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  • Papa 242
    replied
    It's covered to do what they call "public transport winching"...basicly, the aircraft must be in an approx. 10 ft hover over a flat deck in benign sea conditions! Any lower and they could step onto the deck from the aircraft!!

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  • Goldie fish
    replied
    No.
    I'd say its to drop staff onto ships without helipad.

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  • Jetjock
    replied
    Does it have any SAR role, given the hoist?

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  • Goldie fish
    replied
    Different machine completely. FOST have a 365N, which is basically the civilian model. Cilvilian operated, on the Military register.( I think we discussed other aircraft that do the same).

    They have 2 since 1999, based in Plymouth airport. Its used to bring FOST staff to ships in the channel.

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  • RoyalGreenJacket
    replied


    i never knew we had the Dauphin 2 aswell?
    Attached Files

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  • hptmurphy
    replied
    They'll need a lot of work to get 244 and 245 back navalised again
    Not really, the floatation gear was standard as were the crash proof tanks' the harpoon should still work although it will probably be replaced. Most of the Nav fit could be simplified and weight reduced so its all quite feasible.

    The dauphin is quite a capable little machine in the right circumstances, but we just expected far too much from it.

    The french still use the bog standard one as do in the basic anti submarine role and for some short range SAR work from ships.

    Once you have the right ship and are aware of the limitations of the aircraft it wouldn't be a bad deal

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  • Goldie fish
    replied
    They'll need a lot of work to get 244 and 245 back navalised again.

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  • pilatus
    replied
    According to the article they are in talks over the potential buy of the 4 Dauphins, nothing solid yet.Il scan the article and post it here when i get home form work!

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  • easyrider
    replied
    According to Air Forces Monthly, the Chilean Navy are buying the four ex-Air Corps Dauphins. They already have three of the type, used for coastguard roles. The Dauphins will also be deployed on Chile's new OPVs. (Hope they have better luck with that than we did.)

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  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    Hi JJ
    The Dauphins were an avionics hybrid, as you said.The LCD replacement screens are very common now.We could argue til sunrise about how good/bad/indifferent they were,etc but they were flogged off to cover ass and move money to the 139s.They couldn't achieve their original mission with all the options fitted.They were sold too soon though.
    regards
    GttC

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  • hptmurphy
    replied
    Good Riddance to the dauphins.

    1970s technology,

    They were so under powered they were actually dangerous and their range was so short the Pilots carried shell cards!

    If you look at what is being done with them now..they are film props and overpriced air taxis....hardly what we need for a militray force trying to look forward.


    Should we have refurbished the Comet tanks as MBTs becuse that was their classification at the time and some one thought we needed MBTs.

    Dauphins.. good luck to bad rubbish!!!

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  • pym
    replied
    was the search radar taken out before they were sold?

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  • warthog
    replied
    but the sar choppers had winch/the choppers emergency flotation gear/multiple life rafts/ tonnes of medical and highline gear stretchers,even the harpoon on two of them
    all that could be removed to lighten the airframe

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  • watcher365
    replied
    Hi again all,
    The question still remains, what would you do with them. They were woefully underpowered and with full fuel struggled to lift more pax than the allouettes did.
    Rotorleasing, in effect, did very little to the Dauphins bar certification and a lick of paint! The engines weren't upgraded to N3 which was the main cost factor behind the 2 million per airframe you are referring to. looking at the Rotorleasing website it seems that a lot of time was spent sorting out the inventory. If you look at the cockpit in the video some of the placards on the instruments are carried over from Air Corps service.
    Yes the dauphins were sold for very little but money aside, they couldnt really continue to offer the Air Corps much in the way of service.
    Just my view on things

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  • Jetjock
    replied
    Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
    Unless I'm mistaken, they binned the 5 screen EFIS.
    There's still 5 screens there, if as is most probable, the instruments on the right are duplicated on the left.
    You can see both the PFD(Primary Flight Display) and the Nav display on the PIC side. At one stage you can see the digital Artificial Horizion(PFD display) and at a later stage you can see a dark screen directly underneath displaying a compass rose(Nav Display).

    There is a centre display console also.Most probably either an FMC(Flight Management Computer) or FADEC display(Full Authority Digital Engine Control). As far as I'm aware and GTTC might clarify, the Dauphins were always a digital/analogue hybrid, that most likely accounting for the large number of analogue instruments in the cockpit. That instrumentation layout would be typical of many fixed wing commercial aircraft of that era, for example the Boeing 757/767 models.

    What also likely, though it would be very difficult to ascertain, is that they are replacement LCD modules rather than the CRT original units. From what I can see from the little glimpse on the video, the graphical information layout is exactly the same as modern units but as I haven't seen the original displays I can't say for sure.

    The more I see these videos, the more obvious it is becoming that it might have been a mistake to sell them off. If a small private firm can refurbish them to that high a standard, why couldn't Dept of Defence come up with the cash for it? The figure of €2mil/aircraft was obviously a number plucked out of the sky to push the AW139 purchase through. One just has to look at how much these aircraft are available for...$1.8mil. Beggers belief!

    One option would be buy them all back for $7.2m! A tiny €4.6m at today's exchange rate!
    Subtract from that what Rotor Leasing paid for them and that's surely a good bit of business! Much better than the €8m that was quoted for upgrading them two year's ago! We still have Dauphin qualified pilots. It's a no brainer! Does anyone have Willie O'Dea's number?! It's either the Air Corps or some Hollywood movie company! That machine has a starring role in the next big action blockbuster written all over it. The skies over Ireland are still feeling the loss of that beautiful Turbomeca Arriel sound! Bring them home!
    Last edited by Jetjock; 16 March 2008, 01:07.

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