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  1. #26
    "Nice ass, Samson..." mutter nutter's Avatar
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    Irsh sniper's come 2nd in sniper concentration

    AREA SUPPORT UNIT GAGETOWN, New Brunswick – Snipers from around the world gathered for the 8th annual Canadian International Sniper Concentration hosted by the Infantry School at the Combat Training Centre, from September 13 to 22.

    Twenty-four teams, consisting of both military and civilian law enforcement snipers from Canada, France, Latvia, the Czech Republic, Ireland, Australia, Belgium, the United States and the United Kingdom participated in a gruelling ten-day, seventeen-event exercise designed to develop sniper skills and to maintain the proficiency of Canadian Army snipers.

    The teams were tested on advanced shooting techniques, communication skills, field firing, navigation, and stalking the enemy. Overall, this international event enabled teams to exchange ideas and techniques, share lessons learned and discuss new technology and equipment.

    "My job is to ensure that all my team leaders set up and run challenging and realistic training," said Warrant Officer George Williams, the Canadian Army's subject matter expert on sniper training.

    WO Williams was successful in judging obstacles negotiated by the competitors. Sniper teams crawled through swamps and simulated minefields, climbed a tower, slithered down a rope, and crept through a culvert, while battle-simulated explosives went off around them.

    Various training aids were also used to add realism to the event – rounds from a C6 machine gun cracked overhead; smoke grenades and trip flares constantly went off in an attempt to distract the competitors; targets popped up to test the snipers' speed; and battle-simulated
    A 4th Commando, Royal Australian Regiment sniper runs through a minefield safe lane.
    A 4th Commando, Royal Australian Regiment sniper runs through a minefield safe lane.
    casualties with stomach wounds were used to create real-time scenarios.

    Other roles for snipers
    When asked to comment about his role as a sniper, one Canadian soldier (identity protected for security reasons) stated that his trade has been misunderstood. "Snipers have been stereotyped for years," he said. "We are not just used to take out bad guys."

    WO Williams went on to explain the other roles that snipers perform.

    "Snipers can be employed in several different ways," said WO Williams. "In the front lines amongst friendly troops, as part of the attack; flank security; early warning; cut-off missions; information gathering; and calling in indirect fire."

    "They do these tasks quite well," WO Williams pointed out.

    And the winners are....
    When all the targets and points were tallied, the top team overall for the second consecutive year was from the Dwyer Hill Training Centre (DHTC). The DHTC team also won the top sniper trophy.

    The Ireland Defence Forces representatives took the prizes awarded to the top observer and pistol teams.

    The team from the 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI), captured the long-range award as well as a new award created this year – the top indirect fire team.

    A soldier from the 1st Battalion, PPCLI won the Sergeant Robert Short trophy for sniper professionalism.

    Article and photos by Sgt Todd Berry


    this seem's so much more impressive, after reading in an Cosantoir that they were up against JTF-2 the Australian 4TH rar commando's, Belgian army sniper instructer's. French airborne, Latvian special forces, US army sniper instructer's............I'm getting a strange feeling, like I can raise my chin........oh my God, I think it's pride...............so this is what it's like...........nice :tri: :tri:

  2. #27
    Canadian perspective
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    Yes I can attest to the fact that Canadian army snipers do not use the Lee Enfield nor have they used them in quite a number of years. The Inuit Rangers(Canadian Rangers) use them and are deadly shots with them. I cannot emphasize enough the deadly aspect.

  3. #28
    FSG
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    i thjink i seen a documentry on the tv before where they where using the same riffles from boats to kill seals that come on shore

  4. #29
    Canadian perspective
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    Not only Seals but Musk Ox, small whales, Caribou and the odd Russian that shows up unannounced.

  5. #30
    C/S
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goldie fish
    The best rifle ever produced. Ask any old soldier in the RDF about it and you could write the criticism on the back of a postage stamp.

    The British used it up to recently in 7.62mm as a sniper rifle.
    We had 2 on our display last Sunday. It was amazing to see a old FCA man over 80yrs old carry out arms drill as if it was yesterday. everyone wanted to handle them.
    it will be long, it will be hard, and there will be no withdrawl
    Winston churchill

  6. #31
    "Nice ass, Samson..." mutter nutter's Avatar
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    5th Annual International Sniper Competition

    Sniper Competition Results

    Army teams fared well among the 31 teams at the 5th Annual International Sniper Competition, which wrapped up Nov. 4 at Fort Benning, Ga. Competitors included troops from all U.S. military branches as well as Britain, Canada, Ireland, Israel and Scotland. Here’s how they placed.

