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Replacement NSR Launch / New NS Port Security Launches

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  • ancientmariner
    replied
    Originally posted by Auldsod View Post
    I think we are sweating a lot on the technical details of these MLs but to echo A/TEL, the real to the NS and NSR will be in their utility.

    Due to the sheer size of the investment, this is going to be a massive shot in the arm into all of the NSR units. The units have a fantastic opportunity ahead but they have to step up. There is no doubt that there will have to be much initial support and continuing support from the PDF here as these expensive assets cannot simply be not left idle when they arrive.

    The Cork based ML will receive extensive use as A/TEL states but there will need to a lot of engagement with the other three boats. Personally, I'm very optimistic about the years ahead.
    The operation , Base facilities, secure berthing, and access for NSR members will be important. They will need a continuum of NS housekeeping to ensure readiness and "good to go ". Ideally they should work once a year, at least, as a flotilla . The operation of assembling as a Flotilla needs to be provided for by considering boat haulage companies.

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  • Auldsod
    replied
    I think we are sweating a lot on the technical details of these MLs but to echo A/TEL, the real to the NS and NSR will be in their utility.

    Due to the sheer size of the investment, this is going to be a massive shot in the arm into all of the NSR units. The units have a fantastic opportunity ahead but they have to step up. There is no doubt that there will have to be much initial support and continuing support from the PDF here as these expensive assets cannot simply be not left idle when they arrive.

    The Cork based ML will receive extensive use as A/TEL states but there will need to a lot of engagement with the other three boats. Personally, I'm very optimistic about the years ahead.

    Leave a comment:


  • A/TEL
    replied
    Originally posted by batterysgt View Post
    Any thing come of this yet. Must be the single biggest investment in the RDF.
    Safe to say that the Cork based boat will be used extensively by the NS for diving ops, Officer Nav training and for security taskings for visiting warships.

    Useful asset to have in HB

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    Originally posted by batterysgt View Post
    Any thing come of this yet. Must be the single biggest investment in the RDF.
    Tenders being accepted until end of this week, if I recall correctly. (Just checked, all bids must be in by Noon on 20th May)
    Everything will be silent until after they are opened.
    Last edited by na grohmiti; 18 May 2021, 01:47.

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  • batterysgt
    replied
    Any thing come of this yet. Must be the single biggest investment in the RDF.

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  • ancientmariner
    replied
    Originally posted by Ex-Boeing Driver View Post
    SafeMarine offer in my opinion vessels for a Commercial Operator. Considering the Sea States frequently encountered around ALL of the Irish Coastlines around the year it therefore should be the case that any craft for INS Reserve or INS use / deployment in whatever role or for what duration / distance/range will be suitable for role .Historically the people that have vast experience of these craft are the RNLI , German Navy ( ie : Patrol Craft ) , Swedish Navy, Finnish Navy , Norway .We need to prioritise Sea -Keeping /Survivability if operating up to 40nm offshore , also crew safety and comfort , take into account the shock/ acceleration / impact stresses on the human body in a seaway on a relatively small craft .In essence the leaders in this field are I think the RNLI and their purpose built craft .It would not be a giant leap to use one of their designs and evolve it to a military spec.
    In essence that is exactly where we need to concentrate and to visualise offshore and weather unpredictability. I remember being on a ship that was classified for operation in wind force 6 or below and being caught out in Storm 10/11 off Mine Head for almost 24 hours. No doubt with their connections Safmarine could produce the boat type required concentrating on short range Naval Duties and Training as outlined in the RFT but mostly with a high degree of survivability and subdivision of watertight compartments.

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  • Ex-Boeing Driver
    replied
    SafeMarine offer in my opinion vessels for a Commercial Operator. Considering the Sea States frequently encountered around ALL of the Irish Coastlines around the year it therefore should be the case that any craft for INS Reserve or INS use / deployment in whatever role or for what duration / distance/range will be suitable for role .Historically the people that have vast experience of these craft are the RNLI , German Navy ( ie : Patrol Craft ) , Swedish Navy, Finnish Navy , Norway .We need to prioritise Sea -Keeping /Survivability if operating up to 40nm offshore , also crew safety and comfort , take into account the shock/ acceleration / impact stresses on the human body in a seaway on a relatively small craft .In essence the leaders in this field are I think the RNLI and their purpose built craft .It would not be a giant leap to use one of their designs and evolve it to a military spec.
    Last edited by Ex-Boeing Driver; 24 April 2021, 01:17.

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    Here is the makers own video of sea trials.

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    Originally posted by EUFighter View Post

    It could be also based on the bigger Wildcat 53 as the dimensions match almost exactly.

    https://www.safehavenmarine.com/wildcat-53-hydrographic
    Actually, yes now you mention it. I was on that vessel during her sea trials. An unbelievably stable platform. For those who do not have great sea legs, this is the boat for you. This is another of the same type, With an elevated helm position (2 seats) equipped with jet drive instead of rudder.
    Otherwise a fantastic vessel. Apologies for music. Youtube replaced the original audio (which had a copyright issue) with that crap.

    Leave a comment:


  • EUFighter
    replied
    Originally posted by na grohmiti View Post
    Someone on Boards.ie just posted this.
    Reading the specs it's like the tender was reverse engineered around it.
    SAFEHAVEN MARINE LAUNCH (safehavenmarineold.com)


    It could be also based on the bigger Wildcat 53 as the dimensions match almost exactly.

    https://www.safehavenmarine.com/wildcat-53-hydrographic

    Leave a comment:


  • ancientmariner
    replied
    Originally posted by na grohmiti View Post
    The RFT suggest the classification here will be for P5 Passenger vessel.


