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The A3's usefulness

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  • lordinajamjar
    replied
    The A3 kinda reminds me of an axe that's been in my familly for many generations.

    The family claim it was originally used at the battle of Clontarf. No paperwork to prove that though. It's been used extensively over the course of hundreds of years. You can see the wear and tear alright. I'm proud of the old axe. The handle had to be replaced at least 21 times but the axe head was only replaced twice.

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  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    Hi Turkey
    It wasn't just slightly bent...it was REALLY bent. You could have taken it home in a wheelbarrow. No point in doing it by halves,eh?
    regards
    GttC

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  • Turkey
    replied
    Originally posted by Vmax
    (1 X written off due to skid damage!!!!!!).
    Not to mention the tail boom broken along with the tail rotor drive, the windscreen, the engin mounts, the instrument panel, the main rotor, ......ect .....ect

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  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    Hi Dev
    The reality of the Alouettes is that all of them have been rebuilt down to the last nut and bolt at least five times over.There's probably not a part on any of them that's more than 5-6 yrs old. Certainly, there is nothing original left on any of them.They have all suffered accidents that would have had other Air Forces striking them off charge, but the Air Corps relinquishes airframes like a Cavanman lets go a euro, so they were rebuilt time after time. They are maintenance-intensive by comparison to modern helicopters but you're not talking like with like.Either way, they'd be snapped up if they ever get released to the civvie market.
    regards
    GttC

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  • DeV
    replied
    In fairness the A3 has proven itself to be very useful, despite being 42 years old, by rights if you look at the average life span of a helicopter in most countries air arms you will find that they should have crashed years ago (please god they don't!). No one can denigh they were an excellent buy, Eddie Hobbs would have a hard time trying to match it.

    It speaks volumes for AC pilots and technical staff.

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  • DeV
    replied
    Originally posted by GoneToTheCanner
    how capable are the new helis? Don't recite the manufacturers figures because they are 9/10s bullshit on a good day.
    According to An Cosantoir a A139 can carry a 105mm unslung, the crew and ammo (but don't know how much/what range etc).

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  • FMolloy
    replied
    I reckon they'll use the A3's right up to the end of their useful lives.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by apod
    Dont know where you heard that Goldie but if you look in the july an cosantoir there is an article that contradicts what you just said.The maintenance versus operational ratio on the a3 is getting too big and that is why the ec135 is replacing BOTH the a3 AND the gazelle.

    Smithy was that the old special assault group that you are talking about?Very little is known about them.All i know is that they were speciaaly trained troops in each command as a stopgap before the foundation of the arw? Is this correct?
    The 2 X EC-135's primary role will be pilot training replacing the 2 x gazelles as we know (1 X written off due to skid damage!!!!!!).The minimum required for training is one,they seem to manage quite well with one gazelle at this task, so the remaining one could be used for similar tasks as the A3 but not capable of replacing the fleet.The A3 is a simple aircraft to maintain and relatively inexpensive to run, its over engineered and the engine is bullet proof.As long as there are parts availible why not continue to use them. I just cannot remember off hand how many helicopter pilots the aer corp have, but if they are limited to flying six heli's it looks to me that you might have some pi@*#d off people doing more desk duties than flying.

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  • Smithy
    replied
    Originally posted by Apod
    Smithy was that the old special assault group that you are talking about?Very little is known about them.All i know is that they were speciaaly trained troops in each command as a stopgap before the foundation of the arw? Is this correct?
    No it was a heli-borne platoon as Army reserve. Known as "Oakleaf Platoon". Didn't have any special training except for heli insertion and extraction drills.
    ________
    NEW JERSEY MEDICAL MARIJUANA DISPENSARIES
    Last edited by Smithy; 9 March 2011, 13:57.

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  • apod
    replied
    Dont know where you heard that Goldie but if you look in the july an cosantoir there is an article that contradicts what you just said.The maintenance versus operational ratio on the a3 is getting too big and that is why the ec135 is replacing BOTH the a3 AND the gazelle.

    Smithy was that the old special assault group that you are talking about?Very little is known about them.All i know is that they were speciaaly trained troops in each command as a stopgap before the foundation of the arw? Is this correct?
    Last edited by FMolloy; 4 September 2005, 15:07.

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  • Smithy
    replied
    Back in the 1970s. pre Rangers, there was a heli-borne platoon in the 3rd Bn (The Bloods), in the Curragh. They were involved in many operations and searches etc., such as the search for Dr. Herrema in the Slieve Blooms in about 1975. Others that spring to mind were searches of offshore islands, security for De Valera's funeral, Bodenstown, Portlaoise Prison. There was lots happening at the time. The A3s carried sticks of 4 and usually deployed up to 4 helis, depending on availability and op requirements. Fast roping was practiced but usually the sticks jumped from a low (very) hover or landing.
    ________
    Rugger
    Last edited by Smithy; 9 March 2011, 13:57.

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  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    Hi all
    Didn't a 120 mortar get dropped from a height once, from the cargo sling of an Alouette, in front of a bunch of senior officers? Bet that was fun to watch.I'll bet the amount of paper filled out thereafter equalled the weight of a loaded Alouette. Apod has a good point: how capable are the new helis? Don't recite the manufacturers figures because they are 9/10s bullshit on a good day. Will they be able to put down a fully-tooled section of infantrymen or an 81mm crew and their tube and bombs? Anyhow, the Alouettes don't owe us a penny and have served with distinction and will be missed.
    regards
    GttC

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  • Turkey
    replied
    Back about 1985 the five Dauphins were supposed to replace the 8 A111's in the Air Corps........
    Perhaps in about 10 years when parts supply hit rock bottem, the A111's may be replaced by a simple clear weather slick, assuming anyone is makin such a beast...........

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  • Goldie fish
    replied
    Its not negativity. Plan is,from what I hear, is that AB139 will "replace" the Dauphins, as far as Utility goes at least,and the EC135 will replace the Gazelle in the Pilot training role, while allowing a redundant capability for Air ambulance,and VIP transport. The A3 will soldier on for many more years in the Light utility role as they are "cheap and cheerful" as far as maintenance and reliability, and a little more user friendly in the hands of the ham fisted.

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  • apod
    replied
    jeez,dont you just hate negativity!

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