    1 Staff Sgt. Jason Pedro (All Guard Sniper) and Staff Sgt. Randy Schnell (National Guard Sniper School).

    2 Staff Sgt. Nicholas Howard and Sgt. Sean Clark of 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division.

    3 Cpl. Zack Miller and Staff Sgt. Mathew Atkison of 2nd Battalion, 5th Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division.

    4 Tech. Sgt. Ray Kelly and Tech. Sgt. Mike Walker of Air Force Close Precision Engagement Course.

    5 2nd Battalion, The Royal 22e Regiment• of Canada.

    6 Staff Sgt. Derek Wise and Staff Sgt. Michael Spear of 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 25th Infantry Division.

    7 Spc. Gilbert Fernandez and Spc. Mark Peters of 1st Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division.

    8 Marine Corps Scout Sniper School.•

    9 Staff Sgt. Michael Rach and Spc. Robert Shoup of 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment.

    10 Sgt. John Hawes Jr. and Staff Sgt. Christopher Cunningham of 3rd Squadron, 71st Cavalry Regiment, 10th Mountain Division.

    11 1st Battalion, The Royal 22e Regiment• of Canada.

    12 3rd Battalion, The Royal 22e Regiment• of Canada.

    13 Spc. Derek Bennet and Sgt. Michael Hensely of 1st Battalion, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 172nd Infantry Brigade.

    14 Staff Sgt. Richard Crim and Senior Airman Terrick Turner of 786th Security Forces Squadron (Air Force).

    15 Sgt. James Brown and Sgt. Colin Handy of 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division.

    16 1st Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment• of Canada.

    17 1st Battalion, The Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry• of Canada.

    18 Elchanan Zucker and Doron Shamgar of Israeli Defense Forces.

    19 1st Battalion, The Royal 22e Regiment• of Canada.

    20 2nd Battalion, The Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry• of Canada.

    21 Tech. Sgt. Todd Reed and Master Sgt. Timothy Reed of Air Force Close Precision Engagement Course.

    22 Sgt. Joel Michlock and Spc. Isaiah Burkhart of 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment.

    23 Spc. Daniel Lobine and Sgt. Manykhampha Douangmala of 2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division.

    24 Capt. Ollie Clear and 1st Lt. Nick Hosback of Ireland.


    25 Sgt. Kevin French and Sgt. Joseph Fernandez of 3-325 82nd Airborne Division.

    26 Gregg Johnson and Ryan Massey of U.S. Border Patrol.

    27 Lt. Cpl. Joathan De Courcy and Lt. Cpl. Dwayne Thompson of 1st Battalion, Royal Scots (U.K.).

    28 Spc. Trevor Morgan and Spc. Ryan Metcalf of 3rd Battalion, 505th Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division.

    29 3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment• of Canada.

    30 Cpl. Jason Tilstone and Lt. Cpl. Ray Capila of 2nd Battalion, Royal Green Jackets (U.K.).

    31 3rd Battalion, The Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry• of Canada.

    • Team members asked not to be identified by name.

    Source: U.S. Army Sniper School

    24th ...up against tough competition

  7. #32
    Major General ODIN's Avatar
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    Well done to them
    What are you cackling at, fatty? Too much pie, that's your problem.

  8. #33
    Lieutenant happenin's Avatar
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    Class. Fare play to them. Good to see our boys holding their own. Any info on how they were tested/judged.
    Trouble, Trouble, I tried to chase trouble but its chasing me.
    Trouble, trouble, trouble with a capitol T
    do do do do do do do da do do do. etc etc......

  9. #34
    Closed Account Goldie fish's Avatar
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    In the international field thats nothing to be ashamed of.

  10. #35
    "Nice ass, Samson..." mutter nutter's Avatar
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    apperently the night before the competition there was a large fire that destroyed alot of the competing team's equipment and they had to use US army gear

  11. #36
    Closed Account Goldie fish's Avatar
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    Imagine if that happened at an all army?

    The tears?

    The weeping and grinding of teeth....


    The misery...

  12. #37
    Lieutenant happenin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mutter nutter
    apperently the night before the competition there was a large fire that destroyed alot of the competing team's equipment and they had to use US army gear
    It's a fix. A fix i tell you.
    Trouble, Trouble, I tried to chase trouble but its chasing me.
    Trouble, trouble, trouble with a capitol T
    do do do do do do do da do do do. etc etc......

