Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Irish speaking unit in the RDF

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by Barry View Post
    ...On an aside, it's always amusing when, while sizing off for a GOH and the command "from the right, number" is given, if the tallest person (number 1) thinks that he's a bright spark, and starts off with "haon!", and proceeds to get the arse chewed off him.
    Err, Barry, I may be missing something, but WHY ?
    Tallest on the right, shortest on the left, from the RIGHT - number .......

    Originally posted by Connaught Stranger View Post
    That maybe so, but, when you do your "swearing in" or taking the oath to serve, did you do it in English or Irish?
    I, personally, was sworn in with a Protestant (me being Catholic, if a little lapsed) and an atheist.
    That one threw the attesting officer for a second until he remembered that there is also a
    declaration in lieu of swearing on the Bible. For the record, my swearing in was in English...
    "Well, stone me! We've had cocaine, bribery and Arsenal scoring two goals at home. But just when you thought there were truly no surprises left in football, Vinnie Jones turns out to be an international player!" (Jimmy Greaves)!"

    Comment


    • #32
      How do you teach the Tairgigh Airm ? What method do you use to identify the pauses ?

      If it's a count, what language are you counting in ?
      "Are they trying to shoot down the other drone? "

      "No, they're trying to fly the tank"

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by Truck Driver View Post
        Err, Barry, I may be missing something, but WHY ?
        Tallest on the right, shortest on the left, from the RIGHT - number .......



        I, personally, was sworn in with a Protestant (me being Catholic, if a little lapsed) and an atheist.
        That one threw the attesting officer for a second until he remembered that there is also a
        declaration in lieu of swearing on the Bible. For the record, my swearing in was in English...
        I have a quandary around this topic, which I' ll ask about elsewhere
        Last edited by Boomer; 15 May 2008, 13:10.
        "Well, stone me! We've had cocaine, bribery and Arsenal scoring two goals at home. But just when you thought there were truly no surprises left in football, Vinnie Jones turns out to be an international player!" (Jimmy Greaves)!"

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by Truck Driver View Post
          Err, Barry, I may be missing something, but WHY ?
          Tallest on the right, shortest on the left, from the RIGHT - number .......
          The tallest person will be on the right (it's how the sizing off works). Then the command "from the right, number" is given, so the tallest person is the one who starts, by saying "one". Except if said tall person is trying to be smart and says "haon", which leads to a cluster**** not long afterwards.

          Edit: Oh, and you should all have a look at the foot drill manual. It's in Irish AND English.
          Last edited by Barry; 15 May 2008, 12:44.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Barry View Post
            The tallest person will be on the right (it's how the sizing off works). Then the command "from the right, number" is given, so the tallest person is the one who starts, by saying "one". Except if said tall person is trying to be smart and says "haon", which leads to a cluster**** not long afterwards.

            Edit: Oh, and you should all have a look at the foot drill manual. It's in Irish AND English.
            Ah, yes. The whole "STOP! What language did I give the order in...?" scenario......
            "Well, stone me! We've had cocaine, bribery and Arsenal scoring two goals at home. But just when you thought there were truly no surprises left in football, Vinnie Jones turns out to be an international player!" (Jimmy Greaves)!"

            Comment


            • #36
              Yes TD Barry is 100% correct.
              If you give the command "from the right number" then they have been ordered to count in the language the order was given.
              On the ither hand if given "On Dheis Comhraigh" the count should be as Gaeilge.

              And if teaching foot drill orders are given as Gaeilge so the count must also be as Gaeilge. But for many the idea of "work on the haoin and pause on the do, tri! is unbelievably difficult.
              Without supplies no army is brave.

              —Frederick the Great,

              Instructions to his Generals, 1747

              Comment


              • #37
                Nothing quite beats being asked what haon, do and tri mean by someone who will be doing their leaving certificate in the next few months.

                Comment


                • #38
                  The drill manual is in Irish
                  Now try to teach it through Irish rather than just use the Irish Word of commnad and see how far you get with that...especially if you have people who have never had to learn Irish .

                  Bear in mind this has occured with non speakers in the DF and if the instructor feels proficent enough to teach it..he can do so.

