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2 Irish Troops injured in the Leb

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    BANDIT
    Banned User

  • BANDIT
    replied
    Nice of UN to identify vehicles with big UN letters , surprise there was not a flag as well , all part of UNDSS Moss compliance etc .. although not sure MOSS applies to military.. in some area I have worked .. I was supposed to comply with some of these regs, instead used to hire a battered cortina cruiser or such like with local driver and drive 100m +++behind big UN lettered convoys ...s
    perhaps a less visible by UN may be more effective than more armour etc

    Leave a comment:

  • Groundhog
    Chief of the Diet Tribe

  • Groundhog
    replied
    Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
    Anyone see the article in the Oirish Mail today suggesting that the fitting of electronic jammers could have prevented this attack?
    Has the Oirish Mail heard of victim activated and command wire devices.

    Originally posted by paul View Post
    No, but not driving on that road would of prevented that attack also
    Not deploying troops overseas would have the same effect.
    Groundhog
    Chief of the Diet Tribe
    Last edited by Groundhog; 13 January 2008, 22:29.

    Leave a comment:

  • paul
    Sargent Major

  • paul
    replied
    Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
    Anyone see the article in the Oirish Mail today suggesting that the fitting of electronic jammers could have prevented this attack?

    No, but not driving on that road would of prevented that attack also

    Leave a comment:

  • Goldie fish
    Tim Horgan

  • Goldie fish
    replied
    Anyone see the article in the Oirish Mail today suggesting that the fitting of electronic jammers could have prevented this attack?

    Leave a comment:

  • easyrider
    Commandant

  • easyrider
    replied
    But stil no sign of an LTAV for the lads going to Chad.....

    Leave a comment:


  • Exo1
    replied
    Originally posted by Connaught Stranger View Post
    No Timoneys ever served in Lebanon, or any other Irish UN Mission, the nearest any of them got to serving in combat was more than likely a spin along the Border areas.

    Corporal Ward, If I remember correctly took a round from the rear or side as the SISU hatch opened forwards providing protection only to the immediate front.

    In 1989 the U.N. supplied the Irish U.N.I.F.I.L. Battalion with 10 Finnish built SISU XA-180 APC's as replacements for the obsolete Panard M3 these vehicles had an open mounted 12.7mm Polish made NSV HMG, later replaced by a Browning QCB HMG, the gunner being totally exposed.

    During 1993/1994 ex-Panhard M3 Creusot-Loire TL.2.1.80 turrets were mounted on each SISU instead, mounting the twin 7.62mm GPMGs.


    In the book IRISH ARMY VEHICLES by Karl Martin page75 shows Two U.N.I.F.I.L. RG-32 Nyala Ambulances, and a picture of a U.N.I.F.I.L. RG-31 A.P.C with the front right wheel blown off by landmine the crew escaped unharmed.

    Connaught Stranger
    Ah right, thanks Connaught & HH for the info, I remember the story in Training and obviously got the "Peotic Version" of events... well it really ticks me off when we loose one of our own.... our record has being very good overall.. lets hope the high level of professionalism overseas keeps it that way!!....

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  • Connaught Stranger
    Lt Colonel

  • Connaught Stranger
    replied
    Don't think the Timoneys ever made it further than the Glen. But Cpl Peter Ward was shot dead in the front hatch of a Sisu near Al Journ. The good news is the drivers windshield stopped two rounds.
    No Timoneys ever served in Lebanon, or any other Irish UN Mission, the nearest any of them got to serving in combat was more than likely a spin along the Border areas.

    Corporal Ward, If I remember correctly took a round from the rear or side as the SISU hatch opened forwards providing protection only to the immediate front.

    In 1989 the U.N. supplied the Irish U.N.I.F.I.L. Battalion with 10 Finnish built SISU XA-180 APC's as replacements for the obsolete Panard M3 these vehicles had an open mounted 12.7mm Polish made NSV HMG, later replaced by a Browning QCB HMG, the gunner being totally exposed.

    During 1993/1994 ex-Panhard M3 Creusot-Loire TL.2.1.80 turrets were mounted on each SISU instead, mounting the twin 7.62mm GPMGs.


    In the book IRISH ARMY VEHICLES by Karl Martin page75 shows Two U.N.I.F.I.L. RG-32 Nyala Ambulances, and a picture of a U.N.I.F.I.L. RG-31 A.P.C with the front right wheel blown off by landmine the crew escaped unharmed.

