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  • Disposal of spares...

    Hi all
    There I was, in Porter's of Newbridge, having a free read of the Cosantoir,going thru an article about S and T, about DF vehicle logistics,etc when there came a line about throwing out soft-skin spares after two years and hard-skin spares after five.I thought, duck fat, that can't be right, shurely shome mishtake!? two years only? Why? Anyone care to enlighten me why perfectly good stuff gets ditched so soon...
    regards
    GttC

  • #2
    Originally posted by GoneToTheCanner View Post
    Hi all
    There I was, in Porter's of Newbridge having a free read of the Cosantoir,,going thru an article about S and T, about DF vehicle logistics,etc when there came a line about throwing out soft-skin spares after two years and hard-skin spares after five.I thought, duck fat, that can't be right, shurely shome mishtake!? two years only? Why? Anyone care to enlighten me why perfectly good stuff gets ditched so soon...
    regards
    GttC
    Har Har - was doing the same thing elsewhere myself.

    The only thing I can think of is that the manufacturer's warranty for the part would have expired, and so, no benefit to storing that part, if not being used?
    Last edited by FMolloy; 2 October 2006, 20:26.
    "Well, stone me! We've had cocaine, bribery and Arsenal scoring two goals at home. But just when you thought there were truly no surprises left in football, Vinnie Jones turns out to be an international player!" (Jimmy Greaves)!"

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    • #3
      "Nowadays things are different though due to the demands of health and safety... "
      The reason given in the article. TD is probably right with regard to the warranty.

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      • #4
        Hi there
        It strikes me that if you are dumping stuff after only two years, regardless of warranty, then you are consuming large amounts of money to sustain a defined level, rather than focusing on what you actually consume. In the aviation world, we divide spares into rotables(overhaulable items) and consumables(tyres, batteries, bulbs,etc) and we use reliability engineering to divine how much we can expect to use in a year.Airlines rarely keep large amounts of stock on hand, any more, and work with suppliers to ensure that the right part is available as soon as possible when needed.I'm sure the Air Corps have something similar. We also try and crossmatch items to see if they can be used across different aircraft (bulbs, hardware,etc). Users are much more proactive about spares holdings these days and try to get away from the days of sheds full of obsolete stuff (not good news, necessarily, for collectors and museums).
        regards
        GttC

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        • #5
          The UK has been doing the stroing and disposal routine for many years now, and this is where people like Whithams ply their trade. However they also routinely dispose of vehicles regardless of use, ensuring that the equipment in use always has a ready stock of up to date parts.

          As an aside, I notice the new nissans are Automatic Transmission, as is the Iveco Drops. Has the standard H fallen out of favour with the DF or is there some other reason?


          Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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          • #6
            I presume they have enough cop-on in CVBWs to insure that the quantities of spares that is waded every year is kept as low as possible while ensuring vehicles can be put back on the road ASAP.

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            • #7
              I presume that the stock which is 'disposed of' is sold off rather than just dumped/recycled ?
              IRISH AIR CORPS - Serving the Nation.

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