                  There is no prequalification for the requirement to have Irish on entering the DF..so chances are very high that those you want to instruct maybe clueless in the language you choose to instruct in.

                  I'm not against the use of the language but in everyday use it should be optional rather than mandatory.

                  It has a nice touch as being the word of command but as far as getting the message across using it....don't think so.....
                  Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Sorry, I wasn’t too clear in my last post. I didn't say that you should instruct in Irish, what I said is that drill should be taught properly, and if the commands and responses should be given in Irish, then they should be given in Irish. If you allow a mixture of English and Irish just because Irish requires troops to be a bit more switched on then you are setting a dangerous precedent. Regarding the drill manual, I understand that it was written in the period before the decision was taken to move to drill commands in Irish. The manual of arms drill, a more modern publication, makes it clear that drill will be carried out in Irish.

                    Conn Stranger, I see you point regarding the oath, but I don't see what it has to do with drill. Drill should be carried out in Irish.
                    "Why, it appears that we appointed all of our worst generals to command the armies and we appointed all of our best generals to edit the newspapers. I mean, I found by reading a newspaper that these editor generals saw all of the defects plainly from the start but didn't tell me until it was too late. I'm willing to yield my place to these best generals and I'll do my best for the cause by editing a newspaper"
                    Gen. Robert E. Lee

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Numbering off and sizing into 2/3 ranks is about the only time when english is normally used as an order in foot drill, and that's for purposes of clarity. People have enough trouble with the concept of "odd numbers one pace forward, even numbers one pace to the rear" in English, never mind if you attempted to do it in Irish.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Barry View Post
                        Numbering off and sizing into 2/3 ranks is about the only time when english is normally used as an order in foot drill, and that's for purposes of clarity.
                        Sure don't worry about it too much anyway, unless it's on the pages which are missing from my manual (pg 14 - 17) then sizing off by height isn't even in the drill manual.

                        Originally posted by Barry View Post
                        People have enough trouble with the concept of "odd numbers one pace forward, even numbers one pace to the rear" in English, never mind if you attempted to do it in Irish.
                        "What number are you??!!
                        Uh....10...uh, 10 corporal.
                        So does that meake you odd or even????
                        Ummm...even?
                        Well there's something distinctly odd about you right now....two paces to the rear!!!"


                        *Smacks head*
                        "Attack your attic with a Steyr....as seen on the Late Late Show..."

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by concussion View Post
                          *Smacks head*
                          Hope that was you own noggin concussion, otherwise it's a bit A7
                          Beyond the Leap, beyond the law!

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Barry View Post
                            Whatever happening to only being as strong as the weakest man? Unless everyone in front of you knows how to count up to the required number in Irish, do it in English.
                            So if not everyone in the section is fully up on section attack you shouldn't do it is the same mentality??

                            Its a part of the training and should be learned. It would literally take one nights learning to get off all the commands for foot drill if you sat down and learned them so whats the problem. There's loads of shit thats taught and learned during training that is worthless to fighting or whatever job you have but its still done. This shouldn't be any different just because a few lads couldn't be arsed learning a few phrases off.

                            And I agree that its pretty much useless to do it in Irish but whats wrong with a bit of tradition? If anything I think it makes the connection for a lot of people that they are serving Ireland instead of just another job. When there are things like passing out parades it makes it look snappier in Irish as the commands sound better in my opinion and gives a bit of prode when families are watching. Nothing wrong with that. If some foot drill is taught to Irish command then it all should be, no half way.
                            Last edited by ELVIS; 15 May 2008, 21:36.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Im with Elvis on this it doesnt take a huge amount of effort, I trained a young lad who had no Irish as in not was bad at it in school but I mean never learnt it at all and he copped on to the commands after a while. All that he got extra from any other recruit was a sheet with all the orders spelled out on it phonetically.

                              Trained recruits over last summer and all the instruction given was given in Irish. The recruits soon got up to speed.
                              Lifes a bitch, so be her pimp!

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Isn't there a government directive of some sort that insists all documents, training etc must also be available through Irish?


                                Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X