PDA

View Full Version : L.E Eithne visit to Argentina



McCarthy
13th January 2006, 20:12
I just saw on the 6 o clock news that Eithne is set to depart for Argentina.
This is another big milestone for the ever evolving Navy.
I know a few guys onboard so best of luck to them and all the crew.

Goldie fish
13th January 2006, 20:26
Admiralante Brown, the founder of the argie Navy was an irishman, I think.

McCarthy
13th January 2006, 20:32
Thats why they're going over, The Argentinian Navy is 150 years in existance this year.
In 2004 a group of Argentinian delegates visited Foxford (the birthplace of Brown).
http://www.irishseamensrelativesassociation.org/Irish%20Argentinian%20Navies%20Foxford%203rd%20Mar ch%202004.htm

Goldie fish
14th January 2006, 01:11
http://dynamic.rte.ie/av/2106291.smil

McCarthy
14th January 2006, 01:17
She's one robot in fairness to her.

GoneToTheCanner
14th January 2006, 01:47
Hi there
What value is to be gained from this trip? Is it just a waste of budget? What possible experience will the crew get, that they could not get in home waters? How does it affect the existing patrol/leave rosters for the stay-at-homes? Will they pay a courtesy call to the RN at Port Stanley? Be a shame not to after going all that way?
regards
GttC

Goldie fish
14th January 2006, 05:36
You find that these trips, like the Hong Kong visit of Niamh some years ago, are used by irish industry, and the Irish enterprise board to promote irish business abroad. I wouldnt be surprised if there was a resupply/stopover in Liberia along the way too.

GoneToTheCanner
14th January 2006, 11:02
Hi Goldie
A bit of peaceful gunboat diplomacy? I hope the wear and tear of a 20000 mile trip don't lead to it's premature retirement.
regards
GttC

eelmonster
14th January 2006, 14:14
She's one robot in fairness to her.

... but you'd still give her a good smack on the arse.

Every year you/I tend to see a group of foreign naval personnel milling around the top of Grafton Street. They wear short tunics/jackets and carry ceremonial daggers/scabbards - are these Argies?

Goldie fish
14th January 2006, 20:52
Naval uniforms..short tunics...that narrows it down....NOT.

Slacker
14th January 2006, 22:03
GttC,

If a foreign nation feels it needs to honour an Irishman as a national hero, I'd be well pleased.

DeV
14th January 2006, 22:49
Hi there
What value is to be gained from this trip? Is it just a waste of budget? What possible experience will the crew get, that they could not get in home waters? How does it affect the existing patrol/leave rosters for the stay-at-homes?
regards
GttC

Its all training - I assume a number of cadets / officers under training will be involved (as was the case with the Asia trip).

During the last major Browne celebrations (1950s/60s) the Argies offered to train a number of Irish cadets.

I also assume that like the Asia trip there will be a large number of people looking to go on this trip.

eelmonster
15th January 2006, 00:02
Goldie, how many naval officers/senior ncos carry scabbards when walking out? I must admit I have confused myself, because in the exact same spot i have seen the argie rugby team milling about.

Goldie fish
15th January 2006, 06:54
Goldie, how many naval officers/senior ncos carry scabbards when walking out? I must admit I have confused myself, because in the exact same spot i have seen the argie rugby team milling about.

What makes you think they are argentinian? Many Navies visit irish ports regularly every year. They all have their own Uniform regulations and I am not an expert on any of them. Perhaps there was some sort of ceremony nearby that required them to wear swords(government buildings are not far from grafton St, could have been making their way back to the quays)?

I may be mistaken, but I understand a number of Irish cadets got the opportunity to take part in the Tall Ships race aboard an Argentinian Sail Training vessel a number of years ago(maybe last year).

eelmonster
15th January 2006, 20:18
What makes you think they are argentinian?

They were sallow-skinned and spoke Spanish ... could have been Spanish, or from any Spanish-speaking Latin American country. Perhaps I had already linked the Argentine sailing vessel to the lads with the daggers, but the connection has since been severed. They all looked like officer cadets.

Lordinajamjar
16th January 2006, 04:50
They were sallow-skinned and spoke Spanish ... could have been Spanish, or from any Spanish-speaking Latin American country. Perhaps I had already linked the Argentine sailing vessel to the lads with the daggers, but the connection has since been severed. They all looked like officer cadets.

Could be Chilean too. Has the Chilean navy made any courtesy visits lately?

The Chilean navy was also founded by an Irishman, Bernardo O'Higgins. So who knows maybe the Eithne will round Cape Horn and call in on Chile while she's at it.

Goldie fish
16th January 2006, 10:32
Could be Chilean too. Has the Chilean navy made any courtesy visits lately?

The Chilean navy was also founded by an Irishman, Bernardo O'Higgins. So who knows maybe the Eithne will round Cape Horn and call in on Chile while she's at it.

Which reminds me..
http://www.irishmilitaryonline.com/board/showthread.php?t=6533

ODIN
16th January 2006, 12:34
When is Eithne expected to reach Argentina?!?

McCarthy
16th January 2006, 18:54
They're leaving next month and its supposed to take two weeks

Aidan1972
16th January 2006, 23:17
Will LE Eithne's outward vovage involve a re-supply stopover in Liberia and possible courtesy calls on Brazil and Uruguay? And will the homeward vovage take her into the Pacific to return to Ireland via the Panama Canal, stopping off at Chile, Peru and Ecuador? Whatever route is chosen, this particular overseas visit should prove to be a landmark event for the Naval Service. Hopefully, Ireland's government will make further use of its naval assets in this manner, e.g. with possible trade promotion visits to the Arabian Gulf and India.

McCarthy
16th January 2006, 23:41
They will definitley have to stopover but its not yet definite where.
Maybe they'll even stop a few times.
When Niamh went to Asia she stopped half a dozen times.
To go from here to brazil is a hell of a distance so I wouldnt rule out Spain as a stopover.

EDIT heres a pic of Niamh on a stopover in Tenerife en-route to Asia in '03

DeV
17th January 2006, 19:19
http://www.military.ie/pr/2006/16-01-06.htm

Press Release
Date: Monday 16th Jan 2006

Naval Deployment to South America
The Minister for Defence Mr Willie O'Dea T.D. and the Flag Officer Commanding Naval Service, Commodore Frank Lynch will attend a Press Reception on Wednesday 18th January 2006, to announce the forthcoming deployment of Ireland's Flagship L.E. Eithne to South America. The deployment is a result of the Governments acceptance of an invitation from the Argentine Government to send a Naval Ship to Argentina. The reception will take place at 1200p.m. on board L.E. Eithne at Sir John Rogersons Quay, Dublin.

The LE Eithne will depart the Naval base on 6th February and is expected to return on 8th April 2006. During that time the ships crew, under the command of Commander Mark Mellet will:

-Fulfil the diplomatic and military obligations associated with such a high level invitation and at the same time support Irish economic and other National Interests in the countries being visited.

-Support the work of a variety of NGOs & Missionaries working along the South Atlantic American rim. Electricians, carpenters and engineers of the ships crew will provide assistance in some of the missions and NGO groups visited.

-Build on the ships official twinning arrangement will Our Lady's Children's Hospital Crumlin by using the ship as a focal point for health service provider recruitment & support for sick children. In an initiative organised by Dr Diarmuid Martin DD, Archbishop of Dublin, toys given into parishes in the Dublin diocese will be distributed to sick children in the various ports visited. The ship will also be visited by sick children and the ships crew will visit children in hospitals, just as they do in Ireland.

