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  • Comms in UNIFIL

    It probably wouldn't have been allowed under the mandate, considering I heard SINCGARS wasn't allowed.

  • #2
    I wonder it that was vetoed so as to leave the UN at a permanent disadvantage (or am I too cynical?)
    'He died who loved to live,' they'll say,
    'Unselfishly so we might have today!'
    Like hell! He fought because he had to fight;
    He died that's all. It was his unlucky night.
    http://www.salamanderoasis.org/poems...nnis/luck.html

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    • #3
      What I heard was the Israelis wouldn't allow it.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by DeV View Post
        It probably wouldn't have been allowed under the mandate, considering I heard SINCGARS wasn't allowed.
        Is it an army myth or did the radio ops speak in gaelic to get around the lack of secure comms ? Apolgies for going off thread
        Every man thinks meanly of himself for not having been a soldier - Samuel Johnson

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        • #5
          Originally posted by knocker View Post
          Is it an army myth or did the radio ops speak in gaelic to get around the lack of secure comms ? Apolgies for going off thread

          The Israeli's had a number of Irish lads at any one time doing there bit for the

          "promised land" to translate if needed

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          • #6
            They did in the Congo anyway, which I believe was countered by the opposition using Irish speakers to listen in.
            "Attack your attic with a Steyr....as seen on the Late Late Show..."

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            • #7
              If memory serves, when SINCGAR was first intrpoduced the Israelis vetoed its use in the Leb for security reasons .

              Saying that as the guy who instructed me on it pointed out , since the yanks retained the codes for all the sets they could easily provides them to the israelis if requested
              Anyone need a spleen ?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by knocker View Post
                Is it an army myth or did the radio ops speak in gaelic to get around the lack of secure comms ? Apolgies for going off thread
                I did 6 trips, 5 with Sigs and only on one occasion did I hear a message passed in Irish on the net.

                A cable phone system was maintained throughout the BN AO. The Bn Hq had an SB-86/P switchboard to which were connected the Company HQ's and all offices and positions in HQ Coy. There was also 2 microwave phone links to UNIFIL HQ connected to it.

                The Company HQ,s each had a smalller switchboard SB 22 http://www.mavin.com/pdf/sb22_pt_por...board%2520.pdf which was connected to OP,s in the Coy AO. In some cases it was not possible to run lines to OP.s.

                Phone comms were also regarded as insecure.

                Rear link comms to Ireland were in general sent by a HF teleprinter link without encryption.

                When needed encryption on this link was available.

                Apolgies for going off thread
                B Inman
                Sergeant Major
                Last edited by B Inman; 19 January 2011, 01:10.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by sofa View Post
                  The Israeli's had a number of Irish lads at any one time doing there bit for the

                  "promised land" to translate if needed
                  we had the same thing in Northern Ireland
                  RGJ

                  ...Once a Rifleman - Always a Rifleman... Celer et Audax

                  The Rifles

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RoyalGreenJacket View Post
                    we had the same thing in Northern Ireland
                    Well, I can guarantee I wasn't one of them! (F in the Leaving Cert! )
                    'He died who loved to live,' they'll say,
                    'Unselfishly so we might have today!'
                    Like hell! He fought because he had to fight;
                    He died that's all. It was his unlucky night.
                    http://www.salamanderoasis.org/poems...nnis/luck.html

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I am truly mystified how it was possible to get an F in the LC!!! I never opened an irish book in all the years in school and still managed to get a B in pass irish!
                      Everyone who's ever loved you was wrong.

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                      • #12
                        i got a C in the Inter-Cert in Irish but when i was in COP in NI we did some really close 'end of the garden' surveillance on a target and he would only ever speak in Irish when others came to meet him although we heard him talking to his wife in English.

                        my Boss moved me into the OP to glean what i could out of the conversations in Irish. i couldn't understand a lot of it but we did get some key information that the British lads would have missed, so it came in handy after all and the army were able to exploit my basics in Irish.

                        after that we used listening devices and sent the convo's to G2 for analysis.
                        RGJ

                        ...Once a Rifleman - Always a Rifleman... Celer et Audax

                        The Rifles

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by The real Jack View Post
                          I am truly mystified how it was possible to get an F in the LC!!! I never opened an irish book in all the years in school and still managed to get a B in pass irish!
                          I went one better - I didn't open the exam paper either!
                          'He died who loved to live,' they'll say,
                          'Unselfishly so we might have today!'
                          Like hell! He fought because he had to fight;
                          He died that's all. It was his unlucky night.
                          http://www.salamanderoasis.org/poems...nnis/luck.html

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Flamingo View Post
                            I went one better - I didn't open the exam paper either!
                            So gathering and collating int

                            we now know that those who dont do well in State Exams join the British Army

                            In my trips to the Leb- we never spoke Irish. the main radio traffic was what was know as

                            reporting sheets- these would either be move reps- shoot reps- inc reps etc.

                            they were broken into various categories and numbers were used for simplicity

                            e.g. an MBT was a 1 by 5 ( If I remember correctly) a half track was a 1 by 4

                            2 MBT's were 2 by 5 etc etc-

                            If we had need to send messages of a more confidential nature then we had

                            slidex and griddle etc etc.

                            The Israelis had Irish people working in South Lebanon- lads doing their national service

                            I remember giving a lad a whole load of Irish Papers and chatting to him about the National

                            League and how the Dubs were doing- he was an IDF Captain who did 3 months service every

                            summer.

                            btw that was all pre sincgar days
                            Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
                            Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
                            The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere***
                            The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
                            The best lack all conviction, while the worst
                            Are full of passionate intensity.

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                            • #15
                              I didn't say I didn't do well - just that I didn't do well in Irish! It didn't stop me gaining the qualifications I wanted, and I can honestly say that it has had zero effect on my subsequent career!

                              (Anyway, I was TA - it wasn't a career choice, more of a hobby!)
                              'He died who loved to live,' they'll say,
                              'Unselfishly so we might have today!'
                              Like hell! He fought because he had to fight;
                              He died that's all. It was his unlucky night.
                              http://www.salamanderoasis.org/poems...nnis/luck.html

                              Comment

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