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AlanF
20th December 2007, 21:56
Removed by Owner

hptmurphy
20th December 2007, 23:06
Guy on look out the port bridge wing singing away to himself ..nice dark nite very quiet was ina world of his won...total safe in his ming,,,the standby man exits the bridge through the other door creeps around to the side where the look out is,,graps him by the anle and screams omething....

lookout shakes out and has to be relived from duty

hptmurphy
20th December 2007, 23:10
I was on QM on 12-4 and decide to give the sentry on the bridge alittle fight.

Ip the passage waist, climb on to the gun deck..up on the ammo hoist ..up the ladder to the rails under the bridge window ..quick .. he's in the capatains chair.. so back down palce torch undr chi pops up again to frighten the shite out of the sentry to find my self looking down the barrel of an FN..nearly fell off the walkway to the deck beloow.. Cullinane ya bastard you could nave killed me!

Test Pilot
21st December 2007, 10:38
Gawd here we go now,stories !

Went on board an Irish trawler one night while on fishery protection patrol about 150 miles off the sw coast. The trawler was known to us and was above board, according to our records. But we were just putting in the time.

When I went to the bridge, the nets had been shot and the vessel was on auto pilot and heading west. The crew had gone to the bunks to grab a few hours. There was a young guy sitting in the skippers seat keeping watch, but had fallen asleep. He was out of it, because when I announced my prescence there was no reaction.

The log was on the chart table and appeared in order. As this was the first shot of the nets, there was no fish on board. Normally I would sign the log and stamp it with an official stamp, which I did. I also re inked the stamp and very carefully stamped the sleeping watch keepers forehead and cheeks with 'L.E Orla - Naval Service'. It was a perfect paint job! Wish I had my camera then. I then quietly slipped off the vessel and disappeared in to the night.

I often wondered what happened when the skipper came to the bridge and enquired if all was quiet and a some what dozey, painted qm saying something like 'No all quiet Skip, nothing happened'.:biggrin: :biggrin:

yooklid
21st December 2007, 16:03
Fcuking Brilliant.

Goldie fish
21st December 2007, 17:53
Now thats a story!!

golden rivet
21st December 2007, 18:45
Now thats a story!!:biggrin: great,,,,,,, one ships captain raided lobster pots and replaced each lobster(3 of them ) with a bottle of whiskey. imagine the face of the man hauling the pots ,, holy sh** its a miracle..

GoneToTheCanner
21st December 2007, 19:04
Hi Test pilot
brilliant...I bet that story didnt get back to Killybegs......GR, he was a well-off captain if he could spare three bottles of strong drink.....we had a female Officer on Orderly Officer one night who had a habit of following the guard as they went out on patrol around the camp.She used to try and spring a trap on them at a point where they were supposed to radio back to the guardroom.She was spotted by the patrol and the NCO evaded her and crept up behind her, as she waited in cover.The first thing she knew about his presence was the muzzle of the FN in her ear.Silly girl tried it again another night, checking to see if the guy on the beat was alert.The whole camp was wise to her tricks so every footstep she took was monitored.When she crept up to the guardhouse,she found a Gustav muzzle, up close and personal. The surprises stopped after that.
regards
GttC

Goldie fish
21st December 2007, 19:23
One wonders what kind of idiot decides its a good idea to sneak up on a person with a loaded weapon...

yooklid
21st December 2007, 19:38
One wonders what kind of idiot decides its a good idea to sneak up on a person with a loaded weapon...

Just thinking that myself. Not entirely sure of the total facts but a similar situation happened to my brother way back in the day when he was on an FCA camp. Except that he was on a 24hr, and two PDF officers decided to drop by in the middle of the night and check out weapons WITHOUT informing the guard commander. My brother, who was just a slip of a lad at the time (ah the days when they never checked your birth cert) forgot the usual challenge and said something along the lines of "IF YOU MOVE I'LL BLOW YOUR FCUKING HEADS OFF!"

The two heads tried to pull my brother through the wringer only to get a bollocking from their own CO. See - there is some justice out there.

Test Pilot
21st December 2007, 21:01
"IF YOU MOVE I'LL BLOW YOUR FCUKING HEADS OFF!"

