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AAR on personal equip/arms from Iraq

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    Come-quickly
    Commandant

  • Come-quickly
    replied
    I hate to drag up the obvious but the FN MAG/M240B is extremely accurate on single shot, in fact the scatter effect in only takes effect after 3-5 rounds.
    I don't want to be too armchair generalish but it seems like a pretty obvious choice of weapon.

    Leave a comment:

  • ex pat 007
    airborne daddy

  • ex pat 007
    replied
    CT , Im in an airborne infantry unit (2nd bct 82nd) our logistical and resupply issues are huge, as we dont have as large an organic s and t outfits mech and armor do.We have one truck and one gator in our company, while bttn s and t co have assets everyone screams for them.Ammo conservation and marksmanship is a large big deal.

    When one or two hostiles appear at 500 mtrs or so shooting h and i type fires (with aks) the bestresponse (I think) is to shoot one or perhaps both(yeah both) with aimed fire, 240s and the like should be used against groups of 5 or more.

    Strap hangers from say bttn S-2 , branch infantry awarded CIB but didnt feel they earned it , getting in the way of the fight.One west point professor(alsoo branch infantry) getting assigned tdy to 3rd ID so his da photo looks better with CIB

    Leave a comment:

  • Come-quickly
    Commandant

  • Come-quickly
    replied
    Bayonets were often used in the Falklands and inflicted numerous casualties, the bayonet like the Infantry officers/Pistol is basically a weapon of last resort, its a much more expedient weapon in close quarters than say beating someone with your limbs or having to draw a secondary weapon.
    Always prepare for the worst in combat, ie assume that the enemy is skillful and relatively well supplied until you can make an eyes on assesment of the situation.
    A magazine weighs more than a bayonet and can't be used without reloading the weapon.

    Leave a comment:

  • yellowjacket
    Potential Liability

  • yellowjacket
    replied
    I'd be fairly sure noone "intends" to run out of ammo, especially at close quarters.

    If you get into close quarters and run out of ammo will a bayonet do you any good? Maybe instead of a bayonet you should carry a few extra rounds

    Bayonet is used more as a general knife/tin opener than a weapon now seemingly, and it's role has been mostly psychological for many years.

    Leave a comment:

  • Come-quickly
    Commandant

  • Come-quickly
    replied
    Multi-Tool: Unanimously positive comments about the Gerber multi-tool (leatherman) provided with the rapid fielding initiative. The multi-tool may be the new bayonet. Very few soldiers carried a bayonet unless required to by unit SOP.
    Does this mean that US soldiers never intend on getting into close quarters and running out of ammo again?

    Leave a comment:

  • California Tanker
    My tank is bigger...

  • California Tanker
    replied
    o lack of ability to effectively engage targets past 300 mtrs with rifle
    fire


    Given that that's deemed to be pretty much the effective range of most rifles, what's the issue? Ranges longer than that, you should have time to either maneuver to suit, or deploy longer-ranged-weapons. (M240s, Mk-19s, mortars...)

    o volumes of return fire excessive, tighter reign by junior leaders on
    their men is necessary, ammo resupply can be a problem


    A factor of training. Any time I've been under evaluation, the evaluators keep telling us to fire more, more frequently. Combine this with the fact that half the time we're yelling 'bang' due to a lack of actual ammo, and there's less 'muscle memory'

    o "strap hangers" pogues with no buisness nearthe fighting trying to
    "earn" CIBs

    I thought you needed to be an 11B assigned to a combat unit to be awarded one anyway, no? Or am I thinking Combat Medic again?

