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Thread: OPV Replacement

  1. #251
    Tim Horgan Goldie fish's Avatar
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    Looks Tug-ish.

    Bow and stern thrusters?

    Looks a bit short.
    Any more details?


    Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

  2. #252
    Tim Horgan Goldie fish's Avatar
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ST-610_patrol_vessel
    Length: 47.2m
    Beam: 10.3m
    Displacement: 700 tonnes
    Speed: 17 knots
    Bollard pull: 20+ ton
    Engines: 2000kW (diesel electric), 1 bow thruster
    Gun: Probably 20mm

    On November 24, 2004 the Norwegian Coast Guard signed contract for five new patrol vessel of the ST-610 type. They will be delivered 12-14 months after the contract was signed. The vessels will be leased for 15 years. These purpose-built vessels will replace the five oldest vessels in the inner coast guard (No:indre kystvakt). They will provide significantly improved capabilities in all regards compared to the vessels they will replace. This includes seaworthiness (they are larger), towing capacity, fire fighting and environmental protection (collecting oil spills). The aft deck is for winch only (not for helicopter landing).



    Their Larger vessel is more appealing for our purposes.
    http://www.mil.no/multimedia/archive...uar_68197a.pdf


    Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

  3. #253
    CQMS Dogwatch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwatch View Post
    Here's an example of one of five hulls that the Norwegian Coastguard have built. They use two crews, 3 weeks on 3 weeks off, ship returns after 3 weeks, crews handover & straight back out to sea.



    On November 24, 2004 the Norwegian Coast Guard signed contract for five new patrol vessel of the ST-610 type. They will be delivered 12-14 months after the contract was signed. The vessels will be leased for 15 years. These purpose-built vessels will replace the five oldest vessels in the inner coast guard (No:indre kystvakt). They will provide significantly improved capabilities in all regards compared to the vessels they will replace. This includes seaworthiness (they are larger), towing capacity, fire fighting and environmental protection (collecting oil spills). The aft deck is for winch only.
    Here's the previous post on these vessels, still would be very capable vessels, maybe as an inshore vessel (CPV type)?

  4. #254
    CQMS Dogwatch's Avatar
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    Just beat me to it goldie!!!

  5. #255
    CQMS Dogwatch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwatch View Post
    Or a bigger version:


    Specifications:
    Displacement: 6500 tonnes
    Length: 103.7 m (340.2ft) overall
    89 m (292 ft) waterline
    Beam: 19.1 m (62.6 ft)
    Height: 8.3 m (27.2 ft)
    Draft: 6.5 m (21.3 ft)
    Power: 4 x 3390 kW BRG-8 diesel generators
    Propulsion: 2 x 5 MW Azipod electric motors
    Speed: 17.5 kn
    Range: ?
    Complement: ?
    Aircraft: Capacity for two helicopters;
    one Lynx carried initially, NH90 from 2007
    Radar: EADS TRS-3D /16 ES with IFF
    Gun: Bofors 57 mm, 12.7 mm
    Cost: 575 million NOK (80 million USD), radar and helicopter not included

    As previously posted!

  6. #256
    Tim Horgan Goldie fish's Avatar
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    This was the one I was thinking of.



    The vessel is a VS 794 CGV design, developed in close cooperation between owner and yard, designed by Vik-Sandvik of Fitjar, Norway. The vessel will be the first coastguard vessel with gas-driven propulsion system.
    The vessel is designed for towing- and rescue operations, oil recovery and fire fighting. The length will be 93 m, breadth 16,6 m and the bollard pull 100 tonnes.


    Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

  7. #257
    Tim Horgan Goldie fish's Avatar
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    More details on Norways view of things....

    http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/...nity/index.php

    For most countries, coast guard duties consist of inshore search and rescue, security patrols and environmental protection, and are performed by smaller vessels, Many are even operated by civilian agencies. Not so for the Norwegian coast guard, which is a branch of the Norwegian Navy and operates in Norway's entire Economic Exclusion Zone (EEZ) and protection zones, a total of 2.2 million square kilometers as well-known known for the North Sea's and Arctic's harsh conditions as it is for its oil platforms and rich fisheries.