-Attend celebrations to commemorate Admiral William Brown, the Mayo man who founded the Argentine Navy.

In addition to Buenos Aries and Mar del Plata in Argentina the ship will also visit Montevideo in Uruguay, Rio de Janeiro and Fortalessa in Brazil.

Coinciding with the press reception will be a fun day for sick children attending Our Lady's Hospital. The reception will be attended by representatives of Our Lady's Hospital and the Dublin Archdiocese.

Defence Minister Willie O'Dea stated that he was delighted to approve the deployment to Argentina by the LE Eithne. "Ireland has an extensive range of links with Argentina, including of course the Admiral Browne connection and this visit by an Irish Naval vessel will strengthen and refresh these valuable links. I have no doubt that the Navy will act as excellent ambassadors for Ireland during their deployment".

The Reception will provide excellent photographic opportunities. Members of the media are invited to attend. Those wishing to attend should meet Defence Forces Press Office personnel as follows:

Day/Date : Wednesday 18th January 2006

Time : 11.45 am.

Location : LE Eithne, Sir John Rogersons Quay, Dublin.

For further information; please contact:

Press Officer: Comdt. Brian Cleary : 01-8042687: 01-6771434: 087-2482130

Assistant PO: Capt. Sean O'Fatharta: 01-8042686: 087-6738395

Big Al
17th January 2006, 19:29
I'd hate to be the poor sod who gets watch (or what ever they call it) the night they are in Rio :biggrin:

ODIN
19th January 2006, 13:54
There was a report on this last night on TV3 news

Gasplug
19th January 2006, 16:27
Will they be bringing any vehicles on the ship? or will they borrrow cars or something over there?

Goldie fish
19th January 2006, 19:54
They will.

4 Rigid Inflatable Boats.

I see RTE couldn't be bothered their ass again!

ODIN
20th January 2006, 12:16
But what is new goldie?!?

GoneToTheCanner
26th January 2006, 01:23
Hi all
How are people picked to go on such trips? Is it done on a usual-crew basis or do you get the dockyard wasters trying to get on for the duration?
regards
GttC

Sluggie
26th January 2006, 01:55
Gttc

The usual ships crew will go. There will be an attempt by the base rats to get a berth but these days they are usually very good at repeling boarders. The NSR is usually offered a few berths on each foreign trip as recognition of their assistance during the year. This somtimes would be a request for a particular individual who was seen as a good worker/team player.

mikeym
28th January 2006, 22:02
Best of luck to the le eithne crew, i would love to be going on it.

Sailor Girl
5th February 2006, 23:18
They will definitley have to stopover but its not yet definite where.
Maybe they'll even stop a few times.
When Niamh went to Asia she stopped half a dozen times.
To go from here to brazil is a hell of a distance so I wouldnt rule out Spain as a stopover.

EDIT heres a pic of Niamh on a stopover in Tenerife en-route to Asia in '03


It is actually LE Niamh on a fuel stop in Tenerife while enroute to Liberia in Oct 2003. LE Niamh visited Asia in 2002 and went through the Suez Canal NOT via South Africa ! :mad:
________
Herbal Vaporizer Reviews (http://vaporizer.org/)

McCarthy
5th February 2006, 23:23
Sorry about that

McCarthy
6th February 2006, 19:38
Eithne left this morning at 1130

Sluggie
6th February 2006, 22:39
http://dynamic.rte.ie/av/228-2113131.smil

Its the third story in this 76 second clip. How generous of RTE.

McCarthy
6th February 2006, 22:47
You'd think RTE would make an effort for this

Goldie fish
7th February 2006, 00:54
They never have before, why start now?

They(RTE) only want to report bad news about the DF

the babs
7th February 2006, 02:32
at least they made some sort of effort, TV3 didnt even bother even saying anything about Eithne.

p.s. i'm not standing up for RTE

ODIN
7th February 2006, 11:06
TV3 did a report on the day before the trip began. there may be something today

womble
7th February 2006, 14:27
I think that RTE's coverage of the DF's reflects the demand for such coverage in the country, i.e. the average person takes little notice or interst in our DF's unfortunately. And of course a negative story is a better sound bite that a positive one and most people like to hear bad news to some extent, aslong as it doesn't effect them.

Good look to the crew, safe trip I'm proud that they will represent us abroad as excellently as they do at home.

McCarthy
7th February 2006, 18:14
There is an article on military.ie of the trip.
Theres also a map showing the route the ships going to take.


http://www.military.ie/naval/archive/eithne_diary/dep.htm

http://www.military.ie/naval/archive/eithne_diary/largemap.jpg

Brian McGrath
7th February 2006, 18:41
I have to agree with the comments about the coverage by the Media of the Eithnes departure, it was disgraceful to think that a trip like this would get so little coverage, I dont know if this is the same link you have of Tom McSweeneys report but its all I could find, check it out.

http://www.rte.ie/news/2006/0206/6news.html

Regards
Brian

hptmurphy
7th February 2006, 21:53
Why was it so disgraceful?

It wasn't as if we were going to invade the place.....or repel boarders from some forgotten out post of the empire. It just wasn't news worthy enough.

How many rotations overseas on peace keeping duties have gone unreported?

How many other foreign trips by the NS have gone unreported.?..obviously RTE etc were more interested in Danish cartoonists!

moggy
8th February 2006, 10:25
Why was it so disgraceful?

It wasn't as if we were going to invade the place.....or repel boarders from some forgotten out post of the empire. It just wasn't news worthy enough.

How many rotations overseas on peace keeping duties have gone unreported?

How many other foreign trips by the NS have gone unreported.?..obviously RTE etc were more interested in Danish cartoonists!


it's very sad but the people of our nation wanted to see and hear about bishop
casey coming thru dublin docks the eithne leaving the base

McCarthy
9th February 2006, 00:01
On military.ie the crew give a daily report on whats going on onboard.
It also gives their midday position-its worth a look

Goldie fish
9th February 2006, 00:06
see your earlier post in this thread...

moggy
11th February 2006, 15:44
see your earlier post in this thread...


I would like for all of you to be aware the the Naval Association donated a substantial
amount of us dollars to Cdr Mellitt before she departed - money was collected from branches in Cork,Limerick,Waterford and Dublin.

The money will be used for various projects on her route, - various projects that the crew will be involved in ie helping the poor etc.

McCarthy
12th February 2006, 18:27
Fair play

Goldie fish
13th February 2006, 09:50
26 Feb 06 LE Eithne P 31 Mar de la Plata
01 Mar 06 LE Eithne P 31 Buenos Aires
09 Mar 06 LE Eithne P 31 Montevideo
16 Mar 06 LE Eithne P 31 Rio de Janeiro
25 Mar 06 LE Eithne P 31 Fortaleza, Brazil

Goldie fish
18th February 2006, 13:57
Eithne Crossed the Equator on Thursday, Becoming the First Irish Naval vessel to enter the south Atlantic, and the second to cross the equator(Though many dispute Niamhs crossing, as she altered her course to cross, and returned north shortly after.)


The good news is that there is a team aboard filming a documentary of the trip. When, or where it will be shown is not known.

