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A Positive Mental Attitude.

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  • Exo1
    replied
    Originally posted by California Tanker View Post
    Other than keeping an eye out for potential threats? Besides, he called it quits when the preparations to move were still being carried out.



    Yes. Note "When they reached their destination"



    Difference between a tactical movement and an admin movement.



    Trust me, this was deliberate.

    NTM
    Right on!!.. That SOB got off lucky enough.... how can confidence be built when you have weak links like that in a unit especially if ye get deployment orders... that dickwad is lucky to still be working....

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  • luchi
    replied
    TRy this link????

    http://www.lair2000.net/Pooh_Lyrics4..._Altitude.html

    Sorry I can't upload the mp3
    Last edited by luchi; 18 February 2008, 00:06.

    Leave a comment:


  • California Tanker
    replied
    Originally posted by spudula View Post
    Did the individual have any duties to perfom along the route the convoy took that meant he couldnt doze off? If not then whats wrong with catching 40 winks in the back of, as u say yourself, " a freezing humve?
    Other than keeping an eye out for potential threats? Besides, he called it quits when the preparations to move were still being carried out.

    Was it not the intention of the convoy to stop and get some sleep when they reached their destination anyway??
    Yes. Note "When they reached their destination"

    Ive been on plenty of long convoys (dublin to cork or tralee is particularly tiresome) were ive crawled into a sleeping bag, formed a wall of bags around myself and gone comatose for a few hours. nothing wrong with that.
    Difference between a tactical movement and an admin movement.

    A for the not hearing anyone looking for them, i reckon theres more then one possibility for that.
    Trust me, this was deliberate.

    NTM

    Leave a comment:


  • spudula
    replied
    hehehe.......... nice one.

    ever hear the saying "sleep when you can"???

    Did the individual have any duties to perfom along the route the convoy took that meant he couldnt doze off? If not then whats wrong with catching 40 winks in the back of, as u say yourself, " a freezing humve?

    Was it not the intention of the convoy to stop and get some sleep when they reached their destination anyway??

    Ive been on plenty of long convoys (dublin to cork or tralee is particularly tiresome) were ive crawled into a sleeping bag, formed a wall of bags around myself and gone comatose for a few hours. nothing wrong with that.

    A for the not hearing anyone looking for them, i reckon theres more then one possibility for that.

    Leave a comment:


  • rod and serpent
    replied
    What a Jack Bastard

    Leave a comment:


  • Exo1
    replied
    Originally posted by California Tanker View Post
    Had a rather long weekend.

    Hopped on the bus to Irwin Friday evening, we got there at about 3am. The advance party had done relatively well, all the vehicles were lined up, all we needed to do was sign for our individual weapons and ammo.

    We also picked up a few attachments from other units who were assigned to us. One of these attachments was a medic, E-4 type. He got assigned to one of the recon platoons, and was told he was riding in a Hummer.

    He took objection to this. Irwin Hummers are kindof short on creature comforts such as 'roof' or 'door', and given the weather in winter, it's not the cosiest of rides. He'd prefer the M113 ambulance, please.

    Well, no. He's going with the platoon. So he gripes a bit, throws his gear in the back of the truck, complaining.

    About 0330, it's time for the platoon to move out, but they can't find the medic. After a few minutes, we dispatch the platoon anyway, we'll just bring him along with the main body.

    Eventually, however, we figure out that we can't find him in the main body either. This becomes an issue. We can't leave with a man missing. Cue a large search of the immediate area, including in or under various vehicles. We realise that nobody has seen him since he threw his gear in the truck in a huff. At this point, we're starting to think that it's not simple a case of 'we can't find him', but of 'he doesn't want to be found'. We continue looking, as time ticks on. Note that we have a full day's training ahead of us, the idea was to drive out, get to where we were going, catch a nap, and then start training. The longer we wait, the less sleep we're going to get.

    All work stops. We get everyone out of the vehicles and in one place. He's not around. We call up to the platoon which left some time ago, they all get our of their vehicles and stand in one place. He's not around. It's now about 6am.

    At this point, nothing for it but to report him AWOL. Call the Sergeant-Major, the Squadron Commander (Who's been staying up until we get going) now knows, and so people start getting dispatched to search the base. We have no idea what he could be thinking: Irwin is in the middle of the desert 30 miles from civilisation, he's not going anywhere.

