White target?” asked one soldier.

    “White target, yeah. As soon as you pick the weapon up, you have 45 seconds each in which to engage the target five times, standing supported. Understood. Okay?”

    On the ground is the enemy weapon, a sniper spotter rifle, unfamiliar to many and with the sighting systems removed, save for the pin hole for the shooter’s eye and tiny V at the end of the barrel removed, and the foregrip detached.

    Close by is a wooden makeshift tripod which would aid accuracy considerably but such is the urgency with which each team want to get shooting at the target that none notice it.

    Most teams rest the rifle on the shoulder or across the back of the spotter and try to hit the target. Anyone hit it, reporters ask the umpire. “Yep,” says, “and I think it was probably luck!”

    At Stand 4, a long-range shot, the sniper and spotter have 60 seconds to get in position, establish the range of their target, 534m away, and engage it. They have just two bullets – one in their main sniper rifle, a second in the back up if the first misses.

    Stand 5 is manned by two instructors from the Army Rangers who are out to test decision-making, judgment and marksmanship – under extreme time pressure.

    Vice Admiral Mellett addresses the competitors at the end of the day. “It is great to see this level of professionalism,” he says. “This is the fundamental skill of being a warrior – a man and his weapon and his ability to be accurate and to be precise and to be able to deliver that lethal effect. That is the difference between you and the man in the street.”

    ***

    The Army Ranger Wing was declared competition winner on Friday in both national and international categories. Sgt David Greene received the Sgt Steven McColgan Perpetual Trophy. McColgan, Greene’s former sniper team partner, died earlier this year after an illness.
    https://www.irishtimes.com/news/irel...ains-1.3139502

  30. #195
    Lt General apod's Avatar
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    Good video on the IKON from the competition.
    More media from the above.
    http://www.independent.ie/irish-news...-35883443.html
    Last edited by apod; 1st July 2017 at 11:13.
    "Let us be clear about three facts:First of all.All battles and all wars are won in the end by the Infantryman.Secondly the Infantryman bears the brunt of the fighting,his casualties are heavier and he suffers greater extremes of fatigue and discomfort than the other arms.Thirdly,the art of the Infantryman is less stereotyped and harder to acquire than that of any other arm".
    -- Field Marshall Earl Wavell.1948

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  32. #196
    Non Temetis Messor The real Jack's Avatar
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    Is it a mix of .338s and 7.62s at the mo with the .338 eventually phasing out the 7.62s?
    Everyone who's ever loved you was wrong.

  33. #197
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    Did Claire and her boyfriend Wealthy Wallace try scale the fence.

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  35. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by The real Jack View Post
    Is it a mix of .338s and 7.62s at the mo with the .338 eventually phasing out the 7.62s?
    The 338 is not a replacement for the 308, it's complementing it. Another tool in the arsenal, same goes for the FN. The 308's were all upgraded a few years ago so they will be around for a long time to come.

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  37. #199
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    Quote Originally Posted by sofa View Post
    Did Claire and her boyfriend Wealthy Wallace try scale the fence.
    Maybe provide a moving target?

    Good to see this.

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  39. #200
    Lt General apod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sofa View Post
    Did Claire and her boyfriend Wealthy Wallace try scale the fence.
    Now that I would pay good money to see considering who and what was INSIDE the fence.
    "Let us be clear about three facts:First of all.All battles and all wars are won in the end by the Infantryman.Secondly the Infantryman bears the brunt of the fighting,his casualties are heavier and he suffers greater extremes of fatigue and discomfort than the other arms.Thirdly,the art of the Infantryman is less stereotyped and harder to acquire than that of any other arm".
    -- Field Marshall Earl Wavell.1948

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