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View Full Version : Land Rovers in Liberia (Any hard info or pics )



Gunner
8th January 2004, 11:28
is there any further info on the land Rover 110 wmk ( weapon mount kit ) featured in the press used by ARW before christmas
hope fully not leased items and on Irish reg plates

rgds

cav gunner

Infy
8th January 2004, 13:36
Here (http://www.military.ie/whatsnew/liberia.html)

Adrian
8th January 2004, 13:41
Photo of one in the thread re: Liberian rebels... dosen't look like having an irish reg...

John
8th January 2004, 14:21
Originally posted by Adrian
Photo of one in the thread re: Liberian rebels... dosen't look like having an irish reg...

That's a UN plate

Adrian
8th January 2004, 14:29
So I gather it is an DF vehicle, it needs a UN plate?

John
8th January 2004, 14:40
Originally posted by Adrian
So I gather it is an DF vehicle, it needs a UN plate?

I take it that the plate is associated with the mission; it begins UNMIL and is followed by a numeric group.

Frank Aiken
9th January 2004, 10:25
[MOD: This post was in response to a post by Victor in another thread.It was moved here as the discussion which followed related to this thread.The question re British Landrovers is therefore out of context through no fault of Frank Aiken.]


Don't think they are british landrovers? The brits have full military spec landrovers, the ones in Liberia are a standard land rover with a few extra gun mounts etc.

B Inman
10th January 2004, 00:14
All nationally registered vehicles are fitted with UN plates when they arrive in the mission area. The letters on the plate are the name of the mission,

eg in Lebannon the reg plates were UNIFIL 123 etc
on the Golan heights the reg plates were UNDOF 123 etc

It does not matter if vehicles are supplied by troop contributing country or by the UN, all are fitted with UN reg plates. When 43 Irishbatt deployed to Lebannon in 1978 all its vehicles were fitted with UN reg plates.

Goldie fish
10th January 2004, 00:52
Originally posted by Frank Aiken
Don't think they are british landrovers? The brits have full military spec landrovers, teh ones in liberia are a standard land rover with a few extra gun mounts etc.

Not true. The vehicles in use in Liberia,referred to in the Infamous Star article as "battle wagons" and seen on all news reports of ARW operations in that country show them driving the Wolf MRCV on Defender 110 XD chassis
http://www.expeditionexchange.com/action7/3para_wmik_hr_.jpg (http://www.expeditionexchange.com/action7/3para_wmik_hr.jpg)
British Army Wolf MRCV

http://www.military.ie/images/Liberia%20Dec%2003/Liberia025-Dec-03.jpg
ARW "rapid response vehicle."

Spot the difference?

ias
10th January 2004, 12:31
GF, I think you may be wrong, if you look closely at the BA example you will see 2 storage boxes/access panels behind the "door" and on the front wing immediately ahead of the door. Also, the BA tends not to leave the "Defender" badge on the front.

IAS

The Thing
10th January 2004, 13:14
There are reports coming back from Liberia that the Landrover that crashed recently and killing a Ranger was not a true Mil spec Landrover like the wolfs! Seemly the .5 mounted made the rover unstable when moving it in transit causing it to crash. How true this is I don't know but im sure to mount a heavy weapon on an open top platform then the whole springs would have to be upgraded! I would like to see the army buying these for every reece platoon and not using the totally unsuitable Nissan Patrol.

John
10th January 2004, 17:50
Originally posted by The Thing
There are reports coming back from Liberia that the Landrover that crashed recently and killing a Ranger was not a true Mil spec Landrover like the wolfs! Seemly the .5 mounted made the rover unstable when moving it in transit causing it to crash. How true this is I don't know but im sure to mount a heavy weapon on an open top platform then the whole springs would have to be upgraded! I would like to see the army buying these for every reece platoon and not using the totally unsuitable Nissan Patrol.

Top heaviness comes as standard with this type of vehicle.

rod and serpent
26th January 2004, 13:21
This is what the British Special forces are working with now that they have replaced the old "pink panther".

dangermouse
5th February 2004, 09:51
Nice close up pic of the 50cal mounted on the landrover on the front of this months An Cosantoir

faughanballagh
14th February 2004, 04:38
Well looking at the pics, I love the one with the caption, "Liberian youths showing off their array of assualt rifles and rocket propelled gun [should read "grenades"]."

hptmurphy
24th February 2004, 23:00
Gunner ....I'll bet that you are sorry you asked.........!