    To perform these duties, a whole series of new Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPVs) ranging in size from 700-6,500 tons have been developed by Norwegian designers over the last decade. The traditional corvette designs were avoided - instead, the new ships were based on 30-40 years of experience designing civilian offshore support and fishing vessels for the North Sea. Lately, as advanced OPVs have begun riding a crest of popularity and the littoral threat continues to rise, the Norwegian branch of Rolls Royce has found itself designing coastal and environmental protection vessels for France, Spain and India; they are considered strong candidates with other countries as well.

    http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/...iciency_lg.jpg
    KV Barethshav concept
    (click to view full)This article outlines the background of these vessels, and describes two of their main designers, the aforementioned Rolls Royce Marine with their successful exports, and Vik-Sandvik AS, who were recently awarded the contract to design one of the world's first hybrid-powered naval vessels.


    Norwegian OPVs: The History


    KV Svalbard
    (click to view full)In the aftermath of the Cold War, as funding slipped from the military's budgets, the Norwegian Coast Guard were forced to think in new ways how to handle procurement and operations. The solution was to expand a model that had been used since the 1970s - to lease vessels from private companies that would handle procurement and maintenance, and then equip them as OPVs for the coast guard.

    The difference would be that instead of being converted trawlers and supply vessels, they would be custom built by civilian designers and shipyards to the demands of the Norwegian Coast Guard. The hope was that they would provide vastly enhanced capabilities, while keeping costs at an acceptable level. In fact, this has been the case with every vessel built for the Norwegian Coast Guard in the last 10 years, except for the 6,500 ton "KV Svalbard."

    Nornen Class mini-OPV
    These vessels soon developed a distinguishable profile as well, dismissing the corvette-like designs used by many other countries, as the designers drew on their past experiences from designing for the North Sea, resulting in vessels emphasizing flexibility, stability and cost efficiency.

    Remoy Shipping and Remoy management, two Norwegian companies owned by two members of the same family, currently owns and maintains half of the Norwegian Coast Guard fleet as a result of this policy. The vessels are manned by a mix of civilian support staff and operational personnel from the military, with the exception of the KV Svalbard ice-breaker/OPV/ support vessel which is a wholly military ship.

    Norwegian OPVs: The Designers & Ships


    UT-512: smoke on the water...The following are two of the many companies that have taken part in designing the new vessels.

    The Ship Technology division of Rolls Royce Marine based in Ulsteinvik, Norway has long been established as one of the foremost designers of offshore support vessels for the oil industry, with more than 500 vessels built of their so-called "UT” designs over the last 30 years. Based on this experience, they have designed the latest addition to the Norwegian Coast Guard, the KV Harstad, based on a design named the 40 mm Bofors naval gun

    According to the Norwegian Coast Guard, the vessel is also specially designed to perform submarine rescue.

    According to Rolls Royce, what makes their vessels unique is their emphasis on stability and safety, both during transit and during operations. The hull and the machinery are designed with emphasis on providing the best possible stability and power even under extreme sea states and resistance. In addition, all the ships systems are built with redundancy in mind, for instance by having two propellers with independent propulsion. These are lessons learned from offshore operations in the North Sea, where systems failure in a critical moment while operating close to oil installations could have disastrous consequences.

    The second designer, Vik-Sandvik AS, is a fairly new as a designer of OPVs. What they do have is a long record of designing advanced trawlers and various civilian offshore support vessels. The company started in 1975 in the small community of Fitjar outside Bergen, and has continued to expand until today when consists of a group of companies in Norway, Poland and China, and numbering some 200 employees.

    According to the company themselves, some 60 vessels designed by them or their affiliates are under construction world wide.

    On the 21st of October 2005, Vik - Sandvik AS and Remoy Management signed a contract with the Norwegian Coast Guard for the delivery of a two new coast guard vessels, to be named the KV Barentshav and the KV Sortland. The first ship of the new design is to be delivered in 2007. Like the UT-512s, the new The VS-794 ships will measure about 3,100 tonnes and have approximately 100 tons of bollard pull, making them capable of functioning as a tug boat for much larger vessels. Though no details have been released as of yet, the vessels are likely to be equipped with the same kind of rescue and environmental protection equipment as the one designed by Rolls Royce, and a naval gun of roughly the same configuration.

    But the similarities end there.

    These latest vessels represent a major step forward by being one of the world's first naval vessels to use a hybrid propulsion system based on diesel and liquid natural gas (LNG). The hull is also built along the lines of a North Sea trawler, in order to maximize speed and fuel-efficiency. This allows the vessels to perform up to a speed of approx. 16.5 knots using gas generators, up to 18.5 knot mechanically, and above 18.5 knots in hybrid mode.