    Special Service craft doesn't seem to enter into it. In land terms it's a hilux with a machine gun.
    We are in deep doo-doo if we stick with Class P 5 exclusively as the vessel will have to be in smooth waters. Even in the case of P3 you are restricted to 3 miles offshore and not more than 15 miles from your departure point. Classes 1 to 5 are for trips around the harbour and not for 40miles offshore for up to 48 hours. take a look at the 20 Tonne 15m craft built for Defence of Admiralty harbours and add some time durability to them with facilities for up to 10/12 POB's. In the overall if the RFT is calling for Classification then you are talking Lloyds and their inspectors or a similar society. Yards do that all the time. In my opinion a P5 boat stays in the box.

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    The RFT suggest the classification here will be for P5 Passenger vessel.
    The vessel design must be class appropriate and the vessel must be constructed in accordance with class rules. The vessel will be classified to P5 passenger License requirements. This is governed under Ireland’s Statutory Instrument: S.I. No. 273 of 2002 Merchant Shipping (Passenger Boat) regulations 2005. The vessel will be surveyed during the build and outfitting phase and on completion by an independent agent appointed by the Naval Service. Where the requirements of the Naval Service specification contained herein, is conflicting with P5 passenger Licence requirements, P5 passenger licence will be followed. Any conflict or necessary changes are to be discussed in detail with the Naval Services Project Manager.
    Special Service craft doesn't seem to enter into it. In land terms it's a hilux with a machine gun.
    2. These vessels will be used in a variety of roles and should provide a versatile and adaptable platform to enable the completion of certain operational tasking’s including but not limited to:
    i. Maritime Security Operations.
    ii. Port Security Operations.
    iii. Limited Diving Support.
    iv. Limited Underwater Surveys

    3. Each vessel shall be built to Class P5 and be in compliance to the following International regulations:

    i. The International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, and its protocol of 1978 and articles, annexes and certificates.

    ii. Merchant Shipping (Passenger Boat) regulations 2002.

    iii. International Telecommunications Convention, 1973 and Radio Regulations, 1974 including GMDSS rules for Area Code A1

    iv. IEC 60092 Electrical Installations in Ships and BS 8450:2006 Code of Practice on the Installation of Electrical and Electronic Equipment on Ships

    v. European Parliament and the Council of the European Union (2002) Directive 2002/44/EC on the minimum health and safety requirements regarding the exposure of workers to the risks arising from physical agents (vibration).

    vi. The colour coding and direction of flow in the pipes to conform to ISO 14726-1

    vii. Latest IMO Performance Standards for Navigation Equipment

    viii. The vessel to be constructed to and fitted out with material compliant with current marine regulations.

    ix. A full set of Classification Society certificates shall be required by the NS covering all aspects of the build and equipment
    4. Second user hulls built to Class and are identical in structure and layout will be considered. These must have all past maintenance records available. Any second user hulls not built to P5 Class, under current legislation will require a survey undertaken by the Irish Marine Surveyors Office assessment to ensure they are capable of being class compliant. ​​​​​​​

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  • ancientmariner
    replied
    Originally posted by ancientmariner View Post

    I'm lost on P 5 , however it is standard practice for all yards to build to a RULES STANDARD and keep the vessel under RULES until all matters of Guarantee and any Insurances required for Guarantee have been met and finalised. Once guarantee is over( could be more than one year but probably not more than five ) the State carries it's own insurance.
    Both Classification and Technical papers cover extensively the construction of special services craft, including naval craft built from composite material. I was interested in the hull weight differences between suitable steel and a composite material. A committee paper mentions that a 52m patrol craft of steel weighs 114T and a similar craft of GRP weighs 72T. In extrapolation I believe the MOST that a 15m craft could weigh, in GRP, would be 20/21 T but not 30 T. Lloyds notice No.6 on special craft, zeros in on WT integrity for shaft penetrations in both single and multihull vessels in their after section. They require a cofferdam system to contain leakage. The answer is build to Classification and associated plan approval and inspections.

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  • ancientmariner
    replied
    Originally posted by na grohmiti View Post

    What does our P5 say about such things? The RFT seems to be intentionally vague as to which classification society the build comes under.
    I'm lost on P 5 , however it is standard practice for all yards to build to a RULES STANDARD and keep the vessel under RULES until all matters of Guarantee and any Insurances required for Guarantee have been met and finalised. Once guarantee is over( could be more than one year but probably not more than five ) the State carries it's own insurance.

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    Originally posted by ancientmariner View Post
    In the issued RFT it is proposed that the Craft would operate up to 40nm offshore. This needs to be described in terms that will comply with RULES of an oversight organisation such as LLyods who do have Rules for construction of Patrol Craft of all types including naval patrol craft. German Llyod classify them as RSA 200, RSA50, RSA 20. and for harbours and approaches only. The RSA 50 allows for 50nm offshore and 50nm along the coastal region. If you wanted to go Dublin to Cork it would have to be in steps of 50nm and take some days . If the 40nm offshore is the limit what are the acceptable or compliant linear distances for inter port travel.?
    What does our P5 say about such things? The RFT seems to be intentionally vague as to which classification society the build comes under.

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