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  • British Army A Free Book

    Ladies and Gentlemen,
    I last year published "A Moment In Time : The British Army", in a limited run edition. Upon completion of the sale of the books, I offered it up on various websites FREE for interested person. For some reason I could not get onto this website until this week.

    This offer is as per the printed hard copy of the book less the illustrations (124 photos, and 70 badge drawings, the property respectively of my youngest son, and the eldest son of my eldest, and are not on the file for copyright reasons). Converted from A3 to A4, filling 456 pages.

    5,000 + have gone out (with many respondents stating they have sent it on, one chap to 109 others). It has also been put up on nine websites.

    There has only been one genuine error found in it, by Bob Griffin, the author of two authoritive books on the Chieftain, and Conqueror tanks. This relating to dozer blades on Challenger tanks, and was a transcription error from my handwritten notes to the PC.

    There have been plenty of people telling me that entries were in variance with WIKEPEDIA and suchlike, all have received from me references to authoritive sources. One of the reasons why I am giving it out for free is need to correct the wholescale inaccuracies prevalent upon the internet.

    I am informed by many recepients that it is a authoritive reference tool, that covers a vast amount of material, including much relating to Commonwealth and foreign military forces. Such as the regimental alligences between the Bns of The Royal Australian Regiment and the Regiments of Footguards, or exchange personnel. Also the Royal Marines, nuclear weapons security, the RAF Regiment, UK Special Forces, and military parachuting, equipment, unit organisations, foreign enlistments, drill, military music, history, and trivia right down to the cost of a one man ration pack, and why there are 13 studs in a Guardsmans boot sole.

    If you want a copy please send a email to gam47@bigpond.com - DO NOT CUT AND PASTE type the address in otherwise my software will reject the message, and place your address within the body of the message text, it saves time for me.

    I wrote the book, with in mind what would I want in such a book.
    Yours,
    G/.
    G.A.MACKINLAY
    Country New South Wales, Australia.

  • #2
    The British Army A Free Book

    Ladies and Gentlemen,

    I must apologise for not making myself clear. The item offered is not the original hard cover book, but a electronic file containing a 'E-Book'.

    This being the text of the original, without any illustrations.

    All of those people who sent me their home address, I am unable to send to you a hard copy of the book, because as I said all 250 of them were sold in the first week.

    If you wish to obtain a copy, please :
    PUT YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS WITHIN THE TEXT OF THE MESSAGE.
    and send to me at :
    gam47@bigpond.com
    DO NOT cut and paste the address, but, type it in.

    Having just looked at a number of the thread on the first page of the website, much of what is being discussed is answered within the books pages. There is nothing within it that is not from items readily available within the Public Domain.
    Yours,
    G/.
    G.A.MACKINLAY

    Comment


    • #3
      Mr Mackinley, I got the book from you a couple of years back and you asked me to send you any comments, I'm afraid to say that the book is lying in one of my folders on the puter and it is only now and again I take a look at it. Very heavy going and I only go to it if I need info on something, a very good read but far too long. Maybe one day I will sit down and take a good long look at it but just to let you know, I sill have it and use it, again, thanks.

      Jim

      Comment


      • #4
        British Army A Free Book

        Jim,

        my thanks for your comments.

        It is a huge piece of work, and you need to look at it for what it really is - a HANDBOOK. Something that you pick up flick through and find the item, or just browse for information in a quite moment.

        This is why when I send them out, I always state that it is a more user friendly item in printed form.

        Whilst PCs are devices that I do not know how we lived and worked without before - and I have been using the terrible things for thirty years now (starting off with the original AMSTRAD using audio cassettes as the files. But they are limited, and unlike a book you cannot pick up a PC and flick backwards and forwards looking at the info. You would be suprised just how many people (with good solid IT skills) still use a card index system for specialised work.

