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War graves and the deceased.

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  • War graves and the deceased.

    Hi all
    I've been watching a few of the diving programes on various channels lately and a lot of the dives are on sunken Naval vessels, usually sunk in action.Naturally, a lot of the dive teams take care not to disturb the vessels , out of respect for the deceased. Often , they lay a wreath or a plaque on the wreck and leave it alone again.That seems to all very well but other prgrams feature fellows retrieving treasure from old galleons,etc, so, where does respect for the dead start and stop? I'm prompted to ask after having seen a documentary on Pearl Harbour, which showed the USN salvaging the USS Arizona, stripping it of guns and other usable items,thereafter leaving it as a monument to the fallen. Given that it had become a grave by virtue of being sunk with hundreds aboard, why would they salve it?...On a grimmer note, given that mortal flesh decays readily enough in the sea, what becomes of skeletal remains?
    regards
    GttC

  • #2
    The condition of the skelatal remains depends upon how deep they are at. In shallow waters 0-250m they do not last very long (2-3years if that). This is due to gaseous expansion in the bone and flesh due to decay and enevitable floatation. The stress on the bone due to microbubbles and organism infection cause it to become brittle. The body becomes disarticulated and broken up further when included in coastal erosion medium (sand, shale, rocks)

    In deeper water (500m +) the ambient pressure is enough to keep the gaseous build up during decay below positive bouyancy. The flesh is eaten away and the bones with out floatation are generally undisturbed. Some whale carcasses have been dated up to 20 years in deep water.

    Found a cow skelaton once when divng down near hook head.

    In regards maritime graves. If there is enough money involved, some will not care at all that hundreds of people died on the site.
    "The Question is not: how far you will take this? The Question is do you possess the constitution to go as far as is needed?"

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ZULU View Post
      The condition of the skelatal remains depends upon how deep they are at. In shallow waters 0-250m they do not last very long (2-3years if that). This is due to gaseous expansion in the bone and flesh due to decay and enevitable floatation. The stress on the bone due to microbubbles and organism infection cause it to become brittle. The body becomes disarticulated and broken up further when included in coastal erosion medium (sand, shale, rocks)
      You are giving me the willies.

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