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  • Fouga Magisters

    I seen on Facebook that Fouga 216 is on display on the square at the National Museum in Collins Barracks Dublin.

    Attached Files

  • #2
    Hope she's safe out there in the square

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    • #3
      Marks Models

      We are really spoiling you this month with another new item of Irish interest. This one is for Irish aviation enthusiasts and is the Heller Fouga Magister in 1/72 scale complete with a set of Irish Air Corps decals in 1/72. This model is exclusive to Marks Models and is available to purchase online now, should be in Hawkins St. and Dun Laoghaire tomorrow and Cork on Thursday.
      http://www.marksmodels.com/?pid=16832
      Photo: We are really spoiling you this month with another new item of Irish interest. This one is for Irish aviation enthusiasts and is the Heller Fouga Magister in 1/72 scale complete with a set of Irish Air Corps decals in 1/72. This model is exclusive to Marks Models and is available to purchase online now, should be in Hawkins St. and Dun Laoghaire tomorrow and Cork on Thursday. http://www.marksmodels.com/?pid=16832


      Extract from https://www.facebook.com/MarksModels

      I have a feeling that this is not the Irish Air Corps one, HTP, Tony Kearns, any idea?
      Last edited by Turkey; 11 June 2013, 22:32.
      "We will hold out until our last bullet is spent. Could do with some whiskey"
      Radio transmission, siege of Jadotville DR Congo. September 1961.
      Illegitimi non carborundum

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      • #4
        Originally posted by pym View Post
        Hope she's safe out there in the square
        Should be safe enough the 5Bn left Collins years ago

        Comment


        • #5
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSHkJi_jd1I A view of a fouga in flight that would have been nice to have done in Silver Swallow days.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Tempest View Post
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSHkJi_jd1I A view of a fouga in flight that would have been nice to have done in Silver Swallow days.
            Like these?
            https://www.google.ie/search?q=youtu...&client=safari

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            • #7
              have a feeling that this is not the Irish Air Corps one, HTP, Tony Kearns, any idea?
              Sorry had missed out on this.

              Hellers fouga is a bog standard version, the IAC ones were CM170 Super Magister. which were slightly uprated from the original. Outwardly theres not a whole lot of difference.

              Theres new 1/48th scale one due out this year, not the FM one, so I will be adding one to the collection at some point.
              Last edited by hptmurphy; 25 August 2013, 14:24.
              Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

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              • #8
                Originally posted by hptmurphy View Post
                Sorry had missed out on this.

                Hellers fouga is a bog standard version, the IAC ones were CM170 Zephyrs which were slightly uprated from the original. Outwardly theres not a whole lot of difference.

                Theres new 1/48th scale one due out this year, not the FM one, so I will be adding one to the collection at some point.
                The IAC Fougas were not Zephyrs, the Zephyr was designed for carrier operations and was used by the French Navy for training in this role.

                The IAC aircraft were Super-Magister's and had the Marbore VI engines and some other enhancements centered around the flight controls and the cockpit.

                I am not sure you could tell externally between a standard Fouga and a Super-Magister, the Zephyr was different as the canopy was openable in flight to aid with Vis for Carrier Landings.

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                • #9
                  Hello,
                  The Air Corps aircraft were CMi70 Magisters with the Marbore VI engines, they are often misqouted as Super Magisters for that reason. Let us hope that the Magister is not left for a protracted period in the open at Collins Bks..

                  Like homer, at the lateness of my reply last night, I too began to nod, it's an age thing really !
                  I should have referred to the book Fouga Magister an Irish Perspective by Joe Maxwell and Radu Brinzan. This is an excellent study, one of the finest aircraft publications dealing with an Air Corps aircraft type to hit the bookshelves.
                  Tony K
                  Last edited by Tony Kearns; 21 August 2013, 13:17.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Tony Kearns View Post
                    Hello,
                    The Air Corps aircraft were CMi70 Magisters with the Marbore VI engines, they are often misqouted as Super Magisters for that reason. Let us hope that the Magister is not left for a protracted period in the open at Collins Bks..

                    Like homer, at the lateness of my reply last night, I too began to nod, it's an age thing really !
                    I should have referred to the book Fouga Magister an Irish Perspective by Joe Maxwell and Radu Brinzan. This is an excellent study, one of the finest aircraft publications dealing with an Air Corps aircraft type to hit the bookshelves.
                    Tony K
                    You may well be right, but we certainly referred to them as super-magister's. The details are hazy but IIRC the aircraft were built for an African country which never took delivery of them, they then sat in storage for years, before they were refurbished and upgraded and sold to the IAC. The improvements over the the basic aircraft were not just the Marbore VI engine but the aircraft also had hydraulic aileron boost and artificial feel, I may be wrong but I don't think the basic aircraft had those features.

                    There doesn't appear to be a lot of detailed information around for those aircraft.

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                    • #11
                      No, seen all of those, I meant the positioning of the camera on the wing tip, would have produced great views in formation

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Charlie252 View Post
                        You may well be right, but we certainly referred to them as super-magister's. The details are hazy but IIRC the aircraft were built for an African country which never took delivery of them, they then sat in storage for years, before they were refurbished and upgraded and sold to the IAC. The improvements over the the basic aircraft were not just the Marbore VI engine but the aircraft also had hydraulic aileron boost and artificial feel, I may be wrong but I don't think the basic aircraft had those features.

                        There doesn't appear to be a lot of detailed information around for those aircraft.
                        The Irish Fouga's where the CM 170-2 Super Magisters. The CM 170-2 was an upgraded CM 170 Magister, replacing its Marbore II engines with the Marbore VI engines used by the CM 173 Super Magisters. Four of the Fouga's 215, 216, 217 and 218 where ex Austrian, 219 and 220 where originally sold to the Katanga forces in the Congo but where never handed over due to the UN arms embargo, as a result they where practically brand new. 221 was the missing Fouga, ex French and was used exclusively for ground training.

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                        • #13
                          The Air Corps aircraft were designated Fouga Magister CM170 and listed as such in the Log book. With the Marbore VI engine it does not change in this case the type designation as listed on its construction plate.
                          An earlier example was when the Air Corps operated the Seafire LFIII, these were Seafire aircraft extensively modified to Spitfire VC standard and always listed in Air Corps documents as Seafires. Some pilots actually listed them in their log books as Spitfires. Hence the confusion.

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                          • #14
                            Log File
                            Attached Files

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                            • #15
                              Rhodes has it right. They were modded up to -2 standard with the Marbore VI-F2 engines (1050 lbs of thrust, compared to 880 lbs with the II engines). They also had a basic Matra reflector gunsight, as opposed to the original gyro gunsight. They also recieved more modern avionics, courtesy of Aer Lingus workshops, when they came here. They did have the aileron boost and also had some ventilation/air conditioning changes. They could use the Belgian GPMG as well as the standard French AAT-52 machine-gun. With regard to 221, the alleged ground training Fouga, it was derelict and was off limits to apprentices, on pain of death, so it was never used as a practical ground trainer.

                              regards
                              GttC

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