Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Flame Retardant Clothing aboard ship.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    have to diagree with the vapourisation bit.

    it would probably be true is somebody was exposed to temperatures like that and were just wearing normal clothes no doubt.

    fire kit will take the most of the heat before the body does though. remember a compartment fire can have ambient air temperatures of 300-400 degrees C and fire-fighters can perform rescues or firefight quitely safely in this enviroment because of their ppe.

    nowadays fire-fighters all use flashover hoods so no skin should be exposed when entering compartments on fire. but true, the earlobes were traditionally the way of recognising when things were getting too hot! thats only part of knowing when to back off nowadays.
    Fate whispers to the warrior, "There is a storm coming"

    And the warrior whispers back "I am the storm".

    Comment


    • #32
      Ah well having qualified with the CAA in the UK as a fireman in 1991 and having worked in that role for 6 years.....I am well aware of what operating temeperatures can be especially in enclosed spaces. Nobody in there right mind would enter a compartment at 700 degress c..as the first thing to melt would be the visor on your face..and then your lungs would boil.

      Boundary cooling is the only way to make such an envoirnement survivable along with a fog wall. But then again we are getting into the realms of firefighting rather than flash gear.

      Many of the older firefighters wouldn't wear the flash over hoods as it prevented them from using the bodies inbuilt safety system.

      Any way...its about Anti Flash gear..and not fire fighting....
      Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

      Comment


      • #33
        fair enough..... so are the navy hoods and gloves actually fire retardand or just heavy weight cotton.

        and has anybody had experience of them in a flash situation? how common are such situations?
        Fate whispers to the warrior, "There is a storm coming"

        And the warrior whispers back "I am the storm".

        Comment


        • #34
          Every time the bofors/OTO Melara/Rhein Metall/Gambo goes BOOM. The only variable is how close you are to the muzzle flash when it happens...

          A question not yet asked is why is it white? I am led to believe that this comes from days of steam, when dye would boil into the skin, when it came in contact with a blast of steam.
          Dye causes infections.


          Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

          Comment


          • #35
            White radiates or reflects heat better
            "The Question is not: how far you will take this? The Question is do you possess the constitution to go as far as is needed?"

            Comment


            • #36
              Correct...next time you visit a naval veesl just have a look in confined spaces and see how much of it is painted white..especially on Eithne round the aft alleyways..antiflash white...check out your own photos of the inside of the 57mm turret..guess what its white for a reason

              yeah the gear is just cotton now adays.....eons ago it was empregnated with ..wait for it..asbestos.....

              look at the inside of an AML ..its white for a good reason..QED....
              Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

              Comment


              • #37
                The silver suits airport firemen used to wear also contained asbestos

                Comment


                • #38
                  Nothing to do with anti flash gear.


                  Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
                    Nothing to do with anti flash gear.
                    I know. Neither has half the rest of the posts on this thread. I thought since the subject of fires on ships was being discussed, someone might be interested. My apologies.
                    'History is a vast early warning system'. Norman Cousins

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by ZULU View Post
                      Dryflo undergarments worn by US service personel in Iraq and Afghanistan was banned because of this. Their answere to dryflo was "underarmour". Medical personel had to cut into the muscle tissue to remove the fused synthetic fibre, destroying all chance of even a succesful skin graft over the area.

                      Anyway - Fire onboard = bad, very bad
                      The ban is a bit pointless, considering that both the uniforms and web gear contain synthetic materials and most personnel are wearing body armour over these t-shirts.
                      "The dolphins were monkeys that didn't like the land, walked back to the water, went back from the sand."

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        This is where the flash concepot comes in.......Flash while hot enot enought to melt light synthetic body hugging clothing is not intense or dosn't last long enough to effect heaveier garments such as webbing and body armour...or even boots.

                        I am glad to see the americans have picked up on the lessons learned. Close combat in closed up areas....inside vehicles....etc..synthetic clothing is a no no..especial when potentially exposed to flash type weapons..this might make it a little easier to explain..look at the smoke hood,,balaclava type head gear and nomex worn by special forces...same concept as naval antiflash gear..reduce the risk of serious burns which are considered hi risk in close quarters fighting...
                        Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Could the flash cause such clothing to burn if body armour is worn over it?
                          "The dolphins were monkeys that didn't like the land, walked back to the water, went back from the sand."

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            The problem isn't it burning, the problem is the material melting and fusing with skin. This doesn't require a direct flame, all it requires is heat. Body armour will stop a direct flame and keep out some heat, but it won't stop it all.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by FMolloy View Post
                              The ban is a bit pointless, considering that both the uniforms and web gear contain synthetic materials and most personnel are wearing body armour over these t-shirts.
                              The cotton t-shirts worn under the uniform is designed to scorch rather than melt.
                              "The Question is not: how far you will take this? The Question is do you possess the constitution to go as far as is needed?"

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                This is slightly off thread, but slightly relevant:

                                Before the BA in the North were issued body armour they used to wear flak jackets with both buttons and zips. The instruction went around that zips were not to be done up after serious injuries - if the jacket caught fire (eg petrol bombing) the zip would melt and they would be unable to take it off.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X