  13. #38
    Sergeant Major Thorpe's Avatar
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    Well done Gents, you did well up against some good opponents there.
    Only the dead have seen the end of war - Plato

    "Where there is no guidance the people fall, but in abundance of counselors there is victory" Proverbs 11-14
    http://munsterfireandrescue.com

  14. #39
    CQMS fiannoglach's Avatar
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    9th Canadian International Sniper Competition Results

    Army teams fared well among the 30 teams at the 9th Canadian International Sniper Competition , which wrapped up in Sept at Gagetown Combat Training Centre, New Brunswick. Competitors included troops from all Canadian Infantry units as well as Police and RCMP. Latvia, France, Ireland, New Zealand and Belgium. Here’s how they placed:
    1. JTF2 Canadian SF
    2. SUV Latvia SF
    3. 22 Van Doos Canada
    4. Ireland 1
    5. Ireland 2

  15. #40
    CQMS fiannoglach's Avatar
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    Those two officers originally went to the competition as observers but were allowed to compete at the last moment, using US weapons and equipment........OSOK

  16. #41
    Sergeant Major Thorpe's Avatar
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    Congrats to both teams
    Only the dead have seen the end of war - Plato

    "Where there is no guidance the people fall, but in abundance of counselors there is victory" Proverbs 11-14
    http://munsterfireandrescue.com

  17. #42
    Lieutenant happenin's Avatar
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    Fare play. Glad to see the Irish can perform so well on the international scene.
    Trouble, Trouble, I tried to chase trouble but its chasing me.
    Trouble, trouble, trouble with a capitol T
    do do do do do do do da do do do. etc etc......

  18. #43
    Closed Account ZULU's Avatar
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    Dromahair man representing Ireland at International Sniper CompetitionPremium Article !Your account has been frozen. For your available options click the below button.
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    « Previous « PreviousNext » Next »View GalleryPublished Date: 18 September 2009
    By Staff Reporter
    Leitrim's Kieran McMahon is currently flying the flag for Ireland in Canada as he is representing the Irish Defence Forces at the Canadian International Sniper Competition. The competition which began on September 8 and continues until September 17 is being held at Canadian Forces Base, New Brunswick.
    The Irish Defence Forces are represented by a sniper team from O'Neill Barracks, Cavan attached to 'A' Company, 6 Infantry Battalion. The team consists of Cpl David Ryan (spotter) and Dromahair native, Pte Kieran McMahon (sniper) who won this year's
    ADVERTISEMENTDefence Forces sniper competition which was held last May.

    Also representing the Irish Defence Forces will be Lt. Michael Hosback and Sgt. Stephen O'Neill from the Infantry Weapons Wing (Curragh) who will be acting as Team Captain and Team Coach respectively.

    Twenty-seven teams are participating in this year's competition from Canada, USA, France, The Netherlands and Ireland. This includes a number of Police Sniper Teams from Canada and the USA.

    Teams participating initially spend two days training prior to competition in Canada and are then presented with a number of scenarios including unknown distance shoot; long range shoot; stalk; urban shoot; chaos shoot; alternative position shoot; night shoot and pistol shoot.

    The skills required of a sniper are not simply long distance shooting, but a range of high end individual soldier skills such as camouflage and concealment; stalking; navigation; communications; map reading; teamwork and a very high degree of physical fitness and discipline. The skills of a sniper demonstrate a high degree of commitment to one's profession and, in general, army snipers are good soldiers that set fine example to younger recruits.

    This is the sixth year the Defence Forces have competed in Canada and Defence Forces, Press Officer, Commandant Gavin Young believes, "Participation at international competitions in recent years has provided for an excellent training return which has resulted in the standard of sniping being raised considerably within the Defence Forces".




    The full article contains 328 words and appears in Leitrim Observer newspaper.
    Page 1 of 1

    Last Updated: 16 September 2009 2:19 PM
    Source: Leitrim Observer
    Location: Co Leitrim

    http://www.leitrimobserver.ie/news/D...-at.5648821.jp

  19. #44
    Closed Account ZULU's Avatar
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    Any word on Irish teams, if any at the US International Sniper Comp in Ft Bragg?

    A Marine team from Scout Sniper School (West) at Camp Pendleton, Calif., won the ninth annual U.S Army International Sniper Competition at Fort Benning, Ga., officials announced Friday.

    The event took place Oct. 14-22.

    This year, the teams were divided into two classes. The service class featured teams firing 7.62mm NATO or smaller rounds as a primary or secondary weapon system, and the open class was made up of teams firing rounds in a caliber larger than 7.62mm NATO.