The two heads tried to pull my brother through the wringer only to get a bollocking from their own CO. See - there is some justice out there.

Thank God for some sensible Co's. I had a few occasions to be on the mat, in the early years, but due to commonsense CO's, I was let walk! But thats another story. (may put that in print later).

I was thinking today, that it's only coming out now what realy happened many years ago, as we were in sight of no one, as we worked. Some of my ex CO's must be having a laugh now at what went on - I hope so. Some are still in the service and others are in civie street. We still cross paths and have a great respect for each other. And always will. If you are looking in, A Happy Christmas to you all.

yooklid
21st December 2007, 21:59
I think my brother was only 15 or at the time (early 80s). So that just added insult to injury.

golden rivet
21st December 2007, 22:19
Hi Test pilot
brilliant...I bet that story didnt get back to Killybegs......GR, he was a well-off captain if he could spare three bottles of strong drink.....we had a female Officer on Orderly Officer one night who had a habit of following the guard as they went out on patrol around the camp.She used to try and spring a trap on them at a point where they were supposed to radio back to the guardroom.She was spotted by the patrol and the NCO evaded her and crept up behind her, as she waited in cover.The first thing she knew about his presence was the muzzle of the FN in her ear.Silly girl tried it again another night, checking to see if the guy on the beat was alert.The whole camp was wise to her tricks so every footstep she took was monitored.When she crept up to the guardhouse,she found a Gustav muzzle, up close and personal. The surprises stopped after that.
regards
GttC:smile: that was in the good old days of duty free 5 pound a bottle of black bush:biggrin:

yooklid
21st December 2007, 22:23
:smile: that was in the good old days of duty free 5 pound a bottle of black bush:biggrin:

Oh those days! Why not give the correct price of 5 pounds 3 shillings and 6 pence

golden rivet
21st December 2007, 23:30
Oh those days! Why not give the correct price of 5 pounds 3 shillings and 6 pence Way before your time..

hptmurphy
22nd December 2007, 00:44
First time as guard commander.. was a bag with a PDF guard.. some one tried to pull a fast one and never had looked up my CV.. turns up I was doing guards when they were being concieved.. and that was only the OOD.. Corporal I don't know how to dismount using the FN..Sir would you like to have me teach you?... should I show you the Steyr as well?

Like to hear the one about the guard commander who had the barrel of the gustaf removed and the OOD never coped on?

The one about the guy who was handed over to the guard commadner after being arrested by the GS....for child molestation....allegedlly....wonder he made it through the night!

Alan F.. your mate Johnny Brit was great to go on guard with as he loved #2 beat ...alone all night...

yooklid
22nd December 2007, 01:24
Way before your time..

Meh.... I still remember finding the big old pennies occasionally - I'm not that young! :smile:

AlanF
22nd December 2007, 20:54
Removed by Owner

golden rivet
22nd December 2007, 22:24
On Guard over on Spike Island 1983, Blue Alert, few days before Christmas, I was due to head home on leave the following day before Christmas Eve.

In those days Guard Duty on Spike was 1 in 3 which was pretty tough.

During the Blue Alert a second beat was set up on over the main gate to the fort. No shelter what so ever and on the highest point on the Island. I was on this beat freezing cold, feet like blocks of ice. I decided to sit down on the ground and use one of the pillars to shield me from the wind, next thing I knew was that the OOD and DPO were beside me. Needless to say I was relived from duty and put under close service custody arrest.

Next morning I found myself on the mat. The CO heard the evidence from both OOD and DPO. My excuse was flimsy to say the least but because the charge was asleep whilst on duty and neither the OOD or DPO could prove it I got off Scot free.

