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Boomer
16th February 2009, 19:01
Based on an idea on the USN Website.
I would like to be able to update this once a week, if you have any information about whether any of the NS Ships are at sea or docked then please PM or email me the information.

Naval Service Personnel
Active Duty

Officers -
Other Ranks -

Reserve

Officers -
Other Ranks -


Naval Service Ships Status

LE Eithne - Deepwarter Berth Cobh
LE Roisin - ?
LE Niamh - ?
LE Emer - ?
LE Aoife - At Sea
LE Aisling - ?
LE Orla - ?
LE Ciara - ?

Arrests since 1st Jan 2009 - ?

YankeeHotelFoxtrot
16th February 2009, 20:33
I wouldn't be too inclined to be putting ship's operational status or details on a public website. Even if it is now a breach of security, which it may be, I wouldn't feel too comfortable about it anyway.

blaisec
16th February 2009, 20:38
Its a matter of mathematics really just stand on the high road in Cobh and look across the harbour and count 1. 2. 3.........

pmtts
16th February 2009, 20:41
I wouldn't be too inclined to be putting ship's operational status or details on a public website. Even if it is now a breach of security, which it may be, I wouldn't feel too comfortable about it anyway.

Im not sure listing vessels that are in dock could be classed as a possible security breach.

I can access next day RN vessel movements out of Portsmouth on a public website.

YankeeHotelFoxtrot
16th February 2009, 20:42
Im not sure listing vessels that are in dock could be classed as a possible security breach.

I can access next day RN vessel movements out of Portsmouth on a public website.

OK fair enough, I just thought I might raise the question. No odds to me anyway as I see the bastard things every day.:tongue:

Goldie fish
16th February 2009, 20:44
Im not sure listing vessels that are in dock could be classed as a possible security breach.

I can access next day RN vessel movements out of Portsmouth on a public website.

But you will rarely get all the RN in Portsmouth :rolleyes:

paul g
16th February 2009, 21:04
Then again the naval service could be assembling forces in preparation for a drug interdiction mission. I tend to agree with Yankee Hotel Foxtrot

MURPH
16th February 2009, 21:27
Then again the naval service could be assembling forces in preparation for a drug interdiction mission. I tend to agree with Yankee Hotel Foxtrot

+1

hptmurphy
16th February 2009, 21:50
Then again the naval service could be assembling forces in preparation for a drug interdiction mission. I tend to agree with Yankee Hotel Foxtrot

historically if you see a gaggle of NS ships in the one area somebody is about to have a bad day

you might notice how even RTE tend not to film the area when theres a gathering ...

iw ould tend to agre that its not good parctise to advertise where all the ships might even be.

Goldie fish
16th February 2009, 21:57
How are the invasion plans going anyway?

Them Icelandics will pay!

clean it again
17th February 2009, 10:07
get all the ships together for a drug operation.
is there enough ropes to tied them up or are they in the Q stores
and cannot be handed out, as they are for the LEB

opsec, go to any navy bar and listen to the talk and the bar, buy a couple of pints
and you will get the low down.

:redface:

Goldie fish
17th February 2009, 10:08
Wha?

YankeeHotelFoxtrot
17th February 2009, 20:19
opsec, go to any navy bar and listen to the talk and the bar, buy a couple of pints
and you will get the low down.

:redface:

So how are things in Casablanca? Missing Humphrey Bogart there?

golden rivet
17th February 2009, 22:53
get all the ships together for a drug operation.
is there enough ropes to tied them up or are they in the Q stores
and cannot be handed out, as they are for the LEB

opsec, go to any navy bar and listen to the talk and the bar, buy a couple of pints
and you will get the low down.

:redface::confused:what are you smoking... ropes... q stores.. for the leb.. where is that.. navy bars... me no comprende.. :confused:

ocean
18th February 2009, 00:15
get all the ships together for a drug operation.
is there enough ropes to tied them up or are they in the Q stores
and cannot be handed out, as they are for the LEB

opsec, go to any navy bar and listen to the talk and the bar, buy a couple of pints
and you will get the low down.

