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  • Army members test positive for drugs

    Army members test positive for drugs
    August 11, 2003
    (14:34)
    RTE
    ********************************
    Four members of the Defence Forces have been dismissed after they tested positive for drugs under a new screening programme introduced last year.

    However, an army spokesman would not indicate what rank those involved held or what substance was found.

    Up to 10% of the 10,000 members of the forces can be randomly tested under a Substance Abuse Programme which started in November.

    The compulsory screening was introduced mainly as a deterrent - as drug abuse has not been identified as a major problem in the forces.

  • #2
    if they are taking dope then they should go if from a safety point of view,I would not like a guy like that covering my back WOULD YOU!!

    Comment


    • #3
      Four dismissed from Defence Forces
      Liam Reid
      The Irish Times

      11-August-2003

      ******************************

      Four members of the Defence Forces have been dismissed after they tested positive for drugs under a new compulsory screening programme.

      The Defence Forces Substance Abuse Programme, which began testing in November, aims to test up to 10 per cent of the 12,000 soldiers, airmen and sailors in the Defence Forces every year. The scheme is similar to others operating in most western European armies.

      In the first six months of operation, more than 500 Defence Forces personnel were tested, with two being discharged after they tested positive.

      No details of the rank of the personnel discharged or the substances for which they tested positive have been made available.

      Since May, two more members have also tested positive and been subject to discharge orders, none of the four has appealed the discharges.

      While drug abuse has not been identified as a major problem in the Defence Forces, compulsory screening was introduced principally as a deterrent.

      Defence Force personnel of all ranks can be subject to the compulsory first-stage urine test, where they are also asked to fill out a form detailing any medication they are being prescribed.

      The urine test screens for all drugs prescribed under the Misuse of Drugs Acts, including cannabis, cocaine and opiates.

      Personnel are required to give two samples, one of which is used as a simple non-specific indicator test for the presence of banned substances.

      If a sample fails this test, a further sample is sent for detailed laboratory testing to one of a number of facilitates in England. The Defence Forces member whose sample is being tested chooses from a list of six centres where the sample can be tested.

      The only sanction for testing positive in the second test is an administrative discharge from the Defence Forces.

      This kind of discharge is seen as less serious than a disciplinary discharge.

      The programme also tests for the presence of most prescription drugs. Anybody found with traces in their urine but no prescription also faces discharge.

      According to figures from the Department of Defence, 531 personnel of all ranks were tested in the first six months of the programme.

      This included 89 commissioned officers, 204 non-commissioned officers and 238 privates or equivalents.

      A spokesman for the Defence Forces said the screening programme was “in line with best practice internationally”.

      Although dismissing personnel who test positive for so called soft drugs such as cannabis may sound harsh, it was absolutely necessary, the spokesman said.

      “It’s different to many other careers in that in day-to-day work, members are handling weapons and ammunition and military vehicles where they pose a risk to themselves, their comrades and the general public,” he said.

      “The taking of banned substances is not compatible with this type of work.”

      Comment


      • #4
        f*** em.
        Support the Search Function.

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        • #5
          they're perfectly right-guns and drugs do not mix and I personally wouldn't trust one of them to be covering my back out in the field.

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          • #6
            I wonder if the US do drug tests etc? Drug use was a big problem in the field for the US when they were in Vietnam

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            • #7
              I dont think so. Remember in afghanistan when the USAF let there pilots use speed or something like that to keep awake dueing flights. that did not end so good after they killed the canadians peacekeepers

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              • #8
                Does anyone know if RDF/FCA personnel have been tested for drugs?

                Personaly I've never heard of RDF personnel being tested (mind you theres not many RDF units near me) I think its a great idea that soldiers are being tested for drugs, bring it on!

                Comment


                • #9
                  I asked that question on a similar thread in the General section. The general consensus is that no RDF/FCA has been tested yet. However per the regs 10% of the RDF is to be tested annually too.

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                  • #10
                    Just like with the pilots in Afghanistan, the US supplied troops with drugs during Vietnam - dexedrine for example.

                    However the drug *problem* in Vietnam was more to do with people stationed at bases to the rear then with soldiers 'in the field'.

                    Just like Herr Klutz said, he wouldnt want some drugged up clown covering his back and you can take it for certain that the soldiers out in the fields of Vietnam didnt want it either - or stood for it.

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                    • #11
                      I wonder how long this will last?

                      And my guess is that tests in the RDF/FCÁ will turn up more positives than in the PDF.

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                      • #12
                        I wouldn't be surprised.

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                        • #13
                          DRUGS

                          I would not be suprised either. We had a guy goofing off on basic camp years ago and mentioned it. Drugs are bad full stop. Drug interdiction is a major job for the DF and to have somebody using drugs while a serving member is such a joke and a shame.:(

                          But we will get the vermin out:flagwave:

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                          • #14
                            well so far our levels have been lower than in other major european/NATO armies, though like I say we'll have to wait and see if the RDF lads can stand up to the standards set by the PDF guys.

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                            • #15
                              Still 4 positive tests out of the entire DF is not a bad result, now I wonder what the failure rate would be if random drink-driving tests were introduced throughout the Forces, I think there might be a few worried faces around the barracks then!

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