Have to admit to this day I am amazed that I did not do time in the Digger for that one. a spooky spot did standard course there, some areas at night did have a presence there whether people believe or not spike would change your mind as a lot of people died there as in fact it was a concentration camp for people awaiting deportation

GoneToTheCanner
23rd December 2007, 02:23
HI GR
I've done a few beats in places where the hair on the back of the neck stood on end the whole time.Something was there and good oul instinct was reacting.Ft Davis' gate post is one chilly spot,mentally and physically.
Goldie, she wasn't the only one to try it on and rarely did they succeed.It happened on occasion that the OO or BOS was pinned to the spot by a zealous or stupid beat man with a cocked rifle.Certainly, in the Don, weapons were discharged, either by default or design, by members of the guard when persons tried to sneak up on them.
regards
GttC

golden rivet
25th December 2007, 12:04
Heres one for the day thats in it.. burkie once won a live turkey in the westbourne bar draw and went home on the train with just the neck sticking out of the box. on the train it was a laugh as the turkey gobbled away and it then started to peck at a womans sandwich and generally acting up. the place was in uproar as burkie had a glass of beer and mr turkey took a drop of that too, anyway rumour has it that the ass went out of the box in galway and the turkey done a legger..

hptmurphy
25th December 2007, 16:35
Seanie Burke?...

golden rivet
25th December 2007, 18:10
Seanie Burke?... Thats the man

golden rivet
25th December 2007, 18:42
ok out with it what did everyone get for christmas.. jocks,, socks,, vouchers,, etc,,and include the unusual

hptmurphy
25th December 2007, 20:25
I got what I asked for sweet FA oh except my daughter did by me a ticket to go with her to a concert im march.

Seanie was one of those who when you met him you knew it was going to involve at least one hangover.

Damn fine Leading Seaman.

Goldie fish
25th December 2007, 21:17
Murf: Numan?

hptmurphy
25th December 2007, 22:23
Yup 4th march Gary Numan Replicas 2008 tour at the Tripod in Dublin

moggy
26th December 2007, 15:12
Yup 4th march Gary Numan Replicas 2008 tour at the Tripod in Dublin

i got the book at the moment out of range sold out of easons a week before christmas
the author keeps mentioning the dauphin on the ship - you then realise the book is all fiction - not a bad book

GoneToTheCanner
26th December 2007, 16:01
Hi Murph
I once sat in Gary Numan's Harvard.I couldn't give a shit about his alleged music but the guy really lit up when it came to talking aeroplanes.
regards
GttC

hptmurphy
26th December 2007, 20:09
I have the book just can't seem to get around to starting it.

Yeah got to sit in same aeroplane.. have always liked the music The aviation side of things had always been a hobby.

Bear in mind the aviation side of Gary Numan is ancient history.

Back to the book...I suppse its a little surreal people writing about something we lived in and know the realities of how it was and the shit that went with it and no amount of glossing over can make some aspects of it lok good.. nor would they amke for good written entertainment

. Hard to read the fiction when you've lived the fact.

Test Pilot
27th December 2007, 11:48
I agree, hard to make a start on the book as its fiction. Will have a go later.
By the way, Murph, - Gary who?

golden rivet
27th December 2007, 14:49
gary glitter

hptmurphy
27th December 2007, 23:11
GR ..your toilet habits and my taste in music are hardly equitable.....


TP lol even you aren't that old try google

clean it again
28th December 2007, 09:05
friend of mine in a unmarked garda car. with on board camera.
not quick enough a the green light. car behind flashes light /horn etc
top of the range car over takes garda car. rolls down window and give the one finger salute as you do to slow cars. break next red light, undertakes on a moterway.

and to top it all off, uses hard shoulder to get pass traffic hold up

stop car


wait for it

pissed , no driving lience , daddies car, 16 years old

parents say it was not their son driving, report it stolen

Choice
1 continue to say car is stolen, kid done for robbing
2.withdrawn report, waste garda time etc

The best thing is that they had the best legal man money could buy
parents shown video, legal man breaks down in tears with laughter.
after family for 10 mins keep saying is not my son that could have done that.
good school, upbringing and the rest of the shite