Keep up with the ships movement at here (http://www.military.ie/naval/archive/eithne_diary/diary.htm)

You can email the crew with messages of goodwill here (captain@eithne.amosconnect.com)

Fianóglach
18th February 2006, 22:13
Argentine Naval Cadets visited the Military College Curragh Camp in 1947. The following photograph was sent to me by a daughter of one of the Cadets in the picture.

http://www.curragh.info/images/gallery/argentine.jpg

The photograph was taken outside the present Defence Forces Library D.F.T.C.

Goldie fish
19th February 2006, 00:35
It is with great pride that I can give you the Latest instalments of Eithnes Daily Journal, Courtesy of Cdr Mark Mellet.(via Naval HQ)
They have yet to appear on www.military.ie



LE EITHNE
DAILY JOURNAL

Captain’s Journal LE EITHNE – Friday 17th of February

The temperature has continued to rise and is now 30 degrees. Over the past thirty-six hours the wind has shifted from the fresh North Easterly we had North of the Equator to a more modest but freshening South Easterly wind south of the equator. These are the trade winds separated by the dreaded doldrums and so valued by sail ships over the centuries. Overnight new constellations that most of us have never seen were visible in the heavens. Just over the horizon the Arquipelago de Fernando de Noronha rises out of the ocean. The main island of the group appears completely mountainous and is covered in vegetation. The islands owned by Brazil have a restricted area surrounding them preventing fishing, hunting and any other action which might affect the environment. In previous times the islands were home to a notorious prison for Brazil’s most hardened criminals. We continue to get some assistance from the south equatorial current, which pushes west. Soon we will be smack in the middle of the Brazilian current, which will assist in bringing us exactly where we want to go along the coast to the river plate.

I left you yesterday as the pipe “Captain report to the F’ocsle” was made by the leading hand of the watch Courtney Gibbons. F’ocsle is an abbreviation for “forecastle” and comes from the time of sail when ships were built with a forecastle to the front of the ship, a main deck in the middle and an aft castle at the back of a ship. By the time I got there His Excellency King Neptune (Cook Brendan Fitzgerald), Queen Aphrodite (Petty Officer (PO) Michael Broderick), the court clerk (Warrant Officer (WO) John Walsh), the judge (Senior Chief PO Robbie Byrne), the doctor (PO Hull Artificer Tom Kennedy), the chief of police (Chief PO John (Bull) Hogan) and his Police assistants (PO Paul O’Brien, Cook Alan Corcoran, Seaman Niamh Connoly, Electrician Rory Galvin) were in situ. I requested King Neptune for the right of passage from the Northern to the Southern hemisphere. In reply King Neptune granted the ship and all her crew permission to cross the equator but required that those who had not done so before be required to undergo an appropriate imitation ceremony. On the flight deck the crew were assembled, and under the supervision of Lt Olan (the omen) O’Keefe, “a shellback”, being the only member of the ships company previously to cross the equator, the ceremony began. A representative sample of those who had not crossed the line before, known as “pollywogs” including PO Cook Eddie Staunton, SLt Fergal Tubridy, PO Michael Harrington, Seaman Niall Cremin, Mr Bill Tyson and PO Maurice Plant were assembled. The court was convened and each pollywog was brought before the court and their crimes were read out. As Captain it was my job to appeal for leniency for each, which I succeeded in doing for all but Bill Tyson. Bill is a civilian member of a TV crew who is making a documentary on the deployment and I just could not find any positive qualities that were sufficient to warrant a plea of leniency. All the pollywogs were initiated and required to take the doctors medicine, which consisted of eggs, and flour each was then thrown in the water. Just when I thought all was going smoothly things went bad and I found myself seized by the chief of police and brought before the court. My crimes, were so many, that they were unfolded on a roll of paper, which ran across the flight deck. There was no hope, the crew were silent despite a feeble plea for leniency which was discarded. I had to take my medicine and after being made jump like a monkey and being the only pollywog in uniform I was thrown in the water. So the ceremony which is hundreds of years old and carried out on merchant and naval ships when ever they cross the line was completed in the South Atlantic for the first time on an Irish Naval Ship.

Slowly but surely LE EITHNE’s decks are being transformed as the seamen work their way top down painting as they go. I try to avoid painting unnecessarily. Besides the environmental penalty, there is also the consideration of cost not to mention the time consuming drudgery associated with this task. For once however no body is complaining with perfect weather and the executive officer making sure everyone is properly protected with sunscreen lotion issued to all, the drudgery of the task is more than mitigated by the beautiful weather. It was always our plan to keep this task for the fair weather on passage – good thinking bosun PO Paul McCarthy.

In the logistics department menus for the various functions are being drawn up. We will host, diplomatic receptions, business functions, military functions as well as receiving calls of protocol and custom in each port we visit. The ship will be thronged by thousands of visitors and under the watchful eye of thousands more as they walk or drive by this piece of sovereign Irish territory flying the Irish flag proudly in each country we visit.

LE EITHNE has a huge heart, a great crew – we will make sure she looks the part because when all is said and done she is the best little flagship in the world.

Midday Posn (Z) Irish Time – 04 36S 031 43W
Dist to Cork – 3600 nm (nautical miles)
Dist to Mar De Plata – 2480 nm
Dist to Equator – 276 nm
Temp – a warm 30°C

Goldie fish
19th February 2006, 00:38
LE EITHNE
DAILY JOURNAL

Captain’s Journal LE EITHNE – Saturday18th of February

Progress continues to be good. The weather is again in our favour with an air temperature of 29 degrees and seawater temperature over 30 degrees. The East South East Trade wind has eased and is now moderate or light.

We are now just under a hundred miles off the Brazilian coast. The Brazilian current is a God send and giving us almost an extra knot in speed. Abeam to starboard, which is the right hand side of the ship as you look ahead (Port being the left), is Recife one of Brazil’s major ports. During our initial planning for this deployment this was to be our last Port of call before returning to Ireland but in consultation with HE Excellency Martin Green, Irish Ambassador to Brazil, it was decided to travel further up the Brazilian coast to the Port of Fortaleza. Here because of the work of Irish Missionaries the community have been very much influenced by Irish culture. Further up this coast is the entrance to one of the most spectacular waterways in the world – the Amazon. Enough of that, however, for it will be well over a month before we return to these waters to spend some time. So, lets save the storyline till then.

As I write Ensigns Sean Linehan and James Harding have taken the midday sight, which is a relatively straightforward way of getting your midday latitude. Combining this with a sun run sun they will be able to give me an accurate fix of our position without resorting to electronic navigation aids. Bill Tyson, who is doing the documentary, has been getting lessons from Lt Damian McCormack on Astronomical Navigation using a sextant. Declan the cameraman has just said that it is fortunate Bill has learned so fast or we never might have known that we were in Azerbaijan!

Overnight a number of work parties tackled some critical areas and by morning when the first gym customers (Senior Petty Officer (SPO) Sam Fealy and PO Micheal Broderick turned too on the machines, the hangar deck paint was already dry. Training was a little easier this morning and after getting it in we were ready for our usual breakfast of cereal, fruit juice, brown bread and tea. Most of our gym equipment is fitted with an electronic sensor, which can detect your heartbeat when you wear the appropriate chest strap. The beauty of this is that you can set your programme against your heart. My own preference is to exercise at 158 beats per minute, and the treadmill speeds up and changes elevation as necessary to keep me at that work rate. This is ideal especially if the ship has a list because of the weather. This morning I noticed that when both our Executive officer Lt Cdr Aedh McGinn and myself were exercising our speeds were down. Ultimately however its about work rate not speed and extreme care has to be taken exercising in this heat ensuring for example that sufficient fluids are consumed.

