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  • #31
    Originally posted by northie View Post
    Fair enough i was making more of a comment on the entry criteria than your acquaintance/friend
    No problem, but the entry requirements may be different now, than back in the 90's
    CRIME SCENE INSTIGATOR

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    • #32
      Originally posted by northie View Post
      I'm pretty surprised at that. For getting into most orchestras it would be grade 8. I stopped after 5. I wasn't into learning scales etc. FMy favourite march to play with the concert band I played in was "Aces High" - great tuba solo in the middle!
      how doyou play scales on a Lambeg
      Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
      Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
      The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere***
      The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
      The best lack all conviction, while the worst
      Are full of passionate intensity.

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by northie View Post
        I take it that you march at a set number of paces a minute (if so what) and the conductors of the DF bands score their music accordingly. Civvy bands just tend to go with whats on the sheet music in front of them.
        The normal marching speed is 120 paces per minute, for pipes it is 90. It takes alot of effort to march properly with instruments and each instrument has its own characteristics while on the move. For example, the bass drum causes alot of pain in the lower back, a triangle would be nice imagine carrying a TUBA!

        The conductors job is to interpret the music, however the Drum Majors job is to lead the band while on the move. We dont have any proper drum majors, there are some in the pipebands but that position is not held in high regard as musicians are deemed more important. Music quality Vs pomp and pageantry.

        As far as I know the Army bands are mediocre compared to professional bandsmen in other armies. I dont see why a reservist band cannot be formed. Many world championship musicians play music as a hobby, in fact some world class bands across the border are part-timers. The question is resources; it is very expensive to kit out a band with instruments and then maintain them too, also there is no point having a band if they dont perform so they need alot of support. The PDF bands would not like to lose valuable resources to reservists.

        There is nothing to stop reservists setting up their own band anyway, once they can practice together. Start small

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        • #34
          There was a Pipe band in the southern brigade reserve for a while.
          They were brutal.

          their drummer couldnt keep a pace.


          Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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          • #35
            I have to say I find it surprising and somewhat disappointing that the Irish Army doesn't have a Pipes & Drums Platoon in each Infantry Bn., piping is after all, as much an Irish tradition as a Scottish one. A full brass band is an expensive option, and even the British Army (sadly) no longer has a band for every Bn, but a P&D platoon would not be anywhere near as expensive and can have a primary role as say, the MG or Defence platoon. I know there are a number (?) of official Irish Army pipe bands and a few semi-official ones too evidently, but surely it wouldn't cost the earth to have a modest P & D Pl in each regular Inf. Bn?
            I watched the 1st. Bn. Irish Guards on Trooping the Colour this morning, a cracking spectacle with loads of great Irish tunes and some excellent piping from the Irish and Scots guards pipers. I see the Micks pipers wear the proper Saffron kilts and not those God-awful orange ones I've seen elsewhere.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by FougaM View Post
              The normal marching speed is 120 paces per minute, for pipes it is 90. It takes alot of effort to march properly with instruments and each instrument has its own characteristics while on the move. For example, the bass drum causes alot of pain in the lower back, a triangle would be nice imagine carrying a TUBA!

              The conductors job is to interpret the music, however the Drum Majors job is to lead the band while on the move. We dont have any proper drum majors, there are some in the pipebands but that position is not held in high regard as musicians are deemed more important. Music quality Vs pomp and pageantry.

              As far as I know the Army bands are mediocre compared to professional bandsmen in other armies. I dont see why a reservist band cannot be formed. Many world championship musicians play music as a hobby, in fact some world class bands across the border are part-timers. The question is resources; it is very expensive to kit out a band with instruments and then maintain them too, also there is no point having a band if they dont perform so they need alot of support. The PDF bands would not like to lose valuable resources to reservists.

              There is nothing to stop reservists setting up their own band anyway, once they can practice together. Start small
              Imagine carrying a tuba? I don't need to imagine, I did carry one. Including during a thunder and lightning storm in casement park, belfast. Fun times indeed!

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by jaeger View Post
                I have to say I find it surprising and somewhat disappointing that the Irish Army doesn't have a Pipes & Drums Platoon in each Infantry Bn., piping is after all, as much an Irish tradition as a Scottish one. A full brass band is an expensive option, and even the British Army (sadly) no longer has a band for every Bn, but a P&D platoon would not be anywhere near as expensive and can have a primary role as say, the MG or Defence platoon. I know there are a number (?) of official Irish Army pipe bands and a few semi-official ones too evidently, but surely it wouldn't cost the earth to have a modest P & D Pl in each regular Inf. Bn?
                I watched the 1st. Bn. Irish Guards on Trooping the Colour this morning, a cracking spectacle with loads of great Irish tunes and some excellent piping from the Irish and Scots guards pipers. I see the Micks pipers wear the proper Saffron kilts and not those God-awful orange ones I've seen elsewhere.
                Every PDF infantry battalion, the Aer Corps & the Naval Service has a pipe band.

                http://www.military.ie/army/specialists/music/pipes.htm
                Last edited by DeV; 13 June 2009, 19:23.