Goldie fish
22nd August 2005, 07:04
An interesting article in yesterdays Ireland On Sunday by Ken Foxe about the recent sale of the Land Rover involved in the Fatal crash in Liberia. It mentioned that of five that were in service,the remainder are now stripped down and were distributed to the other brigades for use in funerals.

I am hoping that somebody could post the article?

kefu
23rd August 2005, 12:33
21/09/05
A DEFENCE Forces jeep in which an elite Irish Army Ranger died was stripped down and sold off for €1,200 at a public auction, Ireland on Sunday has learned.
Former colleagues of Sgt Derek Mooney branded the move "grossly insensitive" but the Department of Defence has a policy of selling all unused vehicles, regardless of why they ended up out of service.
Six of the €50,000 Landrover 110 jeeps were sent to Liberia along with a forty-strong reconaissance force of Rangers two years ago.
Less than a week into their tour of duty, the open-topped vehicle that Sgt Mooney, 33, was travelling in went out of control on a badly-rutted road about 40 kilometres from the capital Monrovia in November of 2003. Two other Rangers were also injured, one seriously, in the crash.
Ireland on Sunday has learnt that none of the six jeeps involved ever returned to operational service after the Liberia mission. The five remaining vehicles were instead dispersed around the country for use in "funeral duties".
Sgt Mooney's vehicle was stripped down of any military fittings and parts and sold at auction along with other obsolete equipment.
Spokesman Captain Sean O'Fatharta said: 'All vehicles that we don't use are sold through the Department of Defence - that has been the policy for many years.
'This vehicle was stripped down to the chassis and then auctioned. Of the six vehicles bought, five of them remain in service and they were distributed to the different brigades for use in funeral services.
'It was always intended that they would be upgraded after the Liberia mission. Another reconnaisance vehicle, the Ford 350, was instead purchased for use by the Army Ranger Wing.'
The Defence Forces said there were no safety issues with the Landrover 110 involved in the fatal crash and that all soldiers had been given full training, including the use of left-hand drive vehicles.
The spokesman said: 'In most United Nations missions, the vehicles have been left-hand drive and all those who travelled to Liberia received training in their use.'
Some colleagues of Sgt Mooney believe the remnants of the vehicle should never have been sold. One friend: 'It should either have been stored or destroyed. The idea of selling it off at auction is grossly insensitive.
'While everybody recognises that the poor state of the roads in West Africa was a factor in this crash, there was a widespread belief that this vehicle was never suitable for use in this type of mission. With an open-top jeep, injuries to passengers are always much worse when an accident does occur.'
Military analyst Declan Power, who visited Irish troops in Liberia last Summer, said: 'I'm sure some may think it's somewhat insensitive that the vehicle in which Sgt Mooney met his death has been sold on but what people must remember is that the Defence Force's first requirement is to function in a manner in which it can meet its operational needs fully and effectively.
'Thankfully, Irish service men have incurred relatively light fatality levels during their overseas deployment. To put this into perspective, would it be such an issue if the US military or indeed the British Armed Forces disposed of vehicles in which their personnel were killed.
'I'm sure most operational soldiers, be they Irish, British, or American would be more concerned that they deploy with the right types of vehicle and weaponry in order to defend themselves and complete their mission, rather than with what happens that vehicle if they're unfortunate enough to be injured while using it.'
He said road traffic accidents were among the greatest dangers facing the troops in West Africa: 'Certainly during my time in Liberia, it was obvious that the roads - in as much as they can be called that - provided one of the greatest threats to Irish and other UN personnel in the region.'
Sgt Mooney was one of the most respected members of the Ranger Wing, Ireland's equivalent of the SAS.
The Rangers are equipped with a wide variety of weapons, including HK33 and HK53 automatic rifles, MP5 sub-machine guns, Sig P226 pistols and the AI96 .308 Accuracy International sniper rifle.
Each year, around forty serving soldiers put themselves forward for selection to the specialised unit. An intensive four-week programme whittles that down to just three or four. The Rangers are also trained to deal with anti-terrorist urban conflict situations, parachuting, combat diving, small boat handling and mountaineering.