    This new propulsion also enables the vessels to reduce CO2 emissions by 25% and NOx emissions by 90%; according to one of the chief designers, a 25% reduction in fuel expenses can also be expected. This would make the vessel considerably more efficient to run, and clearly marks the entrance of environmental concerns in naval designs. As shown by several previous DID articles, energy concerns are on the rise within militaries worldwide, and experiences from vessels such as these might prove valuable when creating the propulsion systems to power future naval vessels.

    The new vessels follow the global trend toward increased automation and smaller crew sizes with a standard crew of 16, while its facilities can support a maximum crew of up to 40 members. This allows even further savings on operating costs.

    These innovations will certainly be highly touted as a potential edge in future competitions, such as the one for the future OPV of Iceland that is to be decided this December 2006. Rolls Royce has confirmed that they will be a candidate.

    In addition, September 2006 will see Europe's first conference dedicated to Offshore Patrol Vessels in London, England, further recognizing OPVs' growing importance. This DefenceIQ conference will feature the Norwegian experiences and OPVs both in workshops and lectures, and will give their builders' in-depth views of their new and future role within Europe's defenses.

    http://www.mil.no/sjo/kv/start/english/
    Oddly enough KV Nordkapp looks exactly like the P30 class was supposed to.


    Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

  8. #258
    Aha: Death=Preconception Lordinajamjar's Avatar
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    Interesting that they can maintain such a large number of vessels and aircraft with personnel size similar to the Irish Navy.

    # The Norwegian Coast Guard consists of 21 vessels, 6 helicopters, 2 aircraft and 800 personnel.

  9. #259
    CQMS Dogwatch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeV View Post
    Niamh wouldn't be classed a major vessel, by anyones standards, a vessel such as those discuss here would be.

    Was Rotterdam not offshore.
    Rotterdam did not arrive off Monrovia until Dec 2003, when the QRF arrived. it was there to provide the medical facilities, when the Irish & Swedish troops arrived.

  10. #260
    CQMS Dogwatch's Avatar
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    Faroese Coastguard Vessel

    http://www.shipspotting.com/uploads/photos/290723.jpg

    The BRIMIL, which is flying under the Faroes Flag. This ship also has a towing capability, seems quite similar to the Norwegian CG vessels.

  11. #261
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    According to Jane's IDR, TKMS, the owners of B+V and Kockums, announced two new concept OPVs at MECON 2006 in August.

    The Guardian, for policing and civil missions, 1,850 tonnes, length 80m, main gun up to 40mm, top speed 20 - 25kts, crew of 30 with accomodation for an additional 60, 6 berth hospital plus 16 berth casualty station, a 250sq m cargo handling area for up to 12 20ft containers, and a helicopter deck capable of handling a 12 tonne helicopter with a telescopic hanger. Cost approx €30m.

    The Sentinel for naval and policing missions, 2,000 tonnes, length 85.2m, main gun up to 76mm, top spees 25kts, range 4,000 n miles at 12 kts cruising speed (may be increased by adding containerised fuel), crew of 36 plus berths for 38 more, up to 120 troops/refugees may be housed in extra containerised accomodation, a hospital area, and a flight deck for a 12 tonne helicopter. The Sentinel is derived from the Meko 100.

    IAS

  12. #262
    Banned User Pod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ias View Post
    The Sentinel for naval and policing missions, 2,000 tonnes, length 85.2m, main gun up to 76mm, top spees 25kts, range 4,000 n miles at 12 kts cruising speed (may be increased by adding containerised fuel), crew of 36 plus berths for 38 more, up to 120 troops/refugees may be housed in extra containerised accomodation, a hospital area, and a flight deck for a 12 tonne helicopter. The Sentinel is derived from the Meko 100.

    IAS
    any indication of the cost on this one?

  13. #263
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    No, it only quoted the cost of the Guardian. I assume because of the modularity of the Sentinel, costs are hard to quantify.

    IAS

  14. #264
    Banned User Pod's Avatar
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    The Sentinel sounds like a far more realistic alternative than an MRV in the MEKO 200 class both interms of cost and manpower. Mind you whats the liklihood of the package being able to operate the helio with the containerised storage onboard? Not very in the spec provided would be my thought . Any other opinons on this?

  15. #265
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    I see that TKMS have dropped the 200 MRV from their website, would they do this if they were in negotiations to sell one or am I just being a pessimist?

