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  • Originally posted by Flamingo View Post
    A few years ago, some friends from the US were over, including their father, Marvin (in his 70’s). We got the ferry over to Ireland with them, and Marvin was very excited, he said it was his first time ever on a ship at sea. I knew he was a USN Vet, but when I asked him how come, he said he’d spent seven years in the USN based in Chicago the whole time - be never got near the sea!

    Anyway, I digress, carry on...
    It was most likely Marvin's first time on salt water , lake Michigan is pretty big but not the biggest of the Great Lakes but you do get ocean going vessels arriving in the lakes from the Atlantic via St Laurence Seaway .
    Don't spit in my Bouillabaisse .

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Laners View Post
      It was most likely Marvin's first time on salt water , lake Michigan is pretty big but not the biggest of the Great Lakes but you do get ocean going vessels arriving in the lakes from the Atlantic via St Laurence Seaway .
      I'm sure flamingo has a little chuckle when ever he sees this scene from a Few Good Men

      https://youtu.be/6SMp3ALALqE
      It was the year of fire...the year of destruction...the year we took back what was ours.
      It was the year of rebirth...the year of great sadness...the year of pain...and the year of joy.
      It was a new age...It was the end of history.
      It was the year everything changed.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Laners View Post
        It was most likely Marvin's first time on salt water , lake Michigan is pretty big but not the biggest of the Great Lakes but you do get ocean going vessels arriving in the lakes from the Atlantic via St Laurence Seaway .
        He enjoyed it, he spent the trip on deck - luckily enough it was good weather!
        'He died who loved to live,' they'll say,
        'Unselfishly so we might have today!'
        Like hell! He fought because he had to fight;
        He died that's all. It was his unlucky night.
        http://www.salamanderoasis.org/poems...nnis/luck.html

        Comment


        • Originally posted by CTU View Post
          I'm sure flamingo has a little chuckle when ever he sees this scene from a Few Good Men

          https://youtu.be/6SMp3ALALqE
          I’d forgotten that one!
          'He died who loved to live,' they'll say,
          'Unselfishly so we might have today!'
          Like hell! He fought because he had to fight;
          He died that's all. It was his unlucky night.
          http://www.salamanderoasis.org/poems...nnis/luck.html

          Comment


          • Originally posted by na grohmiti View Post
            Rant accepted, if it's any consolation my first visit to DL was by sea, in a leisure boat, via the yacht club. Their showers were much better than that found aboard.
            I was a frequent visitor over the years since and always liked the vibe there.
            My last visit in 2018, I was shocked at the decline of the whole town. I think the decline of the Harbour contributed largely to this. That and of course Heroin.
            It's middle class junkyville for a long time now. The end of the ferry service knocked out passing trade for the hotels, resturants and shops. No parking in the town also messed up shopping so people just head to Dundrum. Also the Naval pier the last time I was there it had a 2 meter wire fence around it's waters edge.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by sofa View Post
              It's middle class junkyville for a long time now. The end of the ferry service knocked out passing trade for the hotels, resturants and shops. No parking in the town also messed up shopping so people just head to Dundrum. Also the Naval pier the last time I was there it had a 2 meter wire fence around it's waters edge.
              Has been junkie ridden for a long time.

              Town centre went seriously down hill when they opened the 2nd shopping centre (Tesco Bloomfield) in the town centre. Last time I was in the original shopping centre about half the units were vacant. Top floor is now becoming a primary care centre

              Comment


              • The Naval Pier got it's name , and use , as it was a trade for the removal of the Naval Buoy from the middle of the harbour. It was some evolution on the Corvette, put down a sea boat, rowing, with a Buoy Jumper, come up to the buoy, ring lifted by the buoy jumper,snap on your Buoy wire, heave up to the Buoy. Jumper (s) had to be strong swimmers. Then the ship lowered it's anchor cable, sans anchor, with a buoy shackle attached. The jumper shackled on to the buoy and he/they were recovered by boat. In the RN they climbed back up the Chain to the focsle. I would think in legal useage that pier is ours.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by ancientmariner View Post
                  The Naval Pier got it's name , and use , as it was a trade for the removal of the Naval Buoy from the middle of the harbour. It was some evolution on the Corvette, put down a sea boat, rowing, with a Buoy Jumper, come up to the buoy, ring lifted by the buoy jumper,snap on your Buoy wire, heave up to the Buoy. Jumper (s) had to be strong swimmers. Then the ship lowered it's anchor cable, sans anchor, with a buoy shackle attached. The jumper shackled on to the buoy and he/they were recovered by boat. In the RN they climbed back up the Chain to the focsle. I would think in legal useage that pier is ours.
                  Write a book.

                  Please.

                  Memories like that are precious and tell a tale of what life was like for your generation...
                  'History is a vast early warning system'. Norman Cousins

                  Comment


                  • €13.75 million euro would build a completely new modern building 120m X 30m X 3.5stories which would include
                    66 two-person rooms ensuite
                    two common/canteen areas per 30rooms.
                    2 X Laundrette facilities per 30 rooms
                    1 X Drying rooms with 60 lockers per 30 rooms
                    300 seat auditorium,
                    80 person office spaces,
                    Qty 10 X 15 person classrooms,
                    a library bigger than DFTC library,
                    a weights gym three times the size of the DFPES
                    A canteen space bigger than NMCI's
                    As well as reception hallway with accomodation office, reception toilets (male/female/disabled) etc and 130 kit lockers

                    All this was done in another EU military base with labour costs double that of Ireland.