GoneToTheCanner
28th December 2007, 14:39
Hi CIA
Avariation on the it-couldn't-have-been-our-son-wot-dunnit theme; my brother and his friend were walking home after being out for a quiet few sociables when they were jumped by five yobs, who put the brother's friend into a coma and gave my brother a good hiding.Fortunately, other citizens intervened and chased off the scumbags and gave very good descriptions to the gardai.All five were caught and fessed up after the usual initial period of denial.three of the five sets of parents flatly denied that their sons had been involved, despite the sons admitting being involved to the Gardai.eventually, it was down to one mother, who swore blind that her Johnny had nothin' to do with it, despite witnesses and the corroboration of the son himself.In the end, the boy in the coma came out of it unharmed and no charges were ever laid.
regards
GttC

Goldie fish
28th December 2007, 14:45
Jaysus lads, what does this have to do with the naval service?

golden rivet
28th December 2007, 15:38
Hi CIA
Avariation on the it-couldn't-have-been-our-son-wot-dunnit theme; my brother and his friend were walking home after being out for a quiet few sociables when they were jumped by five yobs, who put the brother's friend into a coma and gave my brother a good hiding.Fortunately, other citizens intervened and chased off the scumbags and gave very good descriptions to the gardai.All five were caught and fessed up after the usual initial period of denial.three of the five sets of parents flatly denied that their sons had been involved, despite the sons admitting being involved to the Gardai.eventually, it was down to one mother, who swore blind that her Johnny had nothin' to do with it, despite witnesses and the corroboration of the son himself.In the end, the boy in the coma came out of it unharmed and no charges were ever laid.
regards
GttC no more voilent stories we are a peaceful bunch,, try beebo lads

YankeeHotelFoxtrot
28th December 2007, 20:27
How about a seaman off Aoife falling asleep in the little park at the top of the pier in Dun Laoire only to awaken with a "homer sexual" feeling his leg up. He chased him right down the quay wall and where did the "homer" run only right up the gangway looking for help from the guy chasing him. Man, did he get a shock when the seaman walked up the gangway after him!:biggrin:

spider
29th December 2007, 20:24
About 10 years ago.....

I was crew on one of a pair of 18' boats entering Belfast harbour via the channel at about 4am. Dark.

We were doing about 20 knots, and were in no hurry to get in. Very correctly on the starboard side of the channel, and keeping a watch out for shipping.

I noticed what at first appeared to be a green orb, then a red orb, flying through the sky a few hundred meters behind us. Whats that, thinks Spider. A helicopter ? Aeroplane ?

Then the penny dropped. It was a certain high speed ferry (no names).

:eek: And it was going very, very fast.

Brown trouser time.

But no problem we decide, just open up the throttle and we'll motor in well ahead of it.

As briefed, on passing a certain marker, I switched my handheld VHF onto the harbour working channel, normally quiet at this time.

Not tonight.

" Belfast Harbour this is ****, I have no idea who these idiots are, but they are zig-zagging in front of my vessel, and we have just performed a crash stop in the channel ".

:eek:

Swiftly followed by " ***** **, get out of the way of the **** ". :eek: :eek: :eek:

Well we were'nt in his way. Apparently, his radar was showing the Captain that we were zig-zagging in front of him. We were'nt, apparently the radar was showing false images, possibly caused by our speed,formation and (the radar beams) bouncing off the very large markers ? No idea (any radar experts ?), but not his fault, and not ours.

Thank goodness no-one was hurt.

AlanF
1st January 2008, 17:50
Removed by Owner

Test Pilot
3rd January 2008, 13:03
We came across the same vessel 2 months later, but this time the vessels skipper had the boarding hatch open to allow us a more conventional boarding.

My self and a realy good guy, PH, did a lot of the boardings for about two years. We pioneered the methods for boarding the different trawlers.

The hardest were the long liners, as they had steep high sides all round, with only a small hatch on the fwd. st.bd side, where the 'long line' ran out up to two miles long.

Most of the boardings were done at night, and it normally consisted of two boarding guys, rib coxn and boat man. In those days, surprise was everything - get the log book before the skipper could alter it.

We really had a 'slik' operation going here. Identify the vessel, and decide to go for the kill, a final radio transmission - 'Sierra Mike', a tap on the coxn's shoulder, an indication by hand and we were off at full belt. (some times you could not talk to the crew as the wind conditions would drown out all communication).