    The Marines won the service class and were the overall winners. The team from A Company, 2nd Battalion, 46th Infantry Regiment, 194th Armor Brigade, from Fort Knox, Ky., won the open class.

    Competitors were tested in a wide range of skills including field firing, advanced marksmanship and nontraditional firing positions.

    The winners are:

    Overall

    •Team 3, Scout Sniper School (West), Camp Pendleton
    Service Class

    •1st Place: Team 3, Scout Sniper School (West), Camp Pendleton
    •2nd Place: Team 24, D Company, 2nd Battalion, Special Warfare Training Group, Fort Bragg, N.C.
    •3rd Place: Team 6, C Troop, 1st Battalion, 73rd Cavalry, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg
    Open Class

    •1st Place: Team 10, A Company, 2nd Battalion, 46th Infantry Regiment, 194th Armor Brigade, Fort Knox
    •2nd Place: Team 23, D Company, 2nd Battalion, Special Warfare Training Group, Fort Bragg
    •3rd Place: Team 21, U.S. Army Special Operations Command, Fort Bragg
    Last edited by ZULU; 31st October 2009 at 02:59.

  20. #45
    Closed Account ZULU's Avatar
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    ....
    31 sniper teams shooting for title of top marksmen at Fort Benning

    By LILY GORDON - lgordon@ledger-enquirer.com

    Ledger-Enquirer (Columbus, GA), Fri, Oct. 16, 2009


    Sharp shooters from around the world have converged on Fort Benning for the Ninth Annual U.S. Army International Sniper Competition.

    The competition, beginning its second day and running until Thursday, is designed to identify the world’s premier team of snipers. This year 31 teams are vying for the title of top marksmen.

    “We have snipers from the Marine Corps, the Air Force, the Army National Guard, the Army,” said Sgt. Mike Snyder with Fort Benning’s Sniper School. “We also have guys here from special operations and foreign teams from Spain, England and the Irish Defense Forces.”

    Snyder said there’s also a team each from the San Francisco SWAT Unit, the San Diego Police Department and the Massachusetts State Police Department.

    “The focus of the competition is to bring teams together to share battlefield lessons learned, provide training initiatives and ideas, and to compete tactically and technically,” said the Web site for the Army Sniper Association, the organization designs the contest.

    Staff Sgt. Livio Waits and his teammate, Sgt. Benjamin Soto, both with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Squadron, 11th Armored Calvary Regiment, traveled from California to see how their skills compare to those of world’s best riflemen.

    “The motivation to come is mainly the training we get out of it,” Waits said. “Getting to work with some of the best snipers in the world, you learn from them — kind of pick their brains and then actually at the same time kind of see where we stand.”

    A variety of skills will be tested during the next week. The winning team will be the one that demonstrates the highest level of proficiency in all tasks. They’ll earn a variety of gifts that have been donated to the Army Sniper Association.

    Waits and Soto said they most look forward to participating in the aerial shoot, scheduled for Wednesday beginning around 9 a.m. This event finds snipers shooting at targets from a hovering helicopter.

    One of the most taxing events in years past has been the stress shoot, which calls for the men to run a mile carrying all their gear before completing a shooting drill.

  21. #46
    Closed Account ZULU's Avatar
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    ....
    Sniper Competition Continues Today

    By Tammy Terry | Anchor

    WRBL-TV/DT CBS 3 (Columbus, GA), Monday, October 19, 2009

    FORT BENNING, Ga. – Shooters from across the globe will begin their fifth day of sharp shooting Oct. 19, vying for first place in the Ninth Annual U.S. Army International Sniper Competition. Sniper teams include both military and civilian law enforcement organizations.

    Sniper teams finished their fourth day of competition Oct. 18 during a live-fire stalk on Galloway Range. During this event, the shooters were required to move as close as possible to a target without being detected. Competitors concealed themselves into their surroundings wearing ghilie suits, which are camouflage clothing enhanced with natural foliage.

    Other completed events include a nighttime land navigation movement, unknown distance events and various other timed and untimed events.

    Military representatives from the U.S. include Army, Marine Corps and Air Force snipers. Ireland, Spain and Great Britain also have military sniper teams competing. Law enforcement teams include snipers from the Massachusetts State Police, San Diego Police Department and Los Angeles FBI.

    Spectators are invited to attend the following events Oct. 19-22:

    Oct. 19, 8 a.m. — Keep in Memory Shoot. Shooters are required to memorize specific targets from among various targets in a short period of time. They are then required to pick out the targets from a board of images. Maertens Range.

    Oct. 19, 3 p.m. – Shoot Out. This is a timed event with limited exposure to targets, requiring quick thinking and reaction by the competitors. Maertens Range.