                    Comment


                    • If we can talk about buying a new ship, 2 X CN295, 3 X PC-12Ms, Mowag upgrades etc, then we can talk about putting one of these buildings in McKee, Curragh, Naval Base, Cork, Galway.

                      Comment


                      • Oh forgot. It was built and fitted out and put into use in less than 24 months.

                        The DF could literally call up the architect, order a copy and paste version of the building and put it in several barracks around the country.
                        Last edited by TangoSierra; 1 June 2020, 14:47.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by TangoSierra View Post
                          €13.75 million euro would build a completely new modern building 120m X 30m X 3.5stories which would include
                          66 two-person rooms ensuite
                          two common/canteen areas per 30rooms.
                          2 X Laundrette facilities per 30 rooms
                          1 X Drying rooms with 60 lockers per 30 rooms
                          300 seat auditorium,
                          80 person office spaces,
                          Qty 10 X 15 person classrooms,
                          a library bigger than DFTC library,
                          a weights gym three times the size of the DFPES
                          A canteen space bigger than NMCI's
                          As well as reception hallway with accomodation office, reception toilets (male/female/disabled) etc and 130 kit lockers

                          All this was done in another EU military base with labour costs double that of Ireland.
                          Source?

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by TangoSierra View Post
                            €13.75 million euro would build a completely new modern building 120m X 30m X 3.5stories which would include
                            66 two-person rooms ensuite
                            two common/canteen areas per 30rooms.
                            2 X Laundrette facilities per 30 rooms
                            1 X Drying rooms with 60 lockers per 30 rooms
                            300 seat auditorium,
                            80 person office spaces,
                            Qty 10 X 15 person classrooms,
                            a library bigger than DFTC library,
                            a weights gym three times the size of the DFPES
                            A canteen space bigger than NMCI's
                            As well as reception hallway with accomodation office, reception toilets (male/female/disabled) etc and 130 kit lockers

                            All this was done in another EU military base with labour costs double that of Ireland.
                            Great to see the relative breakdown of what you are getting for the expenditure... thanks for that....
                            "Well, stone me! We've had cocaine, bribery and Arsenal scoring two goals at home. But just when you thought there were truly no surprises left in football, Vinnie Jones turns out to be an international player!" (Jimmy Greaves)!"

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Truck Driver View Post
                              Great to see the relative breakdown of what you are getting for the expenditure... thanks for that....
                              The History of State building is littered with expensive choices and buildings not yet finished. I like the EU package, it is exactly what is need in 2020. Even Murphy's communal Building proposal last year would be better then rebuilding Victoriana as dimensional strictures apply. I was wondering where the sewerage take-up will be at block 8 to cope with 80 healthy bowels.

                              Comment


                              • Is the DoD hamstrung by it's protection of historic structures? Is it reluctant to modify anything lest it face criticism for erasing history?
                                I was reminded of this seeing the virtual tours of various state owned buildings.

                                Griffith and Clancy were both absolute kips. When they were sold, lo and behold the developers were able to convert the existing structures into modern comfortable buildings. Beggars Bush, the HQ for most troops involved in dealing with the rebels in 1916, is a modern building housing the National Print museum, and in a modern building within, GSI. Dublin Castle, another relic of 1916, now houses the Revenue Commissioners amongst others. Yet they don't shiver in cells once used by the RIC. Modern office buildings stand alongside the protected structures, whose interiors have been upgraded to a modern civilised standard.
                                The Garda training college was a former Army Barracks, for a long time shared with a reserve unit. As soon as the GS was able to kick the DF to a quiet corner of this "historic" building, the OPW were able to turn the standard issue army accom block, same as that seen in Collins Barracks Cork (or Dublin), Athlone, Limerick or any DF property, into Bright modern offices and single accommodation.
                                The DoD seem to be afraid to gut a solid built structure and refit it, less they remove some historic toilet graffiti.
                                How long did the apprentices in Naas tolerate third world conditions in Devoy, until the facility closed, and the OPW happily bulldozed the entire place, to make room for Kildare Co Council offices.

                                If we removed the emotional attachment to our old buildings, could we have a better standard of accomodation? Is it time to knock the 3 and 4 story blocks built in Victorian times looking onto the parade square, and replace everything with fit for purpose offices, single accom and training rooms?
                                I am thinking of one historic structure, destroyed by fire in 2007 or thereabouts in Haulbowline. Block 4 used to be a storeroom for random things, as well as offices for what became the Halpin Centre. It cannot be used for anything now, as the fire damaged the structural integrity of the limestone. A steel frame now stops it from falling down. It joins other buildings in the same place destroyed by fire, where money spent maning it safe from falling over would be better spent rebuilding something identical in size and shape on the footprint, except with modern energy efficient design, and luxuries such as hot and cold running water, functioning toilets, windows that open or close and enough electrical outlets for everyone. A modern building might not cost so much on routine maintenance either.
                                It can be done. In the early 90s, the entirety of Married Quarters in Collins barracks Cork, along with what once were old stables that had been repurposed as workshops/offices were bulldozed, and replaced with a modern dining block, Gym and Base workshops. Unfortunately the Married quarters were never replaced but this was a local solution to the issue of overholders, which still blights the Curragh today.
                                The DoD and the DF are not museum curators. They should not have to work in or with buildings and equipment that belong in or as a museum. It is ironic that we have such emotional attachment to buildings that the founders of the state spent so much time trying to destroy.

                                Comment

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