The coxn would position himself so that he could go at fastest speed possible, at an angle of 45 deg. towards the hatch. The two boarding guys would move to the bow and hang on to each other and the rib, with the boat man behind us, as we closed the vessel. The rib would strike the vessel at full speed, the front of the rib would 'crumlpe' to absorb the shock, the momentum would carry us in through the hatch and on to the work deck. The rib meanwhile would bounce away at another 45 deg, without damage.

From there on it was fastest way possible to the bridge. The work deck crews never gave us any bother as they were usually totally surprised and stunned. On occasion a skipper might run round to lock doors and windows to prevent access to the wheelhouse. One skipper, once tore the page from his 'rough log' and tried to eat it. This was recovered and used in evidence against him!

On another occasion the watch keeper grabbed the log and ran down to the skippers cabin to have it altered. We kicked in the door (as they would not open it) and found the skipper in a naked state just out of the bunk trying to alter the log. He too was arrested.

While all this was going on the ship would be a few miles away so as not to give our position away to the fishing vessels. And as I said before, some of our skippers never saw what went on, on board these ships.

I must say, we never experienced bad feeling towards us having made an arrest. We could spend up to two days on board the arrested vessel while taking her to port, but once the shock of the arrest had passed, the crews were usually very good to us. That goes for Spanish, french and Irish.

Great days!:smile: :smile: :smile:

Attached: boarding party on Spanish trawler, from those days.

concussion
3rd January 2008, 13:16
The rib would strike the vessel at full speed, the front of the rib would 'crumlpe' to absorb the shock, the momentum would carry us in through the hatch and on to the work deck.

If I saw that in a film I'd never believe people would actually do that....fair dues!! :biggrin:

Test Pilot
3rd January 2008, 13:23
If I saw that in a film I'd never believe people would actually do that....fair dues!! :biggrin:

Thanks:biggrin:

clean it again
3rd January 2008, 14:10
please do not get a job with a ferry compnay, i hate to see you putting the ferry into hollyhead, using those methods

Goldie fish
3rd January 2008, 18:49
It would get the cars unloaded much faster...

AlanF
3rd January 2008, 20:53
Removed by Owner

hptmurphy
3rd January 2008, 22:24
Rememeber wrappg the towel around my neck to stop the water comming into the suit..robbing cling film from
a galley to wrap my fags in while waiting for the boarding party to return to have a smoke..bear in mind there were 10 gallons of petrol behind the seat.....

I never even got my life jacket dirty

red floating hell hensen suits that were handed down from the ward room and usually smelt to high heaven and weighed about twenty pounds due to soakake....foot wear consisted of runners or shoes so you could get them off fast in the case of hitting the water...all topped of by a monkey hat...ah!! the good old days of health and safety..

Test Pilot
3rd January 2008, 22:50
TP, looking at the boarding gear these guy's have on I expect that this was in the 90's.

In the summer it was not to bad I would wear my leather biker jacket :biggrin:

AlanF

Well I dont remember the bike jacket, but I do have a clear picture of you and the trade mark hat over the years.:smile:

The boarding suits were standard issue then (thank God), but as Murph says, I also remember the towel around the neck when wearing the Helly Hanson's to stop the water running down your back. Ouch!

One thing the dry suits were great for, was for holding 'Gifts'. i.e. The odd few bottles of Spanish or French wine. One could open the zip behind the life jacket and place the bottles around your mid section, with the waist strap of the life jacket pulled tight to prevent the bottles falling down around your ankles.:smile:
Sometimes there would be an odd ' clink' as one would be climbing back on deck! Other times after a long time spent on a Spanish vessel, it would be noted that the returning boarding party would have difficulty walking in a straight line!:smile:

And I do recall in 1981 where a boarding nco, dressed in 'Blue foulies' and Gustaf machine gun could hardly stand up when he handed over the arrested Spanish vessel to the Gardai in Galway docks. :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin:

YankeeHotelFoxtrot
4th January 2008, 14:03
[QUOTE=Test Pilot;190892

One thing the dry suits were great for, was for holding 'Gifts'. i.e. The odd few bottles of Spanish or French wine. [/QUOTE]

Don Simon...never seen anywhere else only at sea!