    Connaught Stranger

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  • paul
    Sargent Major

  • paul
    replied
    good to hear there ok

    Leave a comment:


  • DeV
    replied
    DF Press Releases:

    http://www.military.ie/dfhq/pubrel/n.../news08jan.htm
    http://www.military.ie/dfhq/pubrel/n.../news09jan.htm
    http://www.military.ie/dfhq/pubrel/n...news09janb.htm

    Both have been released from hospital and will return to duty in the coming days.

    Leave a comment:


  • Exo1
    replied
    Originally posted by Groundhog View Post
    I remember a pic in an Cosantoir of a Finnbatt Sisu that lost a wheel to a mine. However I saw a M113 flipped over on it's back by a mine so maybe the Finns were lucky.



    Don't think the Timoneys ever made it further than the Glen. But Cpl Peter Ward was shot dead in the front hatch of a Sisu near Al Journ. The good news is the drivers windshield stopped two rounds.

    Ah right, that was a capibility of the Sisu that they could repel an Anti Tank mine.. well thats what we were told anyway.. suppose it was what we wanted to hear...:redface:


    Remember the Cav officer was out to investigate? I thought it was a Timoney... which lead to the heavier Sisu making it onto the scene in Irishbatt area....:confused:

    Leave a comment:

  • Goldie fish
    Tim Horgan

  • Goldie fish
    replied

    One things the South africans do well(as well as winning Rugby World cups) is build mine protected armoured vehicles. This comes from their long experience in Namibia and Angola. I notice the Italians are using the LMV out there also. Wasn't the crew of a Spanish Pandur also killed/wounded in Lebanon recently too?

    Leave a comment:

  • Craghopper
    Custom User Title

  • Craghopper
    replied
    Originally posted by hedgehog View Post
    lads who ddint serve there during my time will jump on a band(WOG)wagon

    which will no doubt take this thread away from the serious news

    that 2 Irish Soldiers were injured in the Lebanon
    No pun intended I hear you say..lol

    Originally posted by hedgehog View Post
    Were tehy not called TFM's

    what ever that means- as far as I remember they were kept by the BMR

    and they could only be criven by Cav lads (a lot of almaza has passed under teh bridge so forgive the memory)

    the reason from what I can remember is that they were so heavy etc

    but the Irish Military Police had the use of 2 of them in Butmir in Sarajevo

    and anyone could drive them
    They are called TFMs and Correct the BMR did use them....I'll have a look I'm sure I have a pic of them some where.

    Leave a comment:

  • Groundhog
    Chief of the Diet Tribe

  • Groundhog
    replied
    Originally posted by Exo1 View Post
    Ah right, fair enough.. lol.. However, I heard back in the mid 90s the Sisus took any tank mines and only lost the wheels, the hull was never penetrated.. awesome!!...
    I remember a pic in an Cosantoir of a Finnbatt Sisu that lost a wheel to a mine. However I saw a M113 flipped over on it's back by a mine so maybe the Finns were lucky.

    Originally posted by Exo1 View Post
    They were introduced is memory serves after a timoney light APC was pierced by 7.62mm rounds and we lost the gunner of the timoney...
    Don't think the Timoneys ever made it further than the Glen. But Cpl Peter Ward was shot dead in the front hatch of a Sisu near Al Journ. The good news is the drivers windshield stopped two rounds.

    Leave a comment:


  • hedgehog
    replied
    Were tehy not called TFM's

    what ever that means- as far as I remember they were kept by the BMR

    and they could only be criven by Cav lads (a lot of almaza has passed under teh bridge so forgive the memory)

    the reason from what I can remember is that they were so heavy etc

    but the Irish Military Police had the use of 2 of them in Butmir in Sarajevo

    and anyone could drive them

    Leave a comment:

  • X-RayOne
    Lieutenant

  • X-RayOne
    replied
    ah yes the wog wagons....great old yokes but useless against anything bigger than a bluebottle hitting the windscreen!!!

    i remember seeing the south african things over there too. for some reason the irish wouldn't use them. the story was the CofG was too high so the DF were afraid of injuries if they toppled over or rolled??!!! true or not, this story got plenty of legs on the trip.

    never let the truth get in the way of a good rumour!!

    Leave a comment:

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