Seabirds are now common and the occasional whale has also been sighted. We normally make returns of all sightings to the Irish Whale and Dolphin group as well as University College Cork’s Coastal Marine Resource Centre, which is co-located with our Base on Haulbowline Island Cork. Monitoring cetaceans and sea life provides data that are of value in assessing environmental health. This is just one of the many services the Navy provides.

Another service we provide is the provision of fire fighting services to vessels in distress. Yesterday we carried out a major fire fighting exercise onboard. From my perspective on a day-to-day basis the greatest threats I face are on one hand the dangers associated with flooding as a consequence of collision, explosion, grounding or intake/valve failure and on the other the danger of fire. Every member of the ship’s company is a fire fighter. Using the state of the art fire fighting training facility at the National Maritime College Ireland, where the navy’s college under Cdr Tom Tuohy is partnered with Cork Institute of Technology under Donal Burke, we are put through our paces. There are no hostages taken in this training. In my last training exercise besides losing my own life I also jeopardised the lives of the fire fighting team I was leading. Embarrassing but that’s the place to do it and not out here when you may have to fight a fire for real. We have nobody to turn to and unless we can put out the fire there really is no plan B. Consider our stores, hundreds of tonnes of diesel, tonnes of high explosives and pyrotechnics as well as all the furnishings, deck stores and supplies all perfect fuels ready to complete the fire triangle. But we shouldn’t be pessimistic, however, we train every few days varying the scenario. Our equipment is good. Some of the facilities we have include fixed CO2 fire installations, numerous pump options to charge the fire main, state of the art breathing apparatus and clothing, thermal imaging cameras (TIC), modern fire alarm facility triggered by heat and or smoke, smoke generators for training and a range of standard hoses, nozzles, branch pipes and foam makers. While posing a huge threat in times of hull damage such as after collision, the sea however can be our saviour when it comes to fire fighting, with its water being pumped throughout the ships fire main to where ever it is required and then being applied as is or in conjunction with a foam making facility to good effect. One of our greatest resources is the level of our training coupled with having one the Navy’s most experienced fire fighting instructors CPO John (Bull) Hogan as our CPO Mechanician.

Our exercise scenario simulated an oil fire in no. 3 generator room. An initial investigation by the ship’s standing sea fire party which includes CPO John Hogan, PO Electrician Fiachra Kelleher, Leading Mech Dwayne (Giggles) McPhilbin and Supply Paddy Lawlor leads to their immediate attempts to bring the fire under control failing. The team closes down the area and leaves one member to brief the attack team while Chief Hogan recommends to the Bridge to proceed immediately to emergency stations. This entails all personnel reporting to pre-assigned stations, all equipped with their personal life- saving equipment. The ship’s damage control headquarters springs to life and under the direction of the ship’s Marine Engineering Officer (MEO) Lt Cdr Anthony Heery the scenario is assessed and our best resources are focussed on the problem. The ships organisation provides for damage control parties at the ship’s forward end under PO Maurice Plant and at the ship’s after end under PO Liam (Sammy) Leahy. Each party has a cross section of skills and technical expertise offering the MEO with a variety of options for tackling the fire. One of the MEO’s first actions is to assign a water boundary cooling team to the adjacent and overhead compartments in order to prevent conduction and likely secondary ignitions. His main weapon in this case ultimately comes down to a four-man attack team making an entry into the compartment where the fire is out of control. The team includes one member with a water-wall offering protection to the team, a fire fighter who fights through the water wall, a hose handler and a team I/C. Each is dressed in a fearnought suit of thick fire resistant woollen material together with anti flash gloves and headgear to protect exposed skin, a helmet, fire fighting gloves and a breathing apparatus which is managed to the second by a controller. The Breathing Apparatus controller, who is a little remote from the fire, monitors cylinder pressures and times calculating when the next attack team needs to relieve the 1st. In our scenario the first team consisting of Seaman Lee Coughlan, Seaman Robbie Wallace, Mech Alan Doyle and Mech Brian Hastings, were relieved by the second team consisting of Seaman Fergal McDonagh, Seaman Robert Buckley, Leading Seaman Gordon Cummins and Seaman Niall Cremin who brought the fire under control eventually extinguishing the blaze. Do we all go to tea then, no, sentries must be mounted and the situation monitored until temperatures have dropped and there is no risk of secondary ignitions. All equipment has to be inspected, recharged and replaced ready for what will hopefully be another training exercise. Of course throughout the whole operation the MEO must also be mindful of the amount of seawater used in bringing the fire under control. There is little point in bringing the fire under control only to present me with my other nightmare of a ship so flooded that we are unable to float.

Onboard, however, we have a number of personnel who in addition to other skills make it their business not to float, our ships diving team. Tomorrow we will pass over the Abrolhos shoal with a least charted depth of 10 metres – lets send the divers down to have a look – more about that tomorrow.

Midday Posn (Z) Irish Time – 10 22S 034 19W
Dist to Cork – 3970 nm (nautical miles)
Dist to Mar De Plata – 2100 nm

Thanks again to Cdr Mark Mellett for allowing me to have the first of the Journal.

And for a spot prize of absolutely nothing, who can tell me what a Shellback is.

McCarthy
19th February 2006, 00:55
Thanks again to Cdr Mark Mellett for allowing me to have the first of the Journal.

And for a spot prize of absolutely nothing, who can tell me what a Shellback is.

A crew member

moggy
19th February 2006, 15:16
A crew member


Goldie thanks for that - I was looking for that yesterday, but I guess the press office
is closed

DeV
19th February 2006, 22:59
During the last major celebration of Admiral Brown in the 1950/1960s (can't remember which) the Argentine Navy offered to train a small group of Irish cadets for nothing but it was turned down.

Goldie fish
19th February 2006, 23:14
Possibly because there was no future for Cadets back then.

Sluggie
19th February 2006, 23:21
A Shellback is a seaman who has crossed the equator and paid his dues to Neptunus rex. A seaman who has not done so is a Pollywog.

For an even lesser prize what is a Golden Shellback?

Goldie fish
19th February 2006, 23:23
Crossed the equator at the international date line?

If I'm not mistaken, the shellback mentioned above did not gain his credentials while in the NS.

Sluggie
20th February 2006, 00:15
Correct on both counts.

Goldie fish
20th February 2006, 00:22
I remember him when he was a civvie. Was in the Asgard support group with him, many moons ago.

Sluggie
20th February 2006, 01:22
Nice Guy.

Goldie fish
20th February 2006, 01:28
Indeed.

As are all naval officers...

Ahem.

Goldie fish
21st February 2006, 20:26
There has been a minor revamp of the diary pages.

week 1 (http://www.military.ie/naval/archive/eithne_diary/diary2.htm)

week 2 (http://www.military.ie/naval/archive/eithne_diary/diary1.htm)

week 3 (http://www.military.ie/naval/archive/eithne_diary/diary3.htm)

http://www.military.ie/naval/archive/eithne_diary/largemap.jpg

McCarthy
22nd February 2006, 14:43
Todays entry by Cdr Mellet is interesting

The Blue Max
22nd February 2006, 17:39
Very interesting read across the board seems the LE EITHNE has been very rewarding both for training and operational reasons so far and I wish them every success with there humanitarian mission and commemerative visit to South America.

