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Stern Launching & Recovery of RIBs

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  • #16
    I don't see how it could require any less crew than the Single point launch. Its definitely not quicker to recover boats by the stern ramp. There are many types of side davits. You need to be more specific. The irish Navy uses a mix of Effer(Hiab) cranes and Caley davits. The Peacocks use a crane not unlike the Effer in principle, but it does not stow as tidily. An Afterthought on the Part of the RN perhaps.
    In the past, Nationwide had a clip of the Customs cutter using the Stