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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    Where is it mounted?

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  • CTU
    replied
    YES , I saw that, and then while looking for more information, I found the actual press release from the manufacturer, which also happens to mention what system is being installed, which was not mentioned in the previous article from "Switzerland Global Enterprises"

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    Originally posted by CTU View Post
    Press release from Leica

    https://leica-geosystems.com/en-US/a...ip_with_airbus

    System to be installed on the C295s according to the Press release

    https://leica-geosystems.com/product...ica-chiroptera

    https://forum.irishmilitaryonline.co...237#post730237

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  • CTU
    replied
    Press release from Leica

    https://leica-geosystems.com/en-US/a...ip_with_airbus

    System to be installed on the C295s according to the Press release

    https://leica-geosystems.com/product...ica-chiroptera


    Leave a comment:


  • na grohmiti
    replied
    Originally posted by DeV View Post

    Gamechanging capability
    It may be if we have anyone capable of accurately analysing the data in Real time, and directing a surface response accordingly.

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  • DeV
    replied
    Originally posted by na grohmiti View Post
    Gamechanging capability

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    AIRBUS INSTALLS LEICA SENSORS

    Nov 25, 2021 09:35Michaela Mersetzky, St.GallenBodenseeArea/Café Europe

    Leica Geosystems has announced a partnership with Airbus. Two new aircraft from the Irish Air Corps for marine surveillance are receiving specially developed LiDAR sensors. They can detect and visualize small, submerged objects in real time.
    Two new aircraft from the Irish Air Corps for marine surveillance are receiving specially developed LiDAR sensors. Image provided by Leica
    Leica Geosystems will be collaborating with Airbus. The manufacturer of optical precision equipment based in the St.GallenBodenseeArea has developed LiDAR sensors for marine surveillance in accordance with Airbus’s requirements. According to a press release, they will initially be installed in two C295 MSAs belonging to the Irish Air Corps. The two marine surveillance aircraft are to be delivered in the second quarter of 2023.

    According to information from Leica, the “unique object detection feature” enables LiDAR data to be visualized and analyzed in real time during the flight. This type of three-dimensional laser scanning is also able to precisely locate and analyze small, submerged objects – “a process which previously could take up to several days”.

    Anders Ekelund, VP for Bathymetric LiDAR Sensors at Leica’s Swedish parent company, Hexagon, comments: “With this latest innovation, we are expanding our current system, adding significant capabilities for the maritime surveillance industry, and introducing new applications for airborne bathymetry.”

    Stephen Conolly, Captain of the Irish Air Corps, states: “The combined bathymetric and topographic LiDAR sensor will provide us with more details than ever before. Detecting objects close to real-time and having a clear picture of underwater activities will allow us to report directly to the Mission Support Centre on the ground and act faster to perform our duties more efficiently.”

    Airbus installs Leica sensors | S-GE

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  • Sparky42
    replied
    A bit of an update on the first new CASA:
    https://twitter.com/GOCAirCorps/stat...13104351252481

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  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    Originally posted by Graylion View Post

    Isn't any Airbus MRTT a combi aircraft? And I agree on tanker at the moment, but that may change if we ever get some QRA birds.
    the MRTT achieves it's flexibility by using most of the three holds for cargo as well as the normal cabin space for pax and not having to carry an internal tank for refuelling. It dispenses it's own fuel supply to the awaiting jets. That's why it's so efficient. The only downside is the need to have a pallet lifter and a catering lifter truck to load it.

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    Imagine being able to buy aircraft in double figures...

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  • spider
    replied
    May be of interest...

    https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/indi...c295-aircraft/

    Leave a comment:


  • Graylion
    replied
    Originally posted by DeV View Post
    unfortunately seems to keep coming back to lack of combi aircraft which would give us most utility.

    Only combi 767 as far as I can find is the KC-46 that is a tanker (questionable need), cargo and pax (only certified for 58).
    Isn't any Airbus MRTT a combi aircraft? And I agree on tanker at the moment, but that may change if we ever get some QRA birds.

    Leave a comment:


  • Anzac
    replied
    Originally posted by DeV View Post
    unfortunately seems to keep coming back to lack of combi aircraft which would give us most utility.

    Only combi 767 as far as I can find is the KC-46 that is a tanker (questionable need), cargo and pax (only certified for 58).
    DeV there is the Boeing 737-700 FC Flex-Combi conversion which has hit the market. With the 2nd aircraft been delivered this month.

    ​​​​​​https://www.freightwaves.com/news/th...-the-flexcombi

    There are three options: a 24-seat cabin with room for six pallet positions; a 12-seat cabin with a seven-pallet payload; and a full freighter mode with eight container positions. Pallets are loaded through an oversize cargo door. Loose cargo and baggage go in the lower hold, which is too small in narrow-body planes for containers. Like the previous 700C new build variant the C-40A one would expect it to be able to carry 121 pax on 463L RoRo palletised seating - probably just a little more STC work by PEMCO to do that.

    A 700 FC would look good in FS16515 Boeing Grey that they paint the P-8A's in. The odd 800ft lowish pass over fishing boats every once and a while might induce a bit of paranoia from the skippers.
    Last edited by Anzac; 15 September 2021, 13:02.

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  • DeV
    replied
    unfortunately seems to keep coming back to lack of combi aircraft which would give us most utility.

    Only combi 767 as far as I can find is the KC-46 that is a tanker (questionable need), cargo and pax (only certified for 58).

    Leave a comment:


  • Anzac
    replied
    Originally posted by Graylion View Post
    The good thing about Wiki these days is the links to source data.

    https://www.boeing.com/assets/pdf/co.../acaps/767.pdf

    From page 57. One can see that at sea level a B762ER with pax and fuel would have no problem getting in and out of Casement.
    Last edited by Anzac; 15 September 2021, 11:28.

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