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                • #38
                  on their establishment
                  "Fellow-soldiers of the Irish Republican Army, I have just received a communication from Commandant Pearse calling on us to surrender and you will agree with me that this is the hardest task we have been called upon to perform during this eventful week, but we came into this fight for Irish Independence in obedience to the commands of our higher officers and now in obedience to their wishes we must surrender. I know you would, like myself, prefer to be with our comrades who have already fallen in the fight - we, too, should rather die in this glorious struggle than submit to the enemy." Volunteer Captain Patrick Holahan to 58 of his men at North Brunswick Street, the last group of the Four Courts Garrison to surrender, Sunday 30 April 1916.

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                  • #39
                    Not quite sure where to put this...

                    Celtic Aire to Deploy

                    Posted 11/18/2009 Updated 11/24/2009

                    by Master Sgts. Brian McCurdy and Matthew Irish
                    The USAF Band

                    11/18/2009 - BOLLING AFB, D.C. -- Celtic Aire, comprised of four members of the Singing Sergeants, will deploy to forward locations overseas in December. The group has been in existence since 2007, and has been featured at the White House, as well as at diplomatic dinners around the National Capitol Region. This is the first deployment for Celtic Aire.

                    As part of the performance, each member alternates singing and playing traditional instruments. For instance, Tech. Sgt. Julia Brundage, a founding member of Celtic Aire, might start a tune playing the penny whistle, then pick up a Bodhran (Irish drum), and end the song as lead vocalist.

                    Sgt. Brundage has always enjoyed the sounds of Celtic music and wanted to find a way to perform it in her primary job in The U.S. Air Force Band. "I've always enjoyed earthy, grass-roots folk music that you can really tap your foot to."

                    Along with Sgt. Brundage, other members of the group include Master Sgt. Eric Sullivan, and Technical Sgts. Joseph Haughton and Emily Lewis. "This ensemble has really given me a chance to grow as a musician and learn new instruments and styles," said Sgt. Haughton, Celtic Aire's guitarist and vocalist. Deployments are not a new concept for The Air Force Band. Other groups sent overseas for troop morale performances include Max Impact and the Airmen of Note.

                    The four performing members of Celtic Aire will not be traveling alone. Also deploying are Senior Master Sgt. Deb Volker and Master Sgts. Mike Ryan and Mark Hannah.

                    Sgt. Volker, a member of the Air Force Strings, will deploy as the NCOIC of the group. Sgt. Ryan, The Air Force Band's Director of Tours, will act as the Superintendent of the AF Central Command Operations. Sgt. Mark Hannah, the Concert Band and Singing Sergeants' Audio Engineer, will deploy as Celtic Aire's Audio Engineer.

                    Celtic Aire will deploy for two months beginning in mid-December. We wish them safe travel, and we look forward to their return in mid-March 2010.





                    The Air Force Central band, Celtic Aire, performing at a base in Southwest Asia.
                    Last edited by Fireplace; 14 January 2010, 21:32.
                    You will never have a quiet world until you knock the patriotism out of the human race

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by hedgehog View Post
                      how doyou play scales on a Lambeg
                      Don' t be bold......

                      "Well, stone me! We've had cocaine, bribery and Arsenal scoring two goals at home. But just when you thought there were truly no surprises left in football, Vinnie Jones turns out to be an international player!" (Jimmy Greaves)!"

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by DeV View Post
                        Every PDF infantry battalion, the Aer Corps & the Naval Service has a pipe band.

                        http://www.military.ie/army/specialists/music/pipes.htm
                        Yes on paper they do, but in reality.....

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                        • #42
                          Army Bands

                          As a member of the army band for the last 26 years there have been times when i've felt that most soldiers don't really appreciate or understand the work that the bands do and the role we play within the whole structure of the Defence Forces. What are your opinions of the Defence Force Bands and what role if any do you think the serve?
                          http://www.military.ie/army/specialists/music/index.htm

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                          • #43
                            So long as soldiering is their first and forefost profession. Bands are integral part of military tradition and honours being rendered.

                            The "Fianna" were after all a band of warrior musicians/poets/bards.
                            "The Question is not: how far you will take this? The Question is do you possess the constitution to go as far as is needed?"