:redface:

Reminds me of

i have done Seal / BUDs
SAS / SBS

and a 2 weeks FAS course in Office skills in ballyer, so there I am qual to talk about it

Got it!

niallheff
20th February 2009, 22:40
Very good idea for a thread! :D

Aisling is currently down at that oil spill so she is at sea anyway!

Nav Trooper
9th June 2010, 23:32
The current state is for Naval Ops and anyone else inquiring is probably up to no good.

pmtts
10th June 2010, 00:45
The current state is for Naval Ops and anyone else inquiring is probably up to no good.

Take your tin foil hat off!

Many worldwide navies publish an up to date status of what they are up to.

Goldie fish
9th July 2010, 18:09
316. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Defence if he has satisfied himself that adequate resources are available to the Air Corps and Naval Services to ensure adequate coastal surveillance; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [30758/10]

Minister for Defence (Deputy Tony Killeen): I propose to take Questions Nos. 307 and 316 together.

Responsibility for the prevention of drug trafficking lies primarily with the Customs Service of the Revenue Commissioners, while responsibility for the prevention of crime lies primarily with An Garda Síochána. However, the White Paper on Defence provides for a security role for the Naval Service and the Air Corps to assist and support the civil authorities in this important work.

The Naval Service provides the maritime element of the Defence Forces and has a general responsibility to meet contingent and actual maritime defence requirements. The Naval Service operates eight general purpose patrol ships. All eight ships are involved in coastal and offshore patrolling and surveillance for the State in that part of the seas where the State’s jurisdiction applies. The Naval Service intends to further enhance its surveillance capabilities by utilising both Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) and Long Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT) which identifies merchant shipping approaching and in Irish waters.

The primary day-to-day tasking of the Naval Service is to provide a fishery protection service in accordance with the State’s obligations as a member of the European Union. However, as the need arises, Naval Service vessels are deployed to other duties such as aid to the civil power, search and rescue or recovery and drug interdiction operations.

The current Exclusive Fishery Limits extend to 200 miles offshore and cover an area of 132,000 nautical square miles. The Naval Service currently patrols the entire 200 mile limit and periodically patrols beyond these limits to protect specific fisheries. These patrols are carried out on a regular and frequent basis and are directed to all areas of Irish waters as necessary. The number of Patrol Vessels on patrol in Irish waters at any one time varies between three and eight. The Naval Service is committed to having at least three vessels on patrol within the Irish Exclusive Economic Zone at any one time. All vessels are multi-tasked in the sense that they also undertake general surveillance, security and other duties while on patrol.

Naval Service patrols are complemented by assistance provided by the Air Corps. The Air Corps Maritime Squadron carries out aerial surveillance of our Exclusive Economic Zone using the two CASA maritime patrol aircraft. Government measures to improve law enforcement in relation to drugs, including the establishment in 1993 of a Joint Task Force involving An Garda Síochána, the Customs Service and the Naval Service, have helped to maximise the effective use of Naval Service resources in combating drug trafficking. The Air Corps provide air support and, on occasion, carry the Customs National Drugs Team in an observational capacity for the purpose of monitoring vessels suspected of drug trafficking and other illegal activities. There is close co-operation between the civil authorities and the Naval Service and the Air Corps in discharging this important mission.

An Inter-Departmental Maritime Surveillance Co-ordination Group (MarSur CG), chaired by the Department of Transport, has been established under the auspices of the Maritime Co-ordination Group of Assistant Secretaries. The Co-ordination Group will work towards the creation of a common information-sharing environment to enhance safety and security within the Irish maritime domain. The Department of Defence and the Naval Service are represented on this Group along with other Government Departments and Agencies responsible for safety and security in the maritime environment.

Internationally, the establishment in 2007 of the Maritime Analysis and Operations Centre – Narcotics (MAOC-N) has led to a greater focus on intelligence exchange amongst countries to tackle large drug shipments by sea. MAOC-N was set up by seven European countries and is designed as an international co-ordination force with access to national tasking agencies and requires participation and resources from all active members. An Garda Síochána and the Customs Service have full-time officers based at the Centre in Lisbon. Irish Naval Service personnel travel to the Centre when requested by the Joint Task Force.

I am satisfied that with these initiatives in place, the Naval Service and the Air Corps can continue to effectively support the civil authorities in combating drug trafficking and other criminal activity.