X-RayOne
23rd February 2006, 11:17
anybody hear anything on the news today about Eithne nearly running into a partly submerged object on the way to argentina?

i only heard the end of the piece, but it mentions the Eithne firing on the object to destroy it and NS divers being approched by sharks? weird?

just read up the reports of the trip on military.ie. explained about the floating bouy very calmly and clearly.

as usual news report made it sound like the eithne was going to go down quicker than the titanic with all hands eaten by sharks!!

have to say, the posts from the C.O. eithne are very good. fair dues to the NS.

hptmurphy
23rd February 2006, 14:53
Thats not the first time something like that was encountered. SAme thing happened in about 1988..my sources tell me..but was unable to destroy by copious amounts of gunfire...as as Cmdr. Mellet mentions..it was full of polystyerne.

There was a tanker in Bantry which had bumped into it...put a fifty foot hole in the sharp end....missed camera opportunity.

This was the orignal titanic type vesssel and was marked as a nav haz..and was later towed away.

The best of shark storie still goes back to the Aoife in about '85.. I think.....

X-RayOne
23rd February 2006, 15:51
care to tell us the l.e. aoife and shark story? sounds promising!

Smithy
23rd February 2006, 19:47
First shots fired by NS south of the Equator?
________
Sebring (Coupe) (http://www.dodge-wiki.com/wiki/Chrysler_Sebring_(coupe))

Sailor Girl
23rd February 2006, 20:13
I think you mean LE Aisling. 1985 first ship on scene to the Air India disaster. Naval Divers had to recover many bodied and parts, while sharks were circling. Two Divers were awarded DSM's for their part.
________
Roll A Joint (http://howtorollajoint.net/)

Goldie fish
23rd February 2006, 21:18
First shots fired by NS south of the Equator?

Considering Niamh only spent a celebratory few hours south of the line, I think you can confidently say thats the case.


anybody hear anything on the news today about Eithne nearly running into a partly submerged object on the way to argentina?

i only heard the end of the piece, but it mentions the Eithne firing on the object to destroy it and NS divers being approched by sharks? weird?

I understand it was reported in the star. Does anyone have a transcript, or the source of other news stories about this incident so I can forward them to the Ship?

yooklid
23rd February 2006, 22:17
I understand it was reported in the star.

Ireland's brightest daily?!?!?!

Perhaps we'll see more traffic on our other thread then.... :biggrin:

Brian McGrath
23rd February 2006, 22:49
Proud to say that one of the divers on LE Aisling that time that got the DSM was my Brother John, there were quite a few sharks there on the day

Brian

hptmurphy
23rd February 2006, 23:43
Ah I knew John...he was an NCO with training division when I joined up..ask him about his escort duty sometime.

As regarding the sharks with Aoife..it was a hilarious legend from a Leb trip that happened in the Med. Well before your time sailor girl....

I was not trying to underplay the roles of the divers in the air India disaster..as I joined up shortly afterwards and it was still quiet fresh on everybodies minds.

Sailor Girl
24th February 2006, 08:38
Well go on and tell us so. I do know that when swimming stations were piped from time to time on Med trips, there was a sentry posted with an FN/Steyr in case sharks turned up. It was funny because he had to have his flak jacket and helmet on too ! I'm not sure why.... did the sharks have guns too ?:tongue:
________
Bdsm Vids (http://www.****tube.com/categories/8/bdsm/videos/1)

hptmurphy
24th February 2006, 13:02
It was a case of the Shark sentry getting bored....banging off a couple of rounds...and watch his shipmates walk on water and climb straight up the ship sides without aid of Accom ladder or jumping ladder.....only to see this guy rolling around the flag deck in knots of laughing.....and get a good kicking from his mates.....

an oldie and a goldie...this was back in the days when very one was nuts..no health and safety..A7...the bad old days.

I'm sure 'Able' will be able to add a few tales to this one....or how about the stripper...the large pesata coin..and the lighter..hee hee!!!!!

GoneToTheCanner
24th February 2006, 20:08
yeah, I saw that thing on the rag about the NS shooting up a big Orange drum.Jaysus, is Big Ian on the boat? it's probably going to be on lambegs'r'us.com. Maybe the RN will retaliate by blowing up a container of Celtic jerseys.
regards
GttC

Goldie fish
24th February 2006, 21:14
Message from the crew of Eithne:


Many thanks we got a fax of the Star - I thought they were talking about a different story in a different ocean with a different ship!

As reported on the ships daily journal, The Captain spoke on the Gerry Ryan show yesterday.

Click here to listen to the show (http://www.rte.ie/2fm/ryanshow/rams/2006/23feb.smil)

You can forward past the rest of the tripe to 2 hours 15 minutes.

Able
25th February 2006, 05:12
It was a case of the Shark sentry getting bored....banging off a couple of rounds...and watch his shipmates walk on water and climb straight up the ship sides without aid of Accom ladder or jumping ladder.....only to see this guy rolling around the flag deck in knots of laughing.....and get a good kicking from his mates.....

an oldie and a goldie...this was back in the days when very one was nuts..no health and safety..A7...the bad old days.

I'm sure 'Able' will be able to add a few tales to this one....or how about the stripper...the large pesata coin..and the lighter..hee hee!!!!!

My lips are sealed....... What happened at sea... in the Med, in the Leb, in the Base.... Stays at sea, in the Med....... in the Leb..... in the Base.

I'm just here to watch, don't drag me into your stories!:wink:

Goldie fish
25th February 2006, 12:43
26 Feb 06 LE Eithne P 31 Mar de la Plata
01 Mar 06 LE Eithne P 31 Buenos Aires
09 Mar 06 LE Eithne P 31 Montevideo
16 Mar 06 LE Eithne P 31 Rio de Janeiro
25 Mar 06 LE Eithne P 31 Fortaleza, Brazil

Eithne will be escorted up the Rio de la Plata by the Argentinian Corvette ARA Guerrico.

This is the vessel that during the Falklands war, was fired upon my Royal Marines with a Carl Gustav 84mm during the "Battle of Grytviken" in South Georgia, while bombarding their position with its 100mm main armament. By the time the vessel escaped the Royal Marines range, it had taken over 1000 hits from various calibres of weapon, including 84mm, 66mm and 7.62mm.

Its pennant number? P32.

The Ship is known as a Drummond class locally, but was built in France as a D'Estienne D'Orves type, one of two destined for South Africa,but due to UN sanctions to South Africa they were not delivered and were bought by the Argentine Navy in 1978. The third ship of the class was ordered by Argentina and was delivered in 1981.

P-31 ARA Drummond (ex South African Good Hope)
P-32 ARA Guerrico (ex South African Transvaal)
P-33 ARA Granville
http://www.ara.mil.ar/La_Armada/MediosyCapacidades/Flota_de_Mar/Imagenes/Corbeta%20[Drumond]%2001.JPG


Displacement: 1,250 tons full load
Dimensions: 80.5 x 10.3 x 5.2 meters (264 x 34 x 17 feet)
Propulsion: 2 diesels, 2 shafts, 12,000 shp, 24 knots
Crew: 84
Radar: DRBV 51A air/surface search
Sonar: Diodon hull
Fire Control: 1 DRBC 32E
EW: DR 2000-53 intercept, Alligator jammer, 2 Syllex (33: Dagaie) chaff
Armament: 4 MM38 Exocet SSM, 1 100mm DP, 1 dual 40 mm AA, 2 20 mm AA, 2 triple 12.75 inch torpedo tubes

Builders: Lorient Naval Dockyard, France.

moggy
25th February 2006, 15:32
Eithne will be escorted up the Rio de la Plata by the Argentinian Corvette ARA Guerrico.

