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  • Where are the Helis?

    does anyone know if the agusta's are dropping hay or feed to livestock/remote farms?

    my dad did it in the puma in '82
    surely the government can't be so stupid that they won't scramble the Don?

  • #2
    Whatever about feedstuffs, they were busy yesterday.

    From DFPO Facebook:

    Originally posted by DF Press Office
    Statement – 6 January, 2010. 5.00pm

    The Air Corps have been requested to conduct four air ambulance operations in the last 24 hours to transport patients (in particular neo-natal patients) who cannot move by road due to the extreme weather conditions. All requests have been from the South of the country. All operations were, and will be, completed using the Air Corps Agusta Westland AW139 helicopter which is fitted with specialist medical suites called “lifepods” for just such an eventuality.

    The first operation was completed last night with the pilots flying using Night Vision Goggles (NVG) for the entire flight, another completed this afternoon and two more to be completed by tomorrow morning.

    The Air Corps has an AW139 helicopter and crew on Standby 24 hours a day for Air Ambulance. Last year we conducted 78 Air Ambulance Operations, 44 in our AW139 helicopters, 26 in the CASA Maritime Patrol aircraft and 8 in the Government Learjet.



    The Air Corps Air Ambulance service covers:



    · Inter-hospital transfer of patients with spinal or other serious injury;

    · Transport of Neonates

    · Transport of patients requiring specialised emergency treatment in the UK.

    · Transport of Organ retrieval teams in Ireland

    · Transport of patients from the islands where the Coastguard is not available;

    · Transport of paediatric patients requiring immediate medical intervention.

    Ends

    http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos..._5942265_n.jpg

    Air Corps AW 139 lands in Snowy Baldonnel following a successful Air Ambulance Mission today.


    http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos..._5214180_n.jpg

    The Air Corps flight crew and HSE medical team of the Air Ambulance with AW 139 in background.
    "Attack your attic with a Steyr....as seen on the Late Late Show..."

    Comment


    • #3
      In the freezing fog now being experienced in some parts of the country would they be capable?

      Comment


      • #4
        Under what circumstances would the learjet and CASA be used in medical transfers? Who would be likely to allowed the use of same?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by apc View Post
          Under what circumstances would the learjet and CASA be used in medical transfers? Who would be likely to allowed the use of same?
          I would say mainly internationals, for example some would most likely be bring transplant patients to the UK (or further afield) / bringing organs to Ireland.

          It may also be to regional airports/islands.


          If they are needed, requested and available the AC will do their damnest to complete the mission!
          Last edited by DeV; 7 January 2010, 14:11.

          Comment


          • #6
            QUOTE=DeV;283270]If they are needed, requested and available the AC will do their damnest to complete the mission![/QUOTE]


            My god! I can hear that the music in my head!

            Last edited by Vickers; 7 January 2010, 17:07. Reason: Fix up video
            "Fellow-soldiers of the Irish Republican Army, I have just received a communication from Commandant Pearse calling on us to surrender and you will agree with me that this is the hardest task we have been called upon to perform during this eventful week, but we came into this fight for Irish Independence in obedience to the commands of our higher officers and now in obedience to their wishes we must surrender. I know you would, like myself, prefer to be with our comrades who have already fallen in the fight - we, too, should rather die in this glorious struggle than submit to the enemy." Volunteer Captain Patrick Holahan to 58 of his men at North Brunswick Street, the last group of the Four Courts Garrison to surrender, Sunday 30 April 1916.

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            • #7
              I would say mainly internationals, for example some would most likely be bring transplant patients to the UK (or further afield) / bringing organs to Ireland.

              It may also be to regional airports/islands.


              If they are needed, requested and available the AC will do their damnest to complete the mission!
              Didnt know that. The only person I ever heard of being transported on the Gov. jet for medical reasons was Brian Lenihan Snr.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by apc View Post
                Didnt know that. The only person I ever heard of being transported on the Gov. jet for medical reasons was Brian Lenihan Snr.
                I can recall a young Irish child being carried on same to London, for the purpose
                of a vital organ transplant in the Great Ormond Hospital a few years ago
                "Well, stone me! We've had cocaine, bribery and Arsenal scoring two goals at home. But just when you thought there were truly no surprises left in football, Vinnie Jones turns out to be an international player!" (Jimmy Greaves)!"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hospital Transfers have been almost routine taskings for rotary and fixed wing for as long as i can remmember! May have even been done by D.H.Dove before Alouettes arrived in 1963!
                  It was the snow storms of the early 60s that triggered the push for heli acquisition!