    Oct. 20, 9 a.m. – Counter Sniper Shoot. Snipers must infiltrate a building in an urban setting while an enemy combatant tries to detect their presence. Shooters must take out the enemy without being detected. Buchannon Range.

    Oct. 20, 9 a.m. Combat Pistol. Competitors shoot pistols at multiple targets with multiple engagements from various firing positions. Krilling Range.

    Oct. 21, 8 a.m. – Final Shot. Snipers have a limited amount of time to hit a target at an unknown distance. They receive one bullet, and the event is a hit or miss scenario. Burroughs Range.

    Oct. 22, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. – Vendor shoot. The public is invited to shoot rifles and pistols displayed by various rifle vendors. Burroughs Range.

    Packets with information about the Ninth Annual U.S. Arm International Sniper Competition and directions to the ranges are available at the I-185 and Benning Road visitors’ centers.

  22. #47
    Closed Account ZULU's Avatar
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    ...
    Vince Little
    23 October, 2009 09:28:00 Font size:

    FORT BENNING, GA – One shot, one kill: It's the creed of every sniper.

    More than 30 two-man teams from around the globe put that battle cry to the test - minus any lethality in this instance - on Fort Benning's ranges during the ninth annual U.S. Army International Sniper Competition, which began Oct. 15 and ended Thursday.

    The field included duos from Ireland, Spain, Great Britain, the Air Force, Marine Corps and Army National Guard. SWAT teams from around the U.S. were represented, and there were state police tandems from Massachusetts and California.

    A wide range of skills were tested as competitors fired rifles and pistols at fixed and moving targets, from various distances and positions, both day and night. An aerial shoot was among the events and most required sharp communication between shooter and spotter.

    All the scenarios are relevant to real-world missions and operations, organizers said.

    "Every one of these training events can be related to something in combat," said Sgt. 1st Class Robert Roof, the head noncommissioned officer at the U.S. Army Sniper School. "They face moving targets, unknown distances, a defensive shoot, moving at night, communicating on target in the dialogue shoot. If they don't have communication between the two, they're never going to hit their target."

    Factors such as elevation and wind must be accounted for as snipers take aim at targets the size of a playing card from up 300 yards out in the "Dialogue Shoot."

    "The spotter is telling the sniper what data to put on his scope," said Master Sgt. Mike Snyder, the officer in charge of the Sniper School. "The sniper pulls the trigger, but the spotter is doing pretty much everything else. They have to work well together to score any points or hit their targets."

    In the "Shootout" and "Know Your Limits" events, competitors can score more points if they hit a 19.5-inch mark from 1,000 meters.

    Sgt. Nicholas Irving and Spc. Ryan Flager, both from 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, just returned from separate deployments to Afghanistan and Iraq, respectively. They had three days to prepare for their first appearance in the competition.

    "You have to be on your 'A' game," Flager said. "As soon as you screw up, the other team may be 50 points ahead.

    "It's a job not everybody can do. You do a lot more math than you ever thought you'd do. There's a lot more thinking involved ... We love this stuff, and this takes it to the next level."

    Irving, who's made two deployments as a sniper, said shooters can't always see the targets and that's why spotters are so crucial. The competition will improve his precision, he said.

    "Overseas, they rely on you to make the key shots," he said. "You can see more than anybody else."

    The event also allows snipers to learn from each other and share different ideas.

    "I was here two years ago and it's very difficult, very technical shooting," said Sgt. Uel Fisher of the Irish Defence Forces. "By coming here, we're picking up tips on procedures currently used in Iraq and Afghanistan."

    His partner, Sgt. Tommy Campbell, agreed.

    "It offers a way for us to train up our own snipers, while also learning the lessons for deploying overseas," he said.


    Staff Sgt. Brandon House and Staff Sgt. Jeffrey Haskin, both of the Arkansas National Guard, both instructors at the Army National Guard Sniper School in Little Rock, Ark., were among several first-time competitors.

    "Being in the schoolhouse, you don't get to train as much ... The events are not difficult. It's just a matter of slowing down and knocking off the rust," Haskin said.

    And staying on the same page, House said: "It takes good game planning. You've got to be able to talk to each other if you want to be successful here."

  23. #48
    CQMS fiannoglach's Avatar
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    AFAIK, the irish won Best Foreign Team but finished twenty something overall.

  24. #49
    Closed Account ZULU's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info.

  25. #50
    irish sniper
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    The irish team from the 28 bn came 9th in the service class and 16th overall out of 31 teams

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