    Shortly afterwards, I get a call from the platoon in the box.
    "Guess what, sir?"
    "Where was he?"
    "In the truck"

    Apparently, he decided he didn't want to play, got in the back of a HMMWV, into a sleeping bag, and went to sleep (While everyone else was still prepping to move) Oh, and to ensure he wasn't disturbed, he covered himself with everyone else's bags. He then, somehow, managed to stay asleep as the HMMWV careened cross-country for 45 minutes and didn't hear people calling for him. (Yeah, right). He was only discovered when the platoon sergeant stood on him.

    In the meantime, we finally set off, but our sleep time is now down to 'zero'. We set off on our day's training, but by the time we hit 19:00, the troops are utterly burned out. Including the 90 minutes of travel time to march the vehicles back to the yard, it's just too dangerous to keep the troops out any longer. As a result, our mandatory night training simply didn't happen, for the entire fricking 65-man (on the ground) troop. All because some E-4 sulked.

    The only consolation is that within 12 hours, he was busted down to Private.

    NTM
    Thats the kind of selfish son of a ***ch that doesnt belong in uniform... let him take his sh*tb*g attitude back to the private sector where lives dont depend on it......

    Leave a comment:


  • California Tanker
    replied
    Originally posted by Bravo20 View Post
    So he was where he should have been all the time in the back of the HMMWV, and he got busted because the Pln Sgt / Pln Comdr couldn't keep track of his men.
    Keeping track of your men requires some form of personal responsibility from those men, you can't put your own soldiers guarding each other to make sure that they don't skulk off, meaning that you are reliant on soldiers doing as best they can to be where they should be, doing what they should be doing, and letting their chain of command know if they're going to vanish somewhere for a while. It also assumes that when someone goes looking for you, you respond. "Everyone get out of the trucks for a headcount" is a pretty simple instruction, and only outright disobedience will result in the trooper staying in his sleeping bag. There's a difference between getting lost, and actively trying not to be found.

    Simply by getting in the bag in the first place was abandonment of duty: Everyone else in the troop was still preparing for movement so he was not where he should have been the whole time. He should have been up and helping out.

    NTM

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  • Barry
    replied
    E-4 in the US Army means either Specialist or Corporal (both recieve equal pay, but a Cpl is given responsibility and is a NCO)

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  • trellheim
    replied
    e-4 ... shouldn't a sgt know a little bit about responsibility ?

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  • ARNGScout
    replied
    So he was where he should have been all the time in the back of the HMMWV, and he got busted because the Pln Sgt / Pln Comdr couldn't keep track of his men.
    No - the back of a Humvee means in one of the back passenger seats not curled up in your fart-sack under everyone's bags. This is down to personal accountability/responsibility of the soldier in question - an E-4 should know better. Choosing your ride is not an option - discomfort comes with the job. He got busted as he wasn't doing what he was supposed to be doing - besides Medics are supposed to be there to look after the troops that there attached to - not to rack out when they feel like it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bravo20
    replied
    So he was where he should have been all the time in the back of the HMMWV, and he got busted because the Pln Sgt / Pln Comdr couldn't keep track of his men.

    Leave a comment:


  • trellheim
    replied
    there's a couple of lurkers here going "bet they can't find MY hiding place"

    Leave a comment:


  • dahamster
    replied
    Originally posted by clean it again View Post
    Send him to the glen and clean out the billets / showers after a exercise
    he would not do it again.

    if that does not work, peel spuds for a day
    bit far from the glen isn't he?

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  • clean it again
    replied
    Send him to the glen and clean out the billets / showers after a exercise
    he would not do it again.

    if that does not work, peel spuds for a day

    Leave a comment:


  • irishrgr
    replied
    Brilliant

    Bloody amazing, eh? What a f**king idiot....and a complete waste of Soldiers time. Good job on busting him, there are those who would have just given him a bollocking and left it at that. Granted I also know some NCO's who would have seen to it that he "fell" off the HMMV before being dragged up before the Commander.

    Still good job on doing the best with a bad situation. I've been to Ft Irwin and it is indeed a desolate and vast place.

    A

    Leave a comment:

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