                  When this happened before in 1982, I was collected by Gazelle helicopter from a football field beside Northside Shopping Centre and flown to Baldonnel,.. roads impassable.
                  We flew snow relief operations for the next 8 to 10 days using 1x SA330 J Puma,2 x sa 342 Gazelles and possibly 6 SA 316B Alouettes.
                  We flew from first light till last light, firstly evacuating people trapped in remote farms and villages,then flying food in to those who could'nt leave their homes (including 1 and a half tons of food to Peamount Hospital by Puma) and then flying fodder to animals out on the hills!
                  Towards the end we flew isolated patients into Hospitals for dialysis,diabetic treatments and even a new born baby and mother from mid wicklow to St Vincents.

                  I was dropped home after 8 days,again by Gazelle!
                  Some of the most satisfying flying of my entire career!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Air ambulances by Air Corps fixed-wing aircraft has been going on since the days of the King Airs.Even the Cessnas have carried out human organ and medical team transfers.I was involved in two, in the Casa, 252, and one in 240, all to the UK. It's as routine an event as you can get, really and has nothing to do with the present weather conditions.
                    regards
                    GttC

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      That photo of the AW139 landing, is a real eye opener - those conditions are horrendous, but it's great to see they have the ability and are using it to positive effect.

                      As an aside, on met.ie right now it's -12 in Baldonnel.

                      They'll be needing more than silk scarves methinks

                      Keep up the good work

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Papa 242 View Post
                        Hospital Transfers have been almost routine taskings for rotary and fixed wing for as long as i can remmember! May have even been done by D.H.Dove before Alouettes arrived in 1963!
                        It was the snow storms of the early 60s that triggered the push for heli acquisition!

                        When this happened before in 1982, I was collected by Gazelle helicopter from a football field beside Northside Shopping Centre and flown to Baldonnel,.. roads impassable.
                        We flew snow relief operations for the next 8 to 10 days using 1x SA330 J Puma,2 x sa 342 Gazelles and possibly 6 SA 316B Alouettes.
                        We flew from first light till last light, firstly evacuating people trapped in remote farms and villages,then flying food in to those who could'nt leave their homes (including 1 and a half tons of food to Peamount Hospital by Puma) and then flying fodder to animals out on the hills!
                        Towards the end we flew isolated patients into Hospitals for dialysis,diabetic treatments and even a new born baby and mother from mid wicklow to St Vincents.

                        I was dropped home after 8 days,again by Gazelle!
                        Some of the most satisfying flying of my entire career!
                        Assuming you have children, I' d say they get a great buzz out of dropping
                        that story to their mates (not too many people get picked up by
                        heli to go to work, after all)

                        "Well, stone me! We've had cocaine, bribery and Arsenal scoring two goals at home. But just when you thought there were truly no surprises left in football, Vinnie Jones turns out to be an international player!" (Jimmy Greaves)!"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hi all,
                          The country is full of experts on severe weather operations.They're called Eastern Europeans and they are working in your local shop or petrol station or garage.Ask them how they cope and email the answers to John Gormless and our absent Minister for Transport.

                          As far as helis go, is 6 enough?

                          regards
                          GttC

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Back to Papa 242s post ..we had two gazelles a puma and eight Allouettes in 1982..that almost double the machines we have now.

                            Yes they are more capable but this is one where quantity wins over quality.. but in saying that we also have some rather capable coast guard machines this time about..I assume they are being utilised?
                            Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by GoneToTheCanner View Post
                              Hi all,
                              The country is full of experts on severe weather operations.They're called Eastern Europeans and they are working in your local shop or petrol station or garage.Ask them how they cope and email the answers to John Gormless and our absent Minister for Transport.

                              As far as helis go, is 6 enough?

                              regards
                              GttC

                              I heard the DF spokesperson say 6 earlier too.

                              There are eight - the two EC135's are pretty capable machines.

                              Add:

                              4/5 Coastguard

                              2 Garda (they could fulfill some helpful role presumably!)
                              Last edited by pym; 8 January 2010, 12:07.

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