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No Role for the Air Corps says Minister for Defence in SAR

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    Originally posted by apc View Post
    They would be better off making the fixed wing element part of the overall contract ensuring 24hr coverage and include medical transfers too. Let the Air Corps do what it does best
    Make do with what it has? Because that's been the air corps way since the Puma was handed back.

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  • apc
    replied
    They would be better off making the fixed wing element part of the overall contract ensuring 24hr coverage and include medical transfers too. Let the Air Corps do what it does best

    Leave a comment:


  • Sparky42
    replied
    Originally posted by DeV View Post

    So long as it resourced
    Yep, unless the CASAs (now and future) see substantially increased support, then talking about a dedicated fixed wing asset is taking the mick…

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  • DeV
    replied
    Originally posted by Jaque'ammer View Post
    Imo this is the best outcome. State keeps the assets it's paying for, Air Corps doesn't get swallowed up in the SAR role while also not being completely iced out.

    So long as it resourced

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  • Jaque'ammer
    replied
    Imo this is the best outcome. State keeps the assets it's paying for, Air Corps doesn't get swallowed up in the SAR role while also not being completely iced out.


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  • DeV
    replied
    https://www.gov.ie/en/campaigns/ed65...ation-project/

    Government Decision on new Coast Guard Aviation Service


    Government today (27 July 2021) agreed to commence the formal procurement process for a new Coast Guard aviation service in October next. The service is currently contracted to CHC Ireland and may be extended up to June 2025 at the latest. The decision was based on a detailed appraisal and business case prepared by KPMG for the Department of Transport, and was brought to Government by the Minister for Transport, Eamon Ryan, T.D.

    The business case brought to Government set out the strategic case for a new service, considered the range of options for how such a service could be delivered, including the potential for the Air Corps to provide an element of the service as a “hybrid” option alongside another civil operator. It also sets out an implementation plan to achieve the desired service. The detailed appraisal included a financial and economic appraisal of short-listed options, with an assessment of costs, benefits, affordability, deliverability, risks and sensitivities associated with the options. The approval of the business case is one of the key steps required in the Public Spending Code (PSC). Details of the procurement will be announced in October when the formal Pre-Qualification requirements for tendering will be published.

    Commenting on the decision, Minister for Transport, Eamon Ryan T.D. said: “After a lengthy deliberative process, I am glad we now have a decision to proceed to tender based on a business case which has considered all relevant aspects involved including its core SAR role but also the important secondary benefits to be derived from the service including supports to the island communities and the Health Service Executive. The report considered all the various options for how the service can be best delivered, the demand drivers and the changing technological and market environment in which this procurement will be set. This is a costly but vital service to the State and it is important that we optimise the benefits to be derived from it”.

    The Minister for Defence and Minister for Foreign Affairs Simon Coveney, T.D welcomed the decision and the fact that it provides for the possibility of the Air Corps providing a new fixed wing element as part of the Coast Guard’s overall aviation service: “My Department and the Air Corps, working in close consultation with the Irish Coast Guard over the next two and a half months, will look at how the Air Corps might provide a dedicated fixed wing element of the service which meets the requirements and parameters which are now clearly set out in the business case”.

    Minister of State Hildegarde Naughton T.D. also welcomed the decision and thanked those stakeholders across the SAR system and the relevant Departments and state entities who have informed the deliberations on this process to date. “The decision paves the way for the procurement of this vital element of our Search and Rescue system over a 10 year period. The timelines and procurement strategy agreed today will ensure a seamless transition from the existing contract with CHCI. It will also offer the potential to avail of developments in technology since the last contract was let in 2010 and to build on the experience and lessons learnt over the last 10 years.”

    She added: “The process of consultation and deliberation started over 18 months ago and has included extensive discussions with state and voluntary organisations involved and reliant to one degree or another on the Irish Coast Guard’s aviation service. Their views have helped to inform and shape the scope and nature of the new service which KPMG’s business case has appraised and costed”.

    The formal procurement documentation will describe the expectations and requirements for the pre-qualification stage of the procurement. This will be published by end October next when the formal procurement is launched.

    Based on the business case analysis, the new service is expected to benefit from some new elements including a dedicated fixed wing component to provide the IRCG with an on-call pollution monitoring, high endurance search and top cover capability. It also has the potential to allow a more innovative helicopter fleet. The helicopter element will include night vision capability from the outset. From a competitive perspective, the procurement will benefit from a more extensive range of potential helicopter solutions than would have been on the market in 2010.

    The current service already provides significant secondary services to the HSE and the National Ambulance Services and medical evacuation services to the island communities. The service scoped in the business case will continue to deliver these ancillary services and has the potential to deliver more supports to the HSE and additional fire-fighting capability to the Department of Housing / Fire Services. These aspects will be subject to further discussion with those services as the procurement strategy advances.

    The cost of the existing contract is in the region of €60m a year. The analysis concludes that the estimated costs for a new service could be similar although the precise costings set out in the business case are premised on a number of different assumptions and based on a different model to the current one. The costings are confidential and commercially sensitive. The actual cost will only be known once the tenders have been received, evaluated and Government awards the tender – expected to be in March 2023.

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    Originally posted by CTU View Post
    I take it this "occurance" will result in an AAIU (Incident/Serious Incident) investigation.

    http://www.aaiu.ie/about-us/aaiu-res...n-of-occurence
    It will, but how long before the report is released? How long more will they sit on the R119 report?

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  • CTU
    replied
    I take it this "occurance" will result in an AAIU (Incident/Serious Incident) investigation.

    http://www.aaiu.ie/about-us/aaiu-res...n-of-occurence

    Leave a comment:


  • DeV
    replied
    Originally posted by apc View Post
    " Meanwhile, the Air Corps was alerted. Crews were called in and an AW139 helicopter and a Casa Maritime patrol aircraft were put on standby in Casement Aerodrome in case the Coast Guard helicopter had to ditch in the sea. "

    In that scenario how long would it have taken to get the AW139 and the CASA ready to get airborne from the time the Air Corp were alerted
    OPSEC as there could be other occasions when they have to

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  • apc
    replied
    " Meanwhile, the Air Corps was alerted. Crews were called in and an AW139 helicopter and a Casa Maritime patrol aircraft were put on standby in Casement Aerodrome in case the Coast Guard helicopter had to ditch in the sea. "

    In that scenario how long would it have taken to get the AW139 and the CASA ready to get airborne from the time the Air Corp were alerted

    Leave a comment:


  • DeV
    replied
    https://www.irishtimes.com/news/irel...mpression=true

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  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    It's like the decision to close the Shannon cabin crew (and others!) base in the case of Aer Lingus. This has long been in the pipeline but nobody was allowed to say so , out loud. While EI may have an emotional attachment to Shannon, IAG doesn't and couldnt care less if they close the place. IAG is dominated by BA and a few job losses in Shannon won't cost them a thought. A lot of the staff would be quite happy to get a decent package and leave EI tomorrow. There will be the usual moan about job losses and SIPTU (or whatever they call themselves now) will make some token noise but it will be yesterday's news soon enough. Job losses/hiring in Shannon Airport are not uncommon as things in aviation shift and change all the time and the imminent collapse of the Western Seaboard,as predicted in yesterday's media, will be put off for another day.

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  • DeV
    replied
    Just saying
    https://www.military.ie/en/careers/re-join/

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  • trellheim
    replied
    Why is the SAR contract now a jobs program?
    yes I'm missing what the point is of all this as well

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  • Rocinante
    replied
    Why is the SAR contract now a jobs program?

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