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  • Silver
    replied
    Originally posted by DeV
    The PwC report recommended that the number of barracks be reduced ... that has been done, and whether the Minister, or anyone else, likes it or not it makes sense for PDF barracks to be reduced further.

    It was proposed that the transport fleet be drastically upgraded and MLHs be purchased in order to make the DF more deployable at home, while making up for closed barracks.
    My point exactly!

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  • adwmaher
    replied
    would having this capability affect ability to carry usual number of troops ,equipment etc. BTW spot the non-soldier amongst you!

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  • FMolloy
    replied
    I doubt very much that the AC will put weapons other than door guns on the new helis.

    I'd get used to the acronyms, militaries world-wide are very fond of them.

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  • adwmaher
    replied
    Thanks for the clarification re: MATS. Recently visited the Bell-Augusta site. Saw picture of military version of 139. It had pylons for ground attack rockets. Any chance ours will have this capability also?

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  • Gunner Who?
    replied
    Bingo. right on the mark Dev.

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  • DeV
    replied
    The PwC report recommended that the number of barracks be reduced ... that has been done, and whether the Minister, or anyone else, likes it or not it makes sense for PDF barracks to be reduced further.

    It was proposed that the transport fleet be drastically upgraded and MLHs be purchased in order to make the DF more deployable at home, while making up for closed barracks.

    Leave a comment:


  • hptmurphy
    replied
    Collective in one hand stick in the other ...how simple can it be..I think its time that some of the higher ups just fell on their own swords rather than sending the other guy out to do it for them.

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  • Goldie fish
    replied
    12-14 helic capable of carrying a section each,plus gear would indeed be nice. Without SAR, is there still a need for MLH?

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  • Turkey
    replied
    Originally posted by Silver
    I suspect (hope!) the plan is to purchase a total of six 139's, followed by 4 x medium lift helis within 3-5 years.
    It would probaly make a lot more sense to just buy the first 6 and then add another 6-8 AB139's in future years, and stay out of the Medium lift helicopter busness altogether.

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  • Goldie fish
    replied
    The way I see it, the helicopter force is being rebuilt from the beginning,ignoring all experience gained from the Dauphin,or rather learning from th emistakes made and rethinking how the aircraft are used.
    In the past all rotary wing assets were there to provide SAR,or to support same. Military transport was a secondary task,which was largely impractical due to the SAR commitment.
    So we are starting again,with the 2 EC135s,which are small enough to be suitable for training,but big enough to be available for air ambulance or MATS.
    The 4 AB139s can then be retained for Military transport,training in troop transport and working with underslung loads. The intention has clearly been to not deploy them overseas, keeping them at home to allow troops training for overseas rotation to train in helicopter operations. This was an area that was largely neglected until East Timor,when things had to be learnt fast.
    Using them for SAR should only be something for dire emergencies.
    If the AB 139 proves successful,and I hope it does then maybe the option for another 2 can be exercised,and in time,maybe this aircraft will become the backbone of the rotary wing fleet in the same way as the ageing alouettes have been for the last 40 years. Remember we started with 3 Alouettes.

    Perhaps then when the pilots have regained the skills necessary for 24 hour all weather flying,which were more or less lost as the Dauphin became obsolete and ineffective,they can consider the need for a number of larger types,if for nothing else,to get the many overseas rotations used to operating with a larger type.

    Its often been said here,you cannot go from basic trainer to fast fighter jet in one step,and its expensive to have interim aircraft purely for training purposes. The future rotary wing fleet will provide the lower end of the Heli ability,capable of being used for initial training,while still retaining practical usefulness.
    Given the chance that it could be another 20 years before the Government decide to throw money at the Air Corps,I think the new arrangements would be much better than having,as what was to have been the case if the MLH had gone through, €100m split between 4 massive aircraft that nobody is trained to fly,because the only aircraft capable of training pilots became too old to operate safely,and the Department couldnt afford to replace them.

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  • Silver
    replied
    I suspect (hope!) the plan is to purchase a total of six 139's, followed by 4 x medium lift helis within 3-5 years.

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  • DeV
    replied
    Originally posted by JAG
    Question- what would the helicopter requirement be if the DF were to be in a position to transport a light infantry battalion and (just for shits & giggles) including vehicles to any point on this island.
    A LOT of helicopters ... Puma HC.1 (in service with RAF since 1971) which carries up to 16 fully equipped troops (20 in CEFO) requires 34 lifts to move a infantry battalion of around 625 troops. Thats 2 SERVICABLE Pumas requiring 16 return journies.

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  • hptmurphy
    replied
    GTC puts the whole thing in perspective!

    BTW the USCG have just signed a comtract for another re enging package of the HH65 Dolphin fleet.

    These were bought at the same time as ours but in greaters number swith far less shiny kit...and they are still going strong.
    We on the other hand by the shiniet toy on the shelf in minimal batches work the shit out of it an expect it to last indefinetly....and bitch like hell when it dosent' and fail to remember how we ended up with it in the first place.

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  • Goldie fish
    replied
    The Navy Lynx and the super Puma. Lynx for P30 class and Puma for troop transport/SAR. In 1983 the industry was pretty confident that Ireland would be ordering 2 super Pumas, as the single Puma had impressed many(except the bean counters). As often mentioned before,Eithnes hangar was designed for a Navy Lynx. Promotional drawing at the time show a far smaller P30 class with a lynx on the helideck.

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  • Steamy Window
    replied
    what other aircraft were being selected at the same time as the Dauphin?

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