This is the vessel that during the Falklands war, was fired upon my Royal Marines with a Carl Gustav 84mm during the "Battle of Grytviken" in South Georgia, while bombarding their position with its 100mm main armament. By the time the vessel escaped the Royal Marines range, it had taken over 1000 hits from various calibres of weapon, including 84mm, 66mm and 7.62mm.

Its pennant number? P32.

The Ship is known as a Drummond class locally, but was built in France as a D'Estienne D'Orves type, one of two destined for South Africa,but due to UN sanctions to South Africa they were not delivered and were bought by the Argentine Navy in 1978. The third ship of the class was ordered by Argentina and was delivered in 1981.

P-31 ARA Drummond (ex South African Good Hope)
P-32 ARA Guerrico (ex South African Transvaal)
P-33 ARA Granville
http://www.ara.mil.ar/La_Armada/MediosyCapacidades/Flota_de_Mar/Imagenes/Corbeta%20[Drumond]%2001.JPG


Displacement: 1,250 tons full load
Dimensions: 80.5 x 10.3 x 5.2 meters (264 x 34 x 17 feet)
Propulsion: 2 diesels, 2 shafts, 12,000 shp, 24 knots
Crew: 84
Radar: DRBV 51A air/surface search
Sonar: Diodon hull
Fire Control: 1 DRBC 32E
EW: DR 2000-53 intercept, Alligator jammer, 2 Syllex (33: Dagaie) chaff
Armament: 4 MM38 Exocet SSM, 1 100mm DP, 1 dual 40 mm AA, 2 20 mm AA, 2 triple 12.75 inch torpedo tubes

Builders: Lorient Naval Dockyard, France.




GOLDIE : ANY CAPTAIN REPORTS TODAY??

Goldie fish
25th February 2006, 16:37
No mog. sorry.

moggy
25th February 2006, 16:58
No mog. sorry.


cheer's

Goldie fish
27th February 2006, 09:02
LE EITHNE
DAILY JOURNAL

Captain’s Journal LE EITHNE – Friday 24th of February
This morning, we all wake as if we had not slept. The wind is a full gale and the seas are heaping up from the southeast. Our escort ship has (wisely) reviewed her rendezvous position so that it is closer to Mar Del Plata. My view is that the conditions are such that they are perhaps too extreme to justify the protocol of sending an escort to meet us, but this is a matter for the Argentine authorities and we are grateful that they will honour us in this way. As I look out on the grey wind swept waters it finally dawns on me as to why William Brown felt so at home in these seas – right now they look exactly like the squall ravaged waters of Blacksod bay on a dark winters day. While the probability of us experiencing these conditions are between 2 and 5 percent – when it occurred it must have brought Brown right home to his native Mayo – that is where my mind is right now.
We are now over 6000 nautical miles from Ireland. The air temperature has dropped to a cool 16 degrees which together with the gale also drags down our morale - at least a little. I am not unduly worried however because I simply could not see how the morale of the past two weeks could be sustained or go any higher – a slight dip today is timely leaving sufficient room to surge tomorrow when we enter Mar Del Plata.
Yesterday afternoon we had moved the generator out to the end of the flight deck. Even though it is well covered and protected from the elements on more than one occasion I thought of it overnight especially when we took a heavy wave. This generator along with a raft of other items were acquired by JJ O’Hara from the proceeds of the charity of the people of the Mayo and Galway. Such is the weight of the generator we used a block and tackle arrangement to give us the required purchase to haul it across the flight deck, using plywood sheeting to protect the paintwork. Once in position the ship’s company set to laying the deck for marquee. This was my second worry overnight – but I was well assured by the bosun PO Paul McCarthy that it was going nowhere.
By late afternoon we close the Argentinean coast and for the first time we see Argentinean soil. In some ways we are like a dog looking into a butcher shop so close but we still have nearly 24 hours before we enter the Port of Mar Del Plata. Besides torturing ourselves there is a practical reason why we close the coast to get a mobile phone signal. Within twenty minutes mobile phones, which have been dormant for the past two weeks, are popping up left right and centre.
At 1800 we sight the Naval Vessel Guerrico and we proceed to close her position. The wind has eased off to a force six and we do what we in the Irish Navy do best we despatch one of our boarding teams from six miles to close the Argentinean vessel. As I have mentioned before with an interception speed of up to 70 km per hour she can close the distance three times faster than LE Eithne and as dusk is approaching rapidly I am keen to get the formalities over with and get into the passage programme before our entrance to Mar Del Plata. ARA Guerrico then formally welcomes us as follows:
Ireland’s Navy Vessel LE Eithne this is Argentine’s Navy Vessel Guerrico. In the name of the Commander of the Naval Atlantic area Capitan De Vaio Roque Andres De Vicenzo, the Commander of the Navy Patrol Division Capitan De Navio Eduardo Castro Rivas and the Commander Task Element, Officers and Crew of this Warship welcome to Argentinean waters. For us it is a great privilege and honour to receive and sail with a warship of the heroic Irish Navy who carry the traditions and the blood of our most important Navy hero your fellow countryman Admiral William Brown. We truly believe that this visit will serve to reinforce even more the historical bonds that join us.
We wish you the greatest success in your task and we expect you to enjoy your time to the maximum in our country.
In response LE Eithne extended the following reply:
Argentine Naval Vessel Guerrico this is the Irish Naval Flag Vessel Eithne on behalf of Commodore Frank Lynch Flag Officer Commanding Irish Naval Service, Captain James Robinson Officer Commanding Naval Operations Command, the entire Irish Naval Service and the people of Ireland, Commander Mark Mellett fellow county man of your great hero Admiral William Brown and the crew of LE Eithne wish to thank you for your welcome and honouring us with your presence in this difficult weather. We have come a long way full of excitement and with high expectations and we look forward to our visit to your great country. With Spirit and Courage we have faced the unknown the same spirit and courage that your great hero and our countryman Admiral William Brown shared with your people.
As the greetings concluded LE Eithne’s executive officer Lt Cdr Aedh McGinn with the agility of a trapeze artist and accompanied by Ensign Sean Linehan boarded ARA Guerrico on its starboard side. Gifts were exchanged and the passage plan to Mar Del Plata was agreed. As dusk set in Aedh and Sean were again in the port Jaguar under the command of Able Seaman Adam Purcell and returning to LE Eithne. In doing so they reinforced what is the Irish Navy’s niche area of expertise, heavy weather small boat operations. With the Jaguar hoisted we set course for the overnight passage to Mar Del Plata carrying out a variety of evolutions underway such as signal lamp exchanges.
As I finish my journal for today ARA Guerrico is taking up position in our wake. With the evolutions now completed we will stay in company overnight. We switch our hangar red night lighting to white as we gather for the final of our darts competition (which is won instyle by Supply Paddy Lawlor beating Mechanician Patrick Collins). Already the morale metre indicates a rise, the lights of Mar Del Plata glow on the horizon and every sailor on board LE Eithne feels honoured and privileged for having been described as the blood of Argentina’s most important Navy hero our fellow countryman Admiral William Brown.
Midday Posn (Z) Irish Time –37 07S 56 06W
Dist to Cork – 6015 nm (nautical miles)
Dist to Mar De Plata – 88 nm

a historic day.