    IAS

  16. #266
    Tim Horgan Goldie fish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ias View Post
    I see that TKMS have dropped the 200 MRV from their website, would they do this if they were in negotiations to sell one or am I just being a pessimist?

    IAS

    No.
    Since the recent "merger" ot ThyssenKrupp, Kockums & Blohm und Voss, they are rejigging their website. I cannot find an English version without some searching..
    The Blohm and Voss website was where the MRV was located, it now redirects you to Thyssen Krupp Marine Systems.

    Not all of the ship types of each company in the umbrella group are included on the new website
    http://www.tk-marinesystems.de/index...t=30&subprod=1


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  17. #267
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    As it takes a couple of years+ to actually build ships, are there any expectations for an announcment at Euronaval 2006 which starts today?

    IAS

  18. #268
    Tim Horgan Goldie fish's Avatar
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    Modern process have shortened build times dramatically. The Biggest delay is usually the Tendering and design process. This has been underway for some time.

    I have not heard that announcements will be made at Euronaval, however I do understand that a delegation of Irish Naval officers will be there.

    If any announcement will be made we should have it here. However no announcement is expected. The minister would be the one to make an announcement. If he was going(which he isn't) then you would expect something.

    Watch this space.


    Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

  19. #269
    CQMS Dogwatch's Avatar
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    CPV Replacement?

    Maybe this is looking too far ahead, but Damen in Holland have some good examples of short range patrol craft, similar to the role filled by the CPV's. Suitable for the NS?



    DAMEN STAN PATROL 5209
    Length o.a.
    52.00 m
    Beam o.a.
    8.75 m
    Depth at sides
    4.50 m
    Daughter craft
    7- 10 m RIB's, inboard diesel/waterjet or 12 m Interceptors
    Power range
    5000- 10000 bkW
    Speed range
    23.0 - 30.0 knots
    Hull construction
    Steel
    Superstructure construction
    Aluminium



    DAMEN STAN PATROL 5109
    Length o.a.
    51.30 m
    Beam o.a.
    9.10
    Depth at sides
    4.70 m
    Daughter craft
    7- 10 m RIBs, inboard/diesel waterjet or 12 m Interceptors
    Power range (bkW)
    5000 - 10000
    Speed range
    25.0 - 30.0 knots
    Hull construction
    Steel
    Superstructure construction
    Aluminium

  20. #270
    CQMS Dogwatch's Avatar
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    Portugese OPV & CPV being built









    These vessels are being built in Portugal at present.
    Last edited by Dogwatch; 31st October 2006 at 11:20.

  21. #271
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    The Biggest delay is usually the Tendering and design process. This has been underway for some time.
    GF, just for clarity, does this mean the formal tendering process has already commenced, and therefore there will be no further need for a competitive tendering process just the issueing of contracts?

    IAS

  22. #272
    Tim Horgan Goldie fish's Avatar
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    No.


    Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

  23. #273
    CQMS Dogwatch's Avatar
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    More OPV designs

    I think we posted this design before. It's the Chilean Navy OPV,designed by a German company & will be powered by Wartsila engines (smaller kW Power output than P51 class though).



    Length over all:80,60 m
    Beam moulded:13,00 m
    Draught:3,80 m
    Displacement:1.850 t
    Special Features
    Anti rolling tank, Helicopter platform, Deck crane SWL 4 t at 10 m, Two service boats (RIB's) under single point davits with wave compensation, Water ballast 250 m³, Modular platform concept for simple integration of different combat systems, x-shaped hull to reduce radar cross section. Special rescue zone.

    Anti rolling tank - very good feature.



    Their 60m PV looks like a big Sandown Class MCMV, is also a bit slower than CPV's.

    Length over all:60,00 m
    Beam moulded:10,20 m
    Draught:2,60 m
    Displacement:605 t
    Speed:22 knots
    Range: 2.000 miles at 12 knots

    A greater range of designs are at the following link:

    http://www.fassmer.de/english/produk...schiffbau.html

  24. #274
    Teuton Foot Soldier ZULU's Avatar
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    Is it a Water filled Anti rolling tank system or a rack mounted counter weight with canards?
    "The Question is not: how far you will take this? The Question is do you possess the constitution to go as far as is needed?"

  25. #275
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    It seems after the last month or so, that whoever said the navy needed bigger ships probably had a point!
    Fail to prepare....prepare to FAIL!

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