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Alouette 3 Retires.

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    timhorgan
    Banned User

  • timhorgan
    replied
    The Alouette III was originally purchased by the Rhodesians pre UDI. Later a large number of Alouette IIIs were covertly obtained from various sources to increase the capability of No. 7 Squadron and also to replenish the squadron for various losses suffered both by accidents and while on combat missions.

    In the 1970s South African Air Force (SAAF) Alouette III helicopters were attached to No. 7 Squadron, Rhodesian Air Force. The Alouette III was also the choice of the South African Air Force which meant that training facilities and expertise could be shared. The Portuguese Air Force had also purchased Alouette IIIs.

    For Fireforce missions a gunship version of the Alouette III was fitted with a Matra MG 151/20 20 mm cannon. The 'K-Car', as it was known, was operated usually with a crew of three, (pilot, gunner and fireforce commander). The 'K-Car' was used as a mobile command post to allow the army commander of the heli-borne troops to direct their operations from the air above them.

    Ammunition for the 20mm Cannon was carried in a special bin in the left hand baggage compartment and fed to the cannon via a feed tray through the rear bulkhead. The spent brass was collected in a compartment below the cabin floor. The ammunition bin was supposed to be able to carry 440 rounds of 20mm ammuninition, but typically, only 400-410 rounds were loaded. The gunner in the 'K-Car' was also a technician and therefore he was not only the gunner, but also responsible for all the maintenance of his aircraft.

    A Rhodesian Alouette III, 'K-Car' had the distinction of shooting down a Botswana Defence Force Islander on 9 August 1979 with its 20mm cannon.

    The standard troop carrying/utility version of the Alouette III in the Rhodesian Air Froce were called 'G-Cars'. They were used by No. 7 Squadron for the troop transport, light air/ground fire support, SAR, casualty evacuation (CASEVAC) and a variety of other roles.

    Rhodesian practice was to operate the 'G-Car' with a gunner/technician and to mount twin Mk 2 .303 Brownings machine guns, with about 400 rounds per gun. As with the 'K-Car', not only did the technician fly in combat and operate the aircraft's weapons, he was also responsible for all the maintenance of the helicopter too.

    In the troop carrying role, a "Stick" of four soldiers was the standard load for the RhAF Alouette III. The seating configuration was two in the rear of the cabin, beside the gunner/technician and behind the pilot, with the "Stick commander" in the centre and his MAG gunner beside him. The other two riflemen were in the front on the rear facing bench seat. Experience in combat led the Rhodesians to remove all but the pilot's door on the 'G-Car' and to reverse the front passengers to widen the available floorspace and gain flexibility. With the doors removed, it was easier for the soldiers to leave the helicopter quickly. Reversing the front seats opened up floor area and therefore more space for internal cargo was available. The standard Sud Aviation front seats in the 'G-Car' were replaced in the Rhodesian Air Force by a "home made" rear facing bench seat. While carrying troops, casualties on a stretcher could be carried laterally across the rear of the cabin, one on the floor and another stretcher on a rack above it.

    In September 1974 Rhodesian Air Force Alouette IIIs were fitted with anti-STRELA shrouds on the engines, the tail pipe was turned up to deflect the hot exhaust gasses into the rotor downwash and they were given matt paint finishes. This was done to reduce the Infra Red signature of the helicopter and proved to be highly successful for the type.

    Several Alouettes were brought down by fire from the ground, but considering the intensity of operations, losses were surprisingly low. This was probably due to the highly skilled pilots' tactics of using ultra low level flying and terrain to keep out of the line of enemy fire.

    At one stage, 27 SAAF helicopters were deployed in Rhodesia. Within No. 7 Squadron, the SAAF Alouettes were designated as belonging to Alpha Flight.


    It did everything from Casevac to Fireforce-and we were told that there would always be one availabvle for casevac anywhere in the country within 30 minutes.

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  • Rhodes
    Brigadier General

  • Rhodes
    replied
    The Alouette III is still manufactured in India.

    Leave a comment:

  • GoneToTheCanner
    C/S

  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    Even by then, there will probably be an Alouette rattling around somewhere. Can't kill a good thing...
    regards
    GttC

    Leave a comment:


  • DeV
    replied
    Read in AFM today that the Alouette III will continue to serve with the French Navy until 2020/21 !!!

    They have 15 left in service, tasked with all day SAR missions on board the Charles de Gaulle carrier.

