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Air Corps chopper got in to difficulty?

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  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    Air Corps reports are not routinely published for public consumption. D248 was an exception.
    regards
    GttC

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  • DeV
    replied
    Thanks for clearing that up, the report isn't on the AAIU website, is it an internal report?

    Leave a comment:


  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    The door would have a posted maximum opening speed, if that was the case and would be able to withstand higher speeds if it absolutely had to.
    regards
    GttC

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  • concussion
    replied
    Maybe the force of it opening at speed broke whatever retaining pins/catches which hold it on?

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  • DeV
    replied
    So if the ground crew want/need to take the doors off they just open them and they slide off (without any other safety catches, pins, etc needing to be removed?

    What I'm trying to say/ask is how come in this pic the door hasn't fallen off? I presume there is something else that has to be done to make it fall off apart from just opening the door (thinking of the Merlin incident).

    http://fileserver.4pm.ie/Upload/19/19413-XQy.jpg

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  • Barry
    replied
    The door came off as a result of it opening in flight, Dev. It didn't just magically fall off of it's own accord.

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  • DeV
    replied
    There is a difference between the doors being open and the doors coming off!

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  • easyrider
    replied
    Inquiry result

    from www.herald.ie

    By Kevin Doyle
    Wednesday June 24 2009

    Pilot error has been blamed for a mid-air accident in which a door fell off an Air Corps' helicopter that was transporting a Government minister.

    An inquiry into how the door blew off the chopper carrying Tourism Minister Martin Cullen concluded the two pilots should have spotted the problem before take-off.

    Investigators said that neither the captain nor his co-pilot had scanned a display unit that would have warned them of the danger.

    This meant they failed to notice that the cabin door was not sealed properly prior to take-off from Killarney racecourse, on March 2. Shortly afterwards, the door of the Agusta Westland 139 helicopter came loose.

    Nobody on the ground was injured and the helicopter landed safely at the Killarney Golf and Fishing Club.

    The aircraft was about 500ft over the Killarney national park and travelling at 126 knots when the door became dislodged.

    The report notes that the AW 139 was on a VIP trip at the time. It had left Baldonnel with two passengers and made a stop in Waterford, where a third passenger came on board. In Killarney, the passengers disembarked for a meeting, while the crew refuelled and waited for their return.

    It was as the aircraft made a mid-air turn on the return journey that the sliding door opened and broke away.

    The crewman said he had been confident that the door was closed and locked.

    The pilot told investigators that he had been informed by a colleague that the right-hand door had been closed. He said he did not recollect scanning the crew alert system to confirm the doors were secure.

    Flight data analysis found that one or both cabin doors were open at all times during the incident. The system on the AW 139 does not differentiate between left and right doors.

    The inquiry concluded that the door could not have been fully closed prior to the locking handle being engaged, and the captain and co-pilot had failed to check the warning system.

    It has been recommended crew procedures be revised to include prompt confirmation that all doors are closed.

    The conclusions also suggest that warning systems should be updated to indicate which cabin doors are open.

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  • Tadpole
    replied
    I think Pym has a valid point. The attitude in this country has changed. We actually give a damn about what the government does with our money now.
    Thank you for making my point. Its all about money. Ministers arriving by helicopter to a factory where people are about to be made unemployed is now seen as unacceptable, regardless of the aircrafts colour. The people dont give a damn about an 'asset', most dont even give a damn if the DF exsisted or not.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jetjock
    replied
    Originally posted by Tadpole View Post
    The polititions dont give a crap what colour the helicopter is, to think so is just disillousions and fantasy.

    I dont agree. Parading around in something green and purposeful looking makes it look like they are taking an asset away from it's true tasking, whereas something white and dayglo could be assumed to be a dedicated VIP transport by Mr/Mrs Joe/Josephine Soap.

    I think Pym has a valid point. The attitude in this country has changed. We actually give a damn about what the government does with our money now.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tadpole
    replied
    The current change in attitude has nothing to do with 'Green' helicopters but is completely down to a failing economy and nasty PR caused by a perception of money wasting.
    Even in the land of big business many folk have sold their helicopters, not because of lack of money but because of peer pressure. i.e if your coming to a meeting with me dont be seen in a helicopter.
    Have a look at the next big race meeting, where are the helicopters? Outside the stand for all to see or removed and inconspicuous?
    The polititions dont give a crap what colour the helicopter is, to think so is just disillousions and fantasy.

    Leave a comment:


  • The real Jack
    replied
    Originally posted by pym View Post
    I may well be a mile off target, but I think painting the heli's green has proven to be a PR master stroke by the Air Corps.

    It has made it plainly obvious to any ordinary person that these are military machines, for military purposes - they are not taxi's for Ministers - and that added to the even more significant issue of our faltering economy has made images of TD's swanning around in them utterly unacceptable.

    Perhaps they should keep the Squirrel, remove the useful crime fighting bits, and give it a new lick of paint. It was good enough for the Royal Flight
    Cue the EC135's being painted grey!

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  • Goldie fish
    replied
    I think leaving the Machine gun, and gunner, in place should give the mini stir the hint too.

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  • hedgehog
    replied
    I dont know if thats what they intended Pym but

    it certainly the result

    even my wife asked why is the Government fying in Military helicopters

    where before she didnt even know there was Military Helicopters.

    I think your assumption is spot on

    Leave a comment:


  • pym
    replied
    I may well be a mile off target, but I think painting the heli's green has proven to be a PR master stroke by the Air Corps.

    It has made it plainly obvious to any ordinary person that these are military machines, for military purposes - they are not taxi's for Ministers - and that added to the even more significant issue of our faltering economy has made images of TD's swanning around in them utterly unacceptable.

    Perhaps they should keep the Squirrel, remove the useful crime fighting bits, and give it a new lick of paint. It was good enough for the Royal Flight

    Leave a comment:

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