        The original book was A3 ie. coffee table book size, double column with photographic/drawn illustrations, with box components, as well as all the appendices etc. To change it into a format that could be understood easily by people, meant that the nice easy to read with illustrations to break up the solid word mass had to go.

        But, in the current format, if printed off and bound up in some matter it is a very useful tool. I was talking just before to a chap in the UK with whom I deal, he a employee of the Royal British Legion. He had ten copies of the text printed out for the various sections of the welfare department, and has had feedback from people with no military knowledge saying just how well it helps them understand the system. He had e-mailed wanting to know if I had done the equivelent for the Royal Navy and RAF - sorry but no.

        If you print out say just the items of greatest interest to you, you will I feel get greater benefit out of it.
        Yours,
        G/.
        G.A.MACKINLAY

        Comment


        • #5
          British Army A Free Book

          Ladies and Gentlemen,
          I must apologise, I have been up working in Far NW QLD for ten days. In this time some nine people have written to me asking whether they should get a copy of the text of this book, being not sure if it is worthwhile having read the comments of the gentleman above.
          Well, its pointless asking me to blow my own trumpet, I am the biaised author of the document. All I can do is put up some snippets from the text for you to look at and make up your own mind.
          And also to say that in some of the current threads of this Discussion Board, the factual information needed is contained with the text.
          I must apologise also for not responding to you individually, but, there are only 24 hours in a day, and I need them to be at least of 31 hours!
          If any person of the fifty plus who have ordered the text having read about it from this site would care to put up a few words as to the value of it - be they good or bad, I would be grateful
          Yours,
          G/.
          G.A.MACKINLAY

          Comment


          • #6
            British Army A Free Book

            Ladies and Gentlemen,
            I must apologise, I have been up working in Far NW QLD for ten days. In this time some nine people have written to me asking whether they should get a copy of the text of this book, being not sure if it is worthwhile having read the comments of the gentleman above.
            Well, its pointless asking me to blow my own trumpet, I am the biaised author of the document. All I can do is put up some snippets from the text for you to look at and make up your own mind.
            And also to say that in some of the current threads of this Discussion Board, the factual information needed is contained with the text.
            I must apologise also for not responding to you individually, but, there are only 24 hours in a day, and I need them to be at least of 31 hours!
            If any person of the fifty plus who have ordered the text having read about it from this site would care to put up a few words as to the value of it - be they good or bad, I would be grateful
            Yours,
            G/.
            G.A.MACKINLAY