    NTM

    Leave a comment:

  • ex pat 007
    airborne daddy

  • ex pat 007
    replied
    having returned two days ago from the theatre some of the problems I saw during combat operations were;
    o lack of ability to effectively engage targets past 300 mtrs with rifle
    fire, 7.62 mm rifles atthe squad/section level needed along with a
    "squad marksman" training program.

    o volumes of return fire excessive, tighter reign by junior leaders on
    their men is necessary, ammo resupply can be a problem

    o casualty evac plans,standard and non standard ,nothing crushes
    morale like waiting for a dust off that is overdue for a wounded
    comrade

    o 60mm mortars need more time on direct lay training in garrison

    o "strap hangers" pogues with no buisness nearthe fighting trying to
    "earn" CIBs

    o Assault packs are just pure crap, a rucksack with no frame by some
    gucci kit Co (blackhawk) are still rucks with no frame.

    Leave a comment:

  • yellowjacket
    Potential Liability

  • yellowjacket
    replied
    www.vnh.org

    Leave a comment:

  • Guest
    Guest

  • spiderman
    Guest replied
    hey sledger, pretty impressive stuff!!
    i'd be interested in ballistics links if you had them handy.
    have you seen the US medical corps site that deals with wound types and surgical treatment? (cant remember where it is)

    i'm also looking for battlefield first aid info

    Leave a comment:


  • sledger
    replied
    M4 may be fine for CQB but new ammo is needed if it is to replace the M16 at other ranges. There have been several reports from troops in Afghanistan regarding the lack of lethality of the SS109/M855 cartridge, particularly when it is fired from an M4 (US) or M8 (Canadian) carbine. This was also observed in Somalia. For the SS109/M855 to achieve lethality, it must be moving at a velocity of over 732m/s when it strikes its target. At this velocity and above, the bullet penetrates a short distance and then begins to yaw as its spinning slows and it tends to return to its normal stable state, which is base forward. As the bullet yaws, it comes apart at the cannelure, scattering fragments and causing a relatively large wound channel. In practical terms, this translates to approximately 200m with a bullet fired from an M16 or similar rifle with a 558mm barrel at approximately 914m/s.

    When fired from a carbine, however, the SS109/M855 bullet leaves the barrel with a velocity of only about 790m/s. Therefore by the time it has traveled downrange only 50m it has already dropped below the velocity threshold for enhanced wound ballistics. The net effect is that troops equipped with M4 or M8 carbines are using weapons that are only marginally more effective ballistically than a 0.22 Magnum at anything other than close-quarters battle distances.

    The lack of wounding efficacy has caused some military elements to begin exploring the possibility of adopting a 5.56 x45mm cartridge with an improved bullet or even a different caliber altogether with improved wound ballistics. Most of these efforts, now only in the earliest stages, have experimented with heavier bullets. For example, US special operations forces in Afghanistan now employ a match cartridge manufactured by US company Black Hills Ammunition that fires a 5g bullet at 792m/s in the M4 Carbine. This cartridge has proven to have improved terminal ballistics over the SS109/M855. Other experiments have been conducted with bullets weighing as much as 6.5g.

    Leave a comment:

  • FCA Trooper
    Banned User

  • FCA Trooper
    replied
    you dont have to be an NCO to fire the BAP,3 stars have trained on them and fired them in the infantry

    Leave a comment:

  • yooklid
    6-40509-04014-7

  • yooklid
    replied
    I never knew that.

    Leave a comment:

  • California Tanker
    My tank is bigger...

  • California Tanker
    replied
    Cav troopers are given BAP training at least. Don't know about the MPs.

    Yoolkid: The use of Glasers (or any deforming/frangible ammunition) is prohibited by the Hague Conventions on Warfare.

    This is why 'ball' ammunition is Full Metal Jacket.

    NTM

    Leave a comment:

  • yellowjacket
    Potential Liability

  • yellowjacket
    replied
    Up to relatively recently, the accepted punishment for using expanding ammunition "dum-dums" in combat was summary execution.

    This is no longer the case, and offenders are supposed to be tried for war crimes.

    Leave a comment:

  • yooklid
    6-40509-04014-7

  • yooklid
    replied
    Where the hell did that come from?

    Leave a comment:

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