Brian McGrath
27th February 2006, 15:37
Thanks Goldie Fish for being first to post the latest news from LE Eithne, do you know when Saturdays and Sundays will be available its great reading and it makes you very proud of the LE Eithne and the crew.

Brian

ackack
27th February 2006, 17:29
They're already up on military.ie i've just finished reading them.

Goldie fish
28th February 2006, 20:40
LE EITHNE
DAILY JOURNAL
Captain’s Journal LE EITHNE – Monday 27th of February
Today will be the busiest day since we have arrived in Argentina so some of us rise before 7am for a session in the gym doing a series of “supersets” consisting of bench press, lateral raise, chin ups, pull downs and so on. Within the Naval Service the physical requirements for diving are such that you must maintain a higher than normal standard of physical fitness. Getting it out of the way early means that no matter how busy the day becomes you have your session complete and it also means you meet the day with the right frame of mind.
At 0900 the Irish Ambassador to Argentina HE Martin O Fanin boards LE Eithne. He has flown up from Buenos Aires and will accompany me on the calls of protocol to the Commander of the Naval Base and also the calls of custom to the Mayor of Mar Del Plata and the Chairman of the City Council. These calls are quite formal and medals and swords are worn. It is normal for an exchange of gifts to take place as well as plaques. The Base commander is Captain Vincenzo and he greets us in his headquarters. He explains that it is a great honour to have a visit by Ireland’s Flagship and assures me that he will continue to make available whatever resources he can to ensure our visit to Mar Del Plata is a great success. Captain Vincenzo then accompanies the Ambassador and myself to visit the mayor. We arrive at the town hall in the centre of Mar Del Plata – it is bustling with activity – democracy in action. The mayor then bestows an unexpected honour on the Ambassador, Mr JJ O’Hara and myself declaring us “Guests of Honour” presenting us with a certificate in which the “Articles” of the honour are set out.
We then complete our calls with a visit to the Chairman of the Local Government. I notice that our liaison officer continues to watch the time closely and just before 12 am with calls complete we are being driven at speed to a wreath laying ceremony at the statue of Admiral William Brown. We arrive at the square to find a crowd of several hundred people have gathered applauding as the cars pull up. The Argentine Naval Band strikes up and LE Eithne’s ships company come to attention. The Ambassador and myself are escorted to our position and the significance of our visit to Mar Del Plata is explained to the gathered citizens who continue to applaud. There is a sense of great joy and genuine appreciation with people old and young calling in Spanish and English – welcome to Argentina, welcome to our country. The Ambassador and I lay the wreath and take up our position for the conclusion of the ceremony as the band play St Patrick’s Day in the Morning. With the ceremony finished people come forward shaking hands and greeting us – “my name is Moore my family came here from Ireland in 1857”, “my name is Lennon my family came here in 1876”. Some people with no English just shake our hand – I feel like a politician after a successful election convention. It is now 1235 and we are behind schedule – back to the cars and we speed off to visit the Spanish research vessel Hesperides (A-33) which has stopped off in Mar Del Plata after a cruise in the Antarctica. A reception is held onboard the vessel and we exchange greetings and plaques. At 1325 we depart for LE Eithne where I am to host a lunch at 1330. At the lunch return calls will be taken from those I have already called on this morning. We have an Irish menu of starter with Clonakilty puddings on a bed of lettuce with a main course Irish spring lamb with brown bread. The chefs have done a great job but I realise I should have opted for something a little lighter. Lunch is finished by 1500 and the guests depart – an interview with Icanews English Language newspaper is postponed from 1600 to 1900. I have three free hours before our evening reception and I go for a run. The run gives provides the chance to plan the greeting for the evening reception – it also helps me unwind.
The interview with Icanews goes well – I think! By 1915 guests are gathering on the quay wall. The Argentine Band has also taken up position. Sunset will be at 1934 and I sense that the Naval guests will not board until the ceremony is complete. At sunset we lower our national colours – first we pipe the still and then the carry on and as we do the Argentine band plays “Evening Colours”. Then the guests board. The guests are a mixture of political, judicial, military and Mar Del Plata citizens including a significant number of second and third generation Irish. The reception is an outstanding success with the music of the Argentine Naval Band providing the entertainment up to my address. In my address amongst other things I say that William Brown who’s courage and spirit helped define the Argentine Nation is our blood brother. We then introduce our new secret weapon LE Eithne’s band called “Hercules” after William Brown’s flagship– they steal the show. Before the evening ends Leading Seaman Mark Ansboro and his team including WO John Walsh, PO Chef Eddie Stauton, Chiel Electrician Tom Kelly, Senior Chief Robie Byrne, PO Paul McCarthy and Seaman Fergal McDonagh have our guests waltzing to the music of When Irish Eyes are Smiling. Our last event in Mar Del Plata has been a WOW – tomorrow we sail for Buenos Aires – more about that later.
Midday Posn (Z) Irish Time –38 02S 57 32W (Alongside Mar Del Plata)
Dist to Cork – 6100 nm (nautical miles)
Dist to Mar De Plata (Centre) – 1 nm


ANother update

Goldie fish
1st March 2006, 19:50
http://www.defesanet.com.br/rv/unitas_05/alide_rj/ara_f45_robinson.jpg

In the latest leg of its trip, Eithne is being accompanied up the River Plate by the vessel above, ARA Robinson.
Its a MEKO 140 class, Locally known as Espora, and entered service in 2000, after its building was delayed due to economic reasons.
Note the Alouette 3 on the helideck. I'm sure Cdr Mellett is paying close attention to this also.

hptmurphy
1st March 2006, 21:45
Jaysus...Jim Robinson isn't dead yet and the Argies are naming ships after him....Irish Naval heroes.....whats next..ARA Moggy?

Brian McGrath
5th March 2006, 12:39
Did anyone see the 6pm news on RTE yesterday evening they showed a piece of the Eithnes visit to Argentina including the crew in uniform laying a wreath, the showed a shot of Eithne in dock and she looked very impressive, pity about the weather it was lashing rain.

By the way what do people on the board think about the Bronze Statue of Admiral Browne that Eithne is bringing home, they say its going to be erected in Dublins Docklands, I would have thought it would be put in Mayo.


Brian

moggy
5th March 2006, 19:24
Did anyone see the 6pm news on RTE yesterday evening they showed a piece of the Eithnes visit to Argentina including the crew in uniform laying a wreath, the showed a shot of Eithne in dock and she looked very impressive, pity about the weather it was lashing rain.

By the way what do people on the board think about the Bronze Statue of Admiral Browne that Eithne is bringing home, they say its going to be erected in Dublins Docklands, I would have thought it would be put in Mayo.


Brian
I wonder did the argies buy that from the a/corps january sale
whats wrong with a ship named after the Mog

DeV
5th March 2006, 22:07
There is already a statue of Admiral Browne in Wexford town.

Bitter Boy
5th March 2006, 22:42
Are you sure you are not confusing Admiral Brown with Admiral John Barry - one of the founding fathers of the American Navy?

There is definitely a statue of John Barry in Wexford - As most SM/NSR personnel know only too well as we get caught for the guard of honour there every year.