            Comment


            • #7
              British Army A Free Book snippet 1

              Regimental entry from Chapter on Royal Armoured Corps Regiments
              Pipes and Drums, were formed in The Queen's Royal Irish Hussars in Paderborn, Germany, on the 17th March 1973 for St. Patrick's Day, originally just two pipers, but no drums. They "just existed until 1987" when the new CO threw his weight behind them, recruiting a Pipe Major from The Irish Guards. All members are either CR-2 crewmen or support personnel. Dress of Saffron Kilt with a green, gold braided Pipers jacket and a garter blue and green shawl with the White Horse of Hannover as a brooch, the drummers wearing traditional Hussars ceremonial dress. With antecedent regiments having both Irish and Scots origins, its parade repertoire includes The Minstrel Boy, Highland Cathedral, St Patrick's Day, The Garb of Old Gaul, March of the Scottish Archers.
              from Chapter on Royal Engineers
              The normal peace time establishment for a Close Support Engineer Squadron (or Field Squadron) RE is 166 personnel consisting of eight officers and 158 NCOs and Sappers, organised into; SHQ 2+ 5, Sigs Tp 1+17, Echelon 1+18 (including MT Section 7, RE Fitter Section 3), 1,2,3 Fd Tps each 1+31, Sp Tp 1+25, War Establishment take it to 230, with Fd Tps having increasing to 1+44, Sp Tp 1+40, Echelon 1+28. Troops are numbered normally one to three. With 68 B, C Vehicles and trailers
              from Chapter dealing with infantry unit organisation, tactical operation etc.
              Sniper Platoon, to have 16 trained snipers in eight sniper pairs (armd inf to remain at eight?), commanded by a WOII or CSgt, with a Sgt as 2IC, and two Cpls. Due to the limited numbers of L115A3 rifles being purchased, only eight per bn will be issued. One in each sniper pair armed so, the observer having a L85A2. The need for a scoped weapon in each rifle pl is considered to be now filled by the L86A2 LSW?
              from Irish Guards entry in Chapter on Foot Guards Regiments.
              ........The Irish War Pipes or Brian Boru Pipes (ie. those with two drone) were on Ordnance issue until the early 1960's to all Irish infantry regiments, however since all pipers trained at the (then) School of Piping were taught on the Scots War pipes (ie. those with three drone) and preferred to use them, the Ordnance refused to provide two different types, also the Irish pipes cost over twice the price of the Scots! - - - - - - The regimental quick march 'St Patrick's Day' is a traditional march used by many of the disbanded Irish regiments, while the haunting 'Let Erin Remember' is the slow.
              (2 ) Has an Irish Wolf Hound as mascot, Fearghal, the fourteenth in service that is the responsibility of the Corps of Drums. One of the tallest of all breeds and, sadly, prone to a short lifespan compared with smaller dogs. They have a noble elegance and are full of affection, if you want a bear-sized dog to hug, the one for you. The first, Brian Boru in 1902, but they were officially a Regimental Pet until 1961, there was a gap of 22 years after Cruachan was prematurally retired after causing a diplomatic incident in 1929 (solved at Foreign Minister level) when he killed on the second attempt, the greyhound pet of the Italian Ambassador to The Court of St James, This however was not his greatest sin, he liked to go AWOL and always find a marching party of Coldstream Guards to march with!........... On parade the animal wears a solid silver collar embossed with the IG badge (dog is controlled by a choke collar).
              (4) Is one of the very few Army organisations that are now commonly known by their nickname, "The Micks". Great swathes of fresh shamrocks are worn on the headdress of "The Micks" on St. Patrick's Day (17 March), a party also festoons the statue outside the Guards Chapel of the greatest "Mick", Field Marshal, The Earl Alexander. After the parade and non-denominational church service, St Patrick's Day lunch to the Other Ranks is waited upon by the officers and the Members of the WO and Sgt's WO Mess. The "Micks" never "Mount" on the great day, and for obvious reasons, nor the day after! The shamrock has come from the same supplier in County Cork since 1986, Mrs O'Keith, she even supplying it to the Bn on operations. The Royal Irish celebrate the day, but, not to the same degree of “joyfulness”!
              (5) There is much mythology about the Irish Gds; it has never been a solely Roman Catholic religion recruited regiment, the highest level of RC within a single battalion was in the Great War with 80% at one time (at one stage in WWII, it had a massive influx of men of the Jewish faith from the East End of London through Chelsea Barracks, whilst many anti-Nazi Germans went through its ranks on the way to such as SOE (Special Operations Executive), Intelligence Corps or No 10 (Inter-Allied) Commando); nor are its colours solely consecrated by the Army senior RC Chaplain, but in the normal manner; also the regiment did serve in Ulster during Operation Banner.
              It averages 40 serving members from Eire at anyone time, which is the largest body of Irish citizens in the Army (the R Irish in its two battalions in total averages 7% recruited from the Republic).
              It is however, probably the strongest family recruited regiment in the Army, this uniquely illustrated by The Queen's Guard Mount, 6th February 1996, The Captain, the CO, Lt Col Sebastian Roberts (he relinquishing command shortly afterwards, subsequently Maj Gen commanding Household Division 2003-07, and with two sons commissioned into the IG), The Subaltern, brother, Major Cassian, and youngest brother, Lt Fabian, The Ensign, their mother (of ten children) Mrs Nicola Roberts inspected the Guard prior to the Mount!