    Leave a comment:

  • GoneToTheCanner
    C/S

  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    Nice ideas but you haven't tried to clear anything with obtuse DoD officials, have you? Right now, there are few civvies apart fom TK with ready access to the place and, as far as I now, access is still not allowed without an escort. The Museum knows full well that there is no shortage of volunteers, inside and out, but them upstairs have yet to be convinced.
    regards
    GttC

    Leave a comment:

  • Jetjock
    Commandant

  • Jetjock
    replied
    As regards security I would say that a standard background check would suffice. Volunteers with an actual interest would be easy to distinguish from someone with motives less than good. As a commercial pilot I hold a an airside id for example and in the past two weeks during the course of my work I have been in close proximity while on the ground with various military aircraft, government jets and even the Pope(no joke).

    I did a standard background check-done by a third party company and something like this could provide the basis for security checks on interested parties.

    Also the museum is contained in one hangar and does not threaten the security of the other hangars. Operation of volunteer work at pre determined times would also reduce the security impact. Also, I would venture that with the much improved security environment at home these days this idea has more of a chance now than it had 10/15 years ago.

    Leave a comment:

  • Boomer
    The Gaffer

  • Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by Vickers View Post
    Both of which can be overcome. It has been done before elsewhere.
    I think one way its been sorted before is for the group of volunteers to form a committee and to take responsibility for insuring and all costs associated with the work etc while the airframe and finished item remains the property of the state but they can display or whatever it for a set timeframe thus hopefully recovering the costs associated with the restoration work.

    Leave a comment:

  • Vickers
    .303 MMG

  • Vickers
    replied
    Originally posted by GoneToTheCanner View Post
    Hi there
    the volunteer idea has already been pushed but has been refused on insurance / security grounds.
    regards
    GttC
    Both of which can be overcome. It has been done before elsewhere.

    Leave a comment:

  • GoneToTheCanner
    C/S

  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    Hi there
    the volunteer idea has already been pushed but has been refused on insurance / security grounds.
    regards
    GttC

    Leave a comment:


  • pym
    replied
    Originally posted by GoneToTheCanner View Post
    ER, Flying pay, in the Don at least, is regarded as Professional Pay for pilots whereas Tech pay is regarded as Professional Pay for techs. Paul Fry is worth every cent of his FP whereas other senior pilots are just wastes of space..........there are plenty of techs who are not worth their tech pay, not to mind Flying pay.
    regards
    Gttc
    I think it's standard practise in a lot of other air forces to have Senior types keep their flying rating.

    In Belgium that was the main reason they kept their Fouga's airworthy I believe

    Leave a comment:

  • Jetjock
    Commandant

  • Jetjock
    replied
    I wonder if they would be open to the idea of voluntary work/ donation based like you see with a lot of projects in the UK. Ex-techs and other volunteers lending a hand. Like you see with railway preservation societies here like the RPSI and the ITG.

    Leave a comment:

  • GoneToTheCanner
    C/S

  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    Hi all,
    JJ, the Chippie was airworthy but was grounded as it was due a Major and no funds were forthcoming to do it.Provost 183 was more or less fit to fly and had a servicable engine, but again, no funds. The Avro Cadet is u/s due to a magneto problem.You could probably round up enough bits to get one Fouga flying but if they can't summon the will to get a simple Cadet or Chippie off the ground...
    regards
    GttC

    Leave a comment:

  • Test Pilot
    2/Lt

  • Test Pilot
    replied
    Originally posted by Papa 242 View Post
    Lovely to see the photo of Paul Fry and John Kealy T.P. They were on a V.I.P. flt... dig the snazzy green carpet and velour seat covers!!! A pain in the **l@ to fit.
    John is still in aviation in the uk, sends me emails every so often,also posts on world air pics and sounds as mad as ever!
    Glad to hear Paul Fry is still flying, in 33 yrs as a crewman with the Air Corps and Irish Coast Guard, he is truly one of the best pilots I've had the pleasure of flying with! And that includes Irish Air Corps,RAF,Royal Navy,U.S Air Force and civilian pilots.
    Why waste such talent... desk job or not!
    Again,thanks for the photo T.P.!
    Best Regards.
    John.
    John,

    I've just picked up on who you are mate. Nice to hear you are still alive and kicking. There are a few pics in the archive from the MR days, so I'll dig them out when I get back to the office next week.

    Talk soon! TP.

    Leave a comment:

  • Papa 242
    Private 3*

  • Papa 242
    replied
    Hi GttC!...Genuine shot, we were heading back to car before it rained again!!! and stopped for last look at helis....139,2 A109s,ch53,2 army lynx and 4 Sea Kings. 139 looked well in good company!
    I really hope they keep 195 going,it's a peice of our history now.Were any of the Marchettis retained?
    Regards, John

    Leave a comment:

  • Jetjock
    Commandant

  • Jetjock
    replied
    Air Forces Monthly reports that there are intentions to put 195 back into the air. Hopefully she will lead the line celebrating 50 years of helicopter flight in 2013.

    Im sure it's possible to do the same with a Chippie,Provost and Fouga but will we wever see it?

    Leave a comment:

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