Sluggie
5th March 2006, 22:59
Bitter Boy - are you sure you're not confusing Admiral John Barry with Commodore John Barry?

Goldie fish
5th March 2006, 23:24
I don't see why there would be a statur to Admiralante Guilermo Brown in wexford, given that he is from Co Mayo...

hptmurphy
6th March 2006, 00:20
Its Commodore John Barry alright....Often held a .303 at the salute while some yank in a costume had a look at us.

It was funny I was there the year the Marita Anne was detained....it must have been the biggest IRA outing in years..but in their eyes we were directly responsible.....A 17 year old reservist with a rifle three times my age..with a bloody sharp bayonet. I remember at least one guy coming to Whites hotel after we were fed and attempting to have his viewpoint heard...something about bayonets and babies.

Just goes to prove there is no such thing as a free lunch!

Bitter Boy
6th March 2006, 14:53
Bitter Boy - are you sure you're not confusing Admiral John Barry with Commodore John Barry?

I think he was postumously promoted......only a couple of weeks ago:tri:

DeV
6th March 2006, 21:20
I am confusing these two famous Irishmen apologies.

Sluggie
7th March 2006, 00:26
The reason the statue is being erected in Dublin's docklands is that one of the new streets created by the redevelopment of the area is to be named after Admiral Brown.

This is one of the most popular street names in Argentina. A bit like many Irish towns having an O'Connell St.

Sluggie
7th March 2006, 00:58
Captain's diary updated on Naval Assocation Website. Not yet on Military.ie.

http://homepage.eircom.net/~navalass2/weekfour.htm

DeV
7th March 2006, 18:51
Nice to see, the flagship of the NS, LE Eithne, is one of the 50 best places to work in Ireland!!

Brian McGrath
8th March 2006, 11:23
Having read the latest diary reports its certainly no picnic for the crew of Eithne, they must be shattered looking after all the various guests, doing their hospital visits, cleaning and getting the ship ready for the next reception, they are a credit to the Navy and Country

Brian

Goldie fish
8th March 2006, 19:23
Week Five seems to have made it onto Military.ie...

However on closer inspection, the link points to the editors own PC...

Brian McGrath
9th March 2006, 23:36
Goldie
As a matter of interest do you know whats wrong on mil.ie I cant read the diary at all as it only loads the first two weeks, you cant read week five at all

Brian

yooklid
10th March 2006, 01:12
Goldie
As a matter of interest do you know whats wrong on mil.ie I cant read the diary at all as it only loads the first two weeks, you cant read week five at all

Brian

As he said, whoever is editing the page forgot to dereference the local pointers.

-Y

Sluggie
10th March 2006, 01:53
Brian,

View it on the naval assocation's website following the link in my previous post. This is also a longer unedited version of Cdr. Mellet's diary. The NA website also has the new instalments at least a few hours ahead of military.ie each day and is sometimes days ahead.

Brian McGrath
10th March 2006, 22:53
Thanks Sluggie for the info

Brian

Goldie fish
15th March 2006, 12:05
Should Be Arriving in Rio De Janero today. Sounds like a Nice pace to be for Paddys Day...

http://www.geraldbrimacombe.com/Brazil/Brazil%20-Rio%20de%20Janeiro%20City%205x8.jpg

Brian McGrath
16th March 2006, 21:52
Hi Guys

Just a bit of info for you I have a friend in RTE who tells me that they are hoping to show some live links to the Eithne during the news at 6pm tomorrow, dont have the exact time its on but hopefully it will happen.

PS Dont shoot the messenger if it does not happen..

Brian

Goldie fish
17th March 2006, 01:13
Thanks Brian, Possibly in the Paddys Day round up...

Jim Fahy reports from a St Patrick's Day party on board the LE Eithne in Rio de Janeiro
(http://dynamic.rte.ie/av/228-2124691.smil)

Goldie fish
25th April 2006, 06:41
Ah so much lost in the last month.

However a Documentary is in the process of being made.

Message from Timesnap:


One "The Crew Cut", as we have fondly termed it, will be of more specific interest and is aimed at the crew on the deployment and those in empathy with that perspective. This is expected to be ready within a fortnight and we are taking bookings for it at €10 if collected from the ship and €12 to include postage if it is required by mail. Needless to say we would be delighted if your website users should wish to secure copies of the DVD.
The second version of the documentary will be aimed at a general viewing audience and will be pitched to RTE rather than being published on DVD.

For more details contact TIMESNAP (info@timesnap.com)

http://www.timesnap.com/index.html

magister
9th May 2006, 20:08
Whats the story with getting a dvd of the Eithne?

McCarthy
9th May 2006, 20:39
Im certain it'll be advertised.

moggy
9th May 2006, 21:52
I just sent an email to Declan in Timesnap for info regarding Dvd Etc
so stand/bye will get back to you

moggy
10th May 2006, 21:00
Film Crew Are Still Editing The Dvd - They Are 3/4 Done But Will Take
Another Week Or So - They Will Advise Me When Ready.

McCarthy
10th May 2006, 23:11
Thanks for the update.

Goldie fish
4th June 2006, 12:48
Timesnaps website has a great promotional clip for the Naval service that consists of footage taken before and during the Argentina trip.

it can be viewed HERE (http://www.timesnap.com/video/navy.swf)

It does take a while to download though...but its worth it.

Anyone hear any more about the DVD?

moggy
6th June 2006, 14:57
still working on dvd - I talked to the staff last friday still has to be finally approved by the high up in ns - they will advise me when ready

kayleighanne03
6th June 2006, 18:08
Hey Guys,
Long Time No Talk, Just Ref That Dvd,was Talking To Declan On Board Last Week And He Said It Was On The Way But Dont Think Ill Hold My Breath, Also Thanks Goldie I Just Had A Cringe Moment Watching Myself On Your Rte Clip, Everyone Saw Me On It But I Didnt Think Id Have To Relive It Myself !! Ha Ha

Goldie fish
6th June 2006, 19:34
Just wait till everyone buys the dvd.....and then itl'l appear on TV....You'll be more famous than those crowd who go on those reality TV talent shows...

hptmurphy
7th June 2006, 00:26
where me copy..I sent the cheque eventually!

Goldie fish
25th June 2006, 12:47
Any progress on the DVD? Will I have it in time for christmas?

ocean
25th June 2006, 15:00
Are they really going to do a DVD - I thought they were just doing a documentary?

Goldie fish
25th June 2006, 15:31
If they are not doing a DVD then they have relieved many of 12 euro for nothing...

ocean
25th June 2006, 15:37
Oops have just read back along the thread - it looks like it will be good. I have sent them an e-mail to their contact point at the website so I'll see what they come back with.

Goldie fish
10th July 2006, 20:24
Any update on the DVD?

moggy
10th July 2006, 22:37
no i sent an email to declan 2 weeks ago (nothing back yet)
you said you wanted it for christmas you didn't say what christmas

Buddy
21st August 2006, 23:05
The video that was made an independent film company for the navy on board Le Eithne, can anyone recall the website that belongs to the people who made it, i remember reading it in a thread but cant remember which , perhaps you can help Goldie, Thanks

Goldie fish
21st August 2006, 23:06
Remember the search function.

Goldie fish
12th October 2006, 20:03
The DVD is now available. My copy was delivered today, Thanks to all at Timesnap Productions.

It gives a great insight to life aboard ship.