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                            • #44
                              Having just seen this post i would like to answer at least some of the questions put by some of the posters. Up to about 10 years ago the DF had 4 bands based in Dublin (Army No. 1 Band), Cork (Band of The Southern Command), The Curragh (Band of The Curragh Command) and Athlone (Band of The Western Command). As part of the Price Waterhouse restructuring of The Defence Forces, The Curragh Band was to be phased out. Since then there have been no new members in The Curragh Band although the band still exists (on paper). Currently i think there are 5 remaining members of this band. They now travel to Dublin every day to play with The Army No. 1 Band. The restructuring also re-labeled the remaining bands to Dublin (Band of the 2nd Eastern Brigade), Cork (Band of The 1st Southern Brigade) and Athlone (Band of The 4th Western Brigade). In the past, instrumentalists were taken in to The Army School of Music in Cathal Brugha normally at 15 yrs old (or thereabouts) and trained for 2 years as student bandsmen. Although the school building still exists, the school is no longer there. The school was an ideal situation as it allowed the students to be trained in music, footdrill, military law and matters of discipline. All entries to the DFSM (Defence Forces School of Music) since the closure of the school now come in with a minimum Grade 7 on their chosen instrument. The majority of these spend somewhere between 2 - 6 months practicing mostly on their own in the school before being posted to one of the 3 bands; usually a band of their own choice. If they don't get to go to the band that they want then the usual choice seems to be. Ok Sir! here's me kit. I'm outa here. Most of the instruments used throughout the bands would be around mid-range as regards quality and price. There have been occasions where certain players have been allowed to select instruments of there choice. Instruments can be quite expensive. For instance a Bassoon can usually cost somewhere in the region of 15,000 Euro. Tubas as mentioned by someone can usually cost anywhere between 3k to 7k depending on the make (usually Besson Imperial 700) and the type. The bands use 2 types (E flat and B flat). Most players would normally have 2 instruments, although some players may have up to 3. Clarinet players have 2 types. Plastic for outdoor work and wooden (more expensive) for indoor work. In recent times there have been very experienced players who have joined the bands to discover that just because you can sit on a chair for 2 hours and play better than anyone else it doesn't mean that you can march around the square with no problems. Since the loss of 'The School' this i think has been one of many problems. Sitting with an instrument as opposed to marching with an instrument are worlds apart..believe me!!
                              There has been times in the past where entrants have transferred from regimental units into the Bands but very few.

                              Originally posted by hedgehog
                              what performance

                              just becaus e you have a CD of them playing akey break heart and time after time by Cyndi Lauper


                              All of the bands are full time and the 3 present bands perform on average 200 engagements per year. The type of jobs covered include Military, Free Public Performances, Free Festival Recitals, School Concerts (in conjuction with The Dept. of Education) Trumpeter, (Funerals - Honour Guards etc.) Music Ensembles, (quintets - jazz ensembles etc.). Obviously most of the work is military work, Passing Out Parades, Guards of Honour, Laying up of Colours, Cadet Commisionings and everywhere else that someone decides that they'd like a bit of background music. The ones you mention who trained with the dftc (e) are all now sgts and contrary to what you may have been told crossing over to an inf unit was never an option for them as not all of the normal recruit syllabus was applied to their specific training course.

                              Originally posted by Goldie fish
                              The question about the band though, don't people PAY to see them play?

                              Does what they earn in appearances not balance out the cost of their upkeep?
                              The cost of hiring an army band is ridiculously cheap (a lot less than €1000) You would be surprised how many organisations find ways to get around this and therefore there are roughly no more than 10 paid engagements in the 3 bands combined each year.

                              Originally posted by Dazzler
                              Yeah, they played City Halla while back and tickets were in the Region of €20. However that may have been for Charity!

                              The Cork City hall concert along with others performed throughout the country at different times of the year, are all in aid of The Army Benevolent Fund.

                              Originally posted by Bravo20
                              Having marched behind both civilian and military bands, there must be different tempos played by civilians because they are a bitch to march behind.
                              The accepted marching pace for soldiers within The DF is 120 paces pm so this is the marching pace used for playing all marches. Pipe bands also march at this pace. Civilian bands do tend to march at a shorter pace but not slower to compensate for younger players...... Civvies and soldiers all read the same music. There is no difference!!
                              .


                              Hopfully this answers at least some of the questions put forward iin this thread.
                              http://www.military.ie/army/specialists/music/index.htm

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by DFSM_SGT View Post
                                As a member of the army band for the last 26 years there have been times when i've felt that most soldiers don't really appreciate or understand the work that the bands do and the role we play within the whole structure of the Defence Forces. What are your opinions of the Defence Force Bands and what role if any do you think the serve?
                                You shoud console yourself that you have been right for the last 26 years
                                Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
                                Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
                                The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere***
                                The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
                                The best lack all conviction, while the worst
                                Are full of passionate intensity.

                                Comment

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