              Comment


              • #8
                British Army A Free Book Snippet II

                from Chapter on Infantry of the Line.
                2 R Irish NOTES :
                (1) On 1st September 2007, The Royal Irish Rangers (abbreviated as Rangers), was retitled as 2nd Battalion, The Royal Irish Regiment (Territorial Army). This had not previously been announced. Interestingly, both Loyalists and Republicans condemned the name change, although for different reasons! Through the various Territorial Army regiments it descended from, it claims origins from the Irish Militia Regiments raised in August 1793.
                (2) March 2008 112 members of the Bn raised the 140 strong Imjin Company (named in memory of the Royal Ulster Rifles battle in Korea in 1951), for the Force Protection role with 16 Air Asslt Bde, with individuals posted to the 1st Bn. And a further four members were deployed to Iraq.
                from chapter on Royal Marines.
                Shipboard Marines Once the reason for the RM existence, now apart from temporary duty detachments from FPGRM, the only permanent on board ship marines are those of the six strong 'Ship's Detachment Royal Marines, HMS Endurance', the fleet ice breaker/ice patrol ship. The single destroyers/frigates that form Atlantic Patrol (North) (formerly Caribbean Guardship), Atlantic Patrol (South) (formerly Falklands Guardship) (both supported by a RFA tanker), and the Falklands Islands Patrol Ship, have constantly replaced detachments from FPGRM or from a Commando). A number of new ships are fitted to carry RM detachments in austere accommodation, such as the Type 45 Daring Class Destroyers with 60, the Clyde class offshore patrol ships with 30, or the Austute Class SSN to carry 16 SBS operators and their equipment.
                From section Infantry weapons.
                L9A1 51mm Mortar This superb little platoon level, indirect fire weapon (and simple to use) was to have been phased out with the introduction of the L85A2 mounted 40mm UGL, and the 40mm ALGL and hand carried illuminating flares, but, its effectiveness has once again been proven in recent operations..................Anecdotal and visual evidence show it also as being a very effective direct fire weapon in Afghanistan. June 2007 operational stock held by Army 1,190, from 2,093 held in June 2005, the complete Reserve (war) Stock of brand new weapons was scrapped!............The Austrian M6—895C 60mm Hirtenberger Mortar (commonly called a 'Commando' mortar) is to be acquired, a expensive, heavy and complex item in comparison to the 51mm, with expensive ammunition, inferior in performance to the 51mm (24 initially ordered).
                from section on Wheeled Fighting Vehicles.
                Truck Armoured Mk2, Urban Patrol Vehicle, 6.5 litre, 4x4, Diesel, GMC. Called 'Tavern'. 105 were purchased (2000) for urban patrol work in Northern Ireland, carrying two in the cab, four in rear, replacing Land Rover Armoured Patrol Vehicles. Very little known about them, apart from they were purchased from the US, with 96 in the Province, and eight in UK for training, and are very unpopular with their users........... Often confused with the EOD vehicle, the GKN Armoured, 4x4 Tactica, ................being replaced by a mix of DURO and Wedgewood vehicles.
                from section on Policing and Legal Services.
                Northern Ireland Security Guard Service NISGS Formed some time (? details) after the commencement of Operation Banner, from the Civilian Armed Patrol Service (extant for many years), which due to its title and regulations had a very uncertain legal status, as The Northern Ireland Guard Service (until someone grasped the meaning of its abbreviation in the 1990's, when rapidly changed!). ...................... Approximately 500 strong and have full powers of search and arrest within MoD and certain other........................

