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  • National Aviation College

    I'm new to the board, and my expertise as regards aircraft is fairly limited, but I'd like to get informed views on an idea I've had for a while now. Owing to the success of the National Maritime College in Haulboline, would a similar third level college be viable for the aviation sector in Ireland? That is, have all non - military flight training for both the DF and civilian sector conducted from one college. This facility could be based in Baldonnel and would allow civilians to access commercial flight training easier than the current system, which i'm not pretty sure of, but believe that it is quite difficult. It would also allow a crossover of corporate knowledge between the military and civilian sector and could even facilitate the training of non - AC pilots such as Gardai for the GASU or Naval Service.

    I would also suggest expanding the college to include the training of technical staff, such as aircraft techs. and AT controllers?? Also allowing for an exchange in knowledge between the AC and civvies?

    Any thoughts on the issue would be greatly appreciated!
    "We do not govern to rule, we govern to serve" Gen. Michael Collins

  • #2
    It seems like an idea, but I somehow doubt that anyone would be willing to put up the funding for it. This of course means that an existing university would have to create it as part of its system, as the Cork Institute of Tech did in the case of the Maritime Institute.
    "Everyone's for a free Tibet, but no one's for freeing Tibet." -Mark Steyn. What an IMO-centric quote, eh?

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    • #3
      Hi there
      Access is commercial flight training is widespread and easily available. Just leave Ireland, bring your chequebook, attend a JAR-approved school in the UK/USA/S.Africa/Europe/Australia/Canada and pass all your exams and flight tests, then fund an MCC course and a Type rating and you'll be ready to try for the airlines.There are also plenty of schools for maintenance training.........there is no shortage of aircraft engineers, just jobs that pay decent money.
      regards
      GttC

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      • #4
        Originally posted by GoneToTheCanner View Post
        Hi there
        Access is commercial flight training is widespread and easily available. Just leave Ireland, bring your chequebook, attend a JAR-approved school in the UK/USA/S.Africa/Europe/Australia/Canada and pass all your exams and flight tests, then fund an MCC course and a Type rating and you'll be ready to try for the airlines.There are also plenty of schools for maintenance training.........there is no shortage of aircraft engineers, just jobs that pay decent money.
        regards
        GttC
        Or if your lucky like a mate of mine was get it all paid for by a nice airline, hehehe.
        Lifes a bitch, so be her pimp!

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        • #5
          There used to be a Commercial pilot training college in cork back in the early 90s. It closed.


          Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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          • #6
            In the times of the Chipmunk the AC actually trained Aer Lingus pilots.

            The NMCI is a public private partnership. It is owned by a consortium called Focus Education (comprised of Bovis Lend Lease and Bank of Scotland. Vita Lend Lease operate and run the facilities and buildings of NMCI for a period of 25 years. Usually PPP works by transferring ownership to the State after this period, but I'm not sure if this is the case with NMCI.

            The faculty of NMCI is part of Cork Institute of Technology, with additional personnel provided by the NS.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by DeV View Post
              The faculty of NMCI is part of Cork Institute of Technology, with additional personnel provided by the NS.
              That is incorrect. The NMCI is a partnership between the NS & CIT. Both are equal partners in the NMCI. You make it sound like the CIT run the NMCI alone. They do not. There are CIT only, NS only and joint NS-CIT courses run in the NMCI.

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              • #8
                Hi there
                Access is commercial flight training is widespread and easily available. Just leave Ireland, bring your chequebook, attend a JAR-approved school in the UK/USA/S.Africa/Europe/Australia/Canada and pass all your exams and flight tests, then fund an MCC course and a Type rating and you'll be ready to try for the airlines.There are also plenty of schools for maintenance training.........there is no shortage of aircraft engineers, just jobs that pay decent money.
                regards
                GttC
                You don't even have to leave Ireland you've the PTC in waterford and other facilitys in Cork and Weston for Pilot training.

                In relation to maintanence thats generally achieved through apprenticeships with maintanence companys and FÁS, as well as DIT and Carlow IT.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by kermit
                  In Ireland, you not only need your chequebook, you also need a surgeon for the arm and leg you will be donating, and a large tub of vaseline for the rogering you'll get.
                  Knew someone would beat me to saying it.

                  But seriously its cheaper if you go abroad to do it plus you get the weather.
                  A mate did her PPL in South Africa(she also got her boobs done, loving this medical tourism business), another went to Florida for his PPL he is the lad now getting trainer up by FLY-BE that I mention earlier in the thread.
                  I think I still have some info on the flying schools that they went to PM me if you want it.
                  Lifes a bitch, so be her pimp!

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                  • #10
                    Ireland's one of the cheapest in Europe as far as I know. With PTC your talking 60 or 70 thousand thats probably gone up with fuel costs though. When you compare it to places Like Oxford aviation and Flight Traing Europe in Jerez where your talking over 100,000, Ireland starts to look not so bad after all.

                    Part of PTC's training is in America by the way.
                    Last edited by Roger McGee; 12 March 2007, 13:26.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Roger McGee View Post
                      Ireland's one of the cheapest in Europe as far as I know. With PTC your talking 60 or 70 thousand thats probably gone up with fuel costs though. When you compare it to places Like Oxford aviation and Flight Traing Europe in Jerez where your talking over 100,000, Ireland starts to look not so bad after all.

                      Part of PTC's training is in America by the way.
                      As far as I can remember my mate that did her PPL(Private Pilots licence) spent about 3-4K getting it and about another 3K on her norks, as far as I can remember she spent about 10K all in all for everthing including boozing and travel etc.
                      Admittedly that was almost 3 years ago at this stage so I cannot be certain if the echange rate has stayed the same and/or the costs have increased in RSA.

                      The full CPL(i.e Commercial Pilots License with Instument rating) when I looked at it, was abouut 40-50K as far as I can remember. In all honesty didnt look at it for too long as it was way outa my price range, way way way way out of it.
                      Lifes a bitch, so be her pimp!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Roger McGee View Post
                        Ireland's one of the cheapest in Europe as far as I know. With PTC your talking 60 or 70 thousand thats probably gone up with fuel costs though. When you compare it to places Like Oxford aviation and Flight Traing Europe in Jerez where your talking over 100,000, Ireland starts to look not so bad after all.

                        Part of PTC's training is in America by the way.
                        Wrong. PTC quoted me over 30k for CPL and Multi Engine Instrument Rating. Went to Spain and saved myself fifteen grand.Add in your accommodation and/or petrol plus living expenses which are increased here due to delays because of inclement weather and you save a lot more.

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                        • #13
                          Hi there
                          I agree with JJ. Go west, young man, or East or anywhere else except Ireland. Save time, money, hassle and extra effort.
                          regards
                          GttC

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                          • #14
                            http://www.dttas.ie/sites/default/fi...5-2017/iaa.pdf

                            Looks like the IAA is suggestion something along the lines of NMCI with AC involvement

                            See page 9

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                            • #15
                              The AC should really get involved, could help improve the AC and generate income.

                              I'm surprised they didn't get involved in College Ireland but it looks like a good few organisations have pulled out
                              http://cias.ie

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