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Roles of the Infantry

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  • DeV
    replied
    UNTSI (UN Training School Ireland) is a DF establishment not a UN one.

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  • eelmonster
    Soldier of Misfortune

  • eelmonster
    replied
    Originally posted by California Tanker
    Isn't there one in Sweden as well? I'll bet that one's more popular in summer than the Curragh is... (All those Swedish bikini babes... )

    NTM
    swedish bikini babes, yah

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  • California Tanker
    My tank is bigger...

  • California Tanker
    replied
    un has its international training school in ireland of all countries
    Isn't there one in Sweden as well? I'll bet that one's more popular in summer than the Curragh is... (All those Swedish bikini babes... )

    NTM

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  • Guest
    Guest

  • ldman60119
    Guest replied
    I have never said no one on this board beside me has seen combat. If you are on a UN mission and you are under fire, you are in combat. The US Army has much to work on as far as comabt training goes. Please re-read my post if you do not understand my views. Thank You
    Guest
    Guest
    Last edited by Guest; 14 December 2005, 23:06.

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  • X-RayOne
    Lieutenant

  • X-RayOne
    replied
    unfortunately, idman has shown a completely dismissive attitude to any other view in this thread. and quite a limited view as to the roles of infantry in today's military/political climate.

    it is also quite offensive for him to suggest that "it is really a waste of time trying to explain it ( a combat mentality ) to anyone who hasn't been over there". as somebady else has already said he is not the only one on this board that has been under fire, in a fire-fight and so on. indeed, it can be harder at times being under fire on UN peace support missions where you cannot protect yourself, return fire due to political restraints, ROE, etc. ultimately, if someone is shooting at you the effect is the same, whether in a war zone or peace support mission.

    all through his posts, Idman has discussed poor training and leadership as the reasons why infantry skills are degraded. perhaps he should look inward and examine these areas more closely within his army. as i've said before maybe it is time for the US to look at a broader set of roles for its infantry units. instead of leaving these units poorly prepared for peace support "hearts and minds"stuff in the time between war-fighting phases and the civil affairs units taking over. maybe look to the BA to see how they do it.

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  • hptmurphy
    Commander in Chief

  • hptmurphy
    replied
    So who is taking the moral high ground on this..the infantry man who goes to fight and enforce the will of his governement...or the peacekeeper who goes to protect and serve those who are unable to do it them selves.

    Irelands particpation in UN missions has to been to go to an area that somebody else has given up trying to govern and war has occured. the Us seems to like the rules as it goes along..then throws the UN a few quid to help clear its conscience.

    Remember that the invasion of Iraq did not have a solid mandate and the very contries who deemed Iraq to be an axis of eveil are now bemoaning their losses...both inside and out side military organisations.

    The conflict in the balkans began ever before anybody understood US policy and continued into a world conflict. Notice how without an early intervention by the US this conflict escalated on its on....Moal of the story being...you don't need America to have a war...but you can be damned sure they will stick their noses in at some point.

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  • apod
    Commander in Chief

  • apod
    replied
    I cant believe that idman has the nerve to come on here and lecture about pso duties.
    ireland is one of the most respected countries in the world when it comes to pso.Our record speaks for itself.The un has its international training school in ireland of all countries.And whenever a new mission comes up ireland is allways at the top of the list.
    I wonder why??? Maybe its because an irish soldier is not a robot and can actually talk to people and diffuse situations instead of going for a weapon straight away.Having said that the big stick behind the back helps.Whwere were the U.s troops when it came to Liberia?
    A country founded by former slaves?I'll tell you.On an aircraft carrier sailing home after conducting an NEO and then hi-tailing it.Body bag factor and all that.
    Compare that to irelands contribution,where we were the first western european nation to commit troops and the mission has been so succesfull that the un is using it as a model for all future peace enforcement ops.
    Yes i agree that peacekeeping sucks .It makes a soldier impotent in his or her job as your hands are tied together by restrictive rules of engagement.I.e rwanda,unprofor etc.
    Ireland has started moving towards moere peace enforcement missions and i believe that is the way to go.
    "pecekeeping is a job unsuited to soldiers,but is a job only sodiers can do".

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  • JAG
    replied
    Originally posted by Goldie fish
    Irish troops were in Somalia, remember? UNISOM?


    And it worked so well for the BA in S Armagh...
    A: Transport company, was it not?

    B: Apparrantly the sole reason for the continuing IRA ceasfire was the success of the BA in South Armagh. And therefore the sole reason police patrols in Northern Ireland are no longer required to have twice as many soldiers as police officers.