                from section on Policing and Legal Services.
                (4) The last Army Prison, at Shepton Mallet in Somerset (renowned for its cider), 1939 to 1942, then 1948-1966, was equally renowned for its 'hard' regime (having in 1963 been escort to a soldier sentenced to three years imprisonment, the writer would describe as "terrifying"). Between 1942-1948, the US Army in Britain, maximum security gaol, 18 US Army soldiers were executed there, with the only two caucasians, by firing squad, for other races by hanging. The maximum security, Her Majesties Prison Shepton Mallet is the oldest active prison in Britain, opened in 1610, the American built execution 'tower' is still extant, its red brick construction totally out of place with the ancient stone walls (the bullet marks from the firing squads still seen).
                From chapter dealing with Uniformed organisations related to the Army
                The Sovereign's Mace was presented to the Royal Hospital by The Queen, the Hospital had previously no distinctive device, the Mace is now carried at all the ceremonial events at the Hospital. Donated by Ronald Gerard OBE, KSJ, a property developer, it is a traditional truncheon, similar in appearance to that of the RGR (only in no way as heavy!).

                Comment


                • #9
                  British Army A Free Book

                  Ladies and Gentlemen,
                  for those of you who acquired a copy of the book text, I made reference to a way of replacing the illustrations (removed for copyright) with a series of books.
                  To alleviate that expense, a chap in Chile who acquired the book put me onto a magnificent website.
                  The owner of Plain Military website is one Mr Tony Hoare, it a website jam packed full of photos of British vehicles taken on Salisbury Plain at :
                  http://plain-military.tripod.com
                  he has no problems with his photos being downloaded.
                  In its content it covers the vast majority of British Army aviation, AFVs, B vehicles and some C vehicles, as well as other equipment that I record and describe in the books pages. So it will fill partially the need for those who acquired the text.
                  The photographic content is quite incredible, and would be ideal for modellers, it being of the same standard as those photo displays of items of equipment that are shown in the magazine Military Modelling.
                  For interest, the electronic file of the book has now gone out to some 7,300 recipients, with many informing me that they have forwarded further copies on!
                  Yours,
                  G/.
                  G.A.MACKINLAY

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    bump, took a while to approve the last post
                    Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent.
                    Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent.
                    Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil?
                    Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      British Army A Free Book

                      Ladies and Gentlemen,
                      I received a private message this AM from a gentleman wanting to known how to obtain a copy of the electronic text.

                      As previously stated, please send a message to :
                      gam47@bigpond.com

                      Having acquired some new protective software, you do not need now to put your address in the text of the message.

                      A patient this AM showed me his copy of the text, which he had enhanced during his PC course at Adult Learning with photos from the Plain Military website, and others relating to ceremonial. His wife who is doing book binding, then bound the whole up into a quite magnificent piece of work. He greatly pleased, I equally so that someone would believe that the work was worth this effort!
                      Yours,
                      G/.
                      G.A.MACKINLAY

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I haven't read it all but used as a reference at times and its fantastic,

                        Again thank you
                        Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          British Army A Free Book

                          Mr Murphy,
                          thanks for the kind words.

                          I also keep a copy beside my work desk for use as a reference, because it has everything at hand, and I find that I use it least once a day!

                          Two people this evening have told me that they have printed it off, and used phots from the website shown to enhance the printed copy.

                          Which is very good, as a visual image enhances dramatically the printed pages. In the hard cover print, it was A3 in size (the efile prints out onto A4) and the illustrations were within the text (such as the cap badge beside each unit entry), and they broke it up very well, but, you did not lose the flow of the text.
                          Yours,
                          G/.
                          G.A.MACKINLAY

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            This book will be really useful for my degree this year, thanks
                            I knew a simple soldier boy.....
                            Who grinned at life in empty joy,
                            Slept soundly through the lonesome dark,
                            And whistled early with the lark.

                            In winter trenches, cowed and glum,
                            With crumps and lice and lack of rum,
                            He put a bullet through his brain.
                            And no one spoke of him again.

                            You smug-faced crowds with kindling eye
                            Who cheer when soldier lads march by,
                            Sneak home and pray you'll never know
                            The hell where youth and laughter go.

                            Comment

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