    Leave a comment:


  • JAG
    replied
    Originally posted by Goldie fish
    Do you seriously think Bosnia couldhave been solved by going around and killing all the Bosnians?
    The Bosnian civil war ended because NATO (i.e Bill Clinton) started bombing the Bosnian Serbs, forcing them into a truce and territorial/political division of Bosnia Herzegovina. Which continues to hold.

    The Kosovan War ended by reason of three months of bombardment by NATO (i.e Bill Clinto & Tony Blair) forcing Yugoslavia/Serbia into a truce, which continues to hold.

    Kosovo has some 40,000 heavily armed NATO troops keeping the peace, and some Russians. How many thousands of heavily armed NATO troops remain in Bosnia?

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  • Guest
    Guest

  • ldman60119
    Guest replied
    As the topkick for my unit, I did everything from kicking doors down to writing letters home. For 2 months after our company XO was killed, I was the XO. We lost three of the Platoon LTs and SGTs were running them. The CC told the officer that was left to listen to what I said. We then got a fresh supply of LTs and we all fell back to our original roles

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  • ex pat 007
    airborne daddy

  • ex pat 007
    replied
    I suppose its up to the PSG, my PL was very much a tactical leader while the PSG was more into the logistical side of things (as well as running the CCP).

    A friend of mine described his PSG as essentially an OC ( obsever controller/Umpire for force on force exercise) with live ammo, he was around a lot but didnt really do anything usefull.

    Tactical units can and do have strategic effects, but you are correct of course and MDMP was perhaps the wrong terminolgy to use.
    ex pat 007
    airborne daddy
    Last edited by ex pat 007; 14 December 2005, 00:57. Reason: PSG as OC

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  • California Tanker
    My tank is bigger...

  • California Tanker
    replied
    In fairness, PSGs can usually be found in the thick of things. First Sergeants much less so.

    MDMP is considered to be a staff-level course, for Majors and so on. It's touched upon on the Captain's course, but generally you don't deal with it until Command and Staff.
    It's a much higher level affair than tactical decision-making.

    NTM
    California Tanker
    My tank is bigger...
    Last edited by California Tanker; 13 December 2005, 23:46.

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  • ex pat 007
    airborne daddy

  • ex pat 007
    replied
    Originally posted by combatlogo
    Lighten up, Francis. You´re not the only one here to have been in combat.

    “Any of you guys call me Francis, and I'll kill ya.”
    "Now any of you homos touch me, and I'll kill ya.”

    Canadian and Dutch wings are simply bad form , one MUST have Irish wings ---ZING !!!

    The problems of the Conventional US Army are manifest in your postings Idman, one must build rapport before explaining to the natives how f@cked up they are. Observe them for a time - make friends and then try to lead them to your way of thinking (while collecting a sizeable per diem)

    Speaking of combat, what role does a 1st Sgt or platoon Sgt really play in it? Youre not exactly in the stack and bustng down doors are you? My 1st Shirt was assh@le deep in paperwork and logistics I still dont know what the f@#k my Plt Sgt was for.

    Originally posted by ldman60119
    sit back and then tell me how wrong I really am.
    Ok, youre wrong, I feel the experiences of my tour in Kosovo helped mold me into the modest Uber Ninja of today. Peacekeeping or Peace enforcement has the troops away from the flagpole and the tediums of garrison duty (like avoiding 1st Sgts and SGMs) and conducting operations at the squad and platoon level.This gives junior leaders the ability to plan and lead missions themselves and(shock horror) make decisions.Combat is not about reacting to ambush and firing up "known and suspected" enemy positions.Its about being situationally aware, understanding the effect of your actions (or inaction) processing info and deciding on a course of action(MDMP??).

    It is possible to discuss the role of the infantry with those who are lucky enough to not have recieved their baptism by fire, they do it every day in Fort Benning and Fort Bragg

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  • eelmonster
    Soldier of Misfortune

  • eelmonster
    replied
    a college friend of mine had a friend in the NY NG serving as 2ndlt, he morbidly checked the casualty lists daily. i do feel for the guys there just doing there job.

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  • Guest
    Guest

  • ldman60119
    Guest replied
    The 69th Infantry Reigment (fighting 69th) is now part of the New York National Guard and the 42nd Infantry Division (which I belong to). Most of the memeber are not Irish anymore. The 69th was in Iraq till a few months ago.

    Yellow is still the CAVs color.
    Guest
    Guest
    Last edited by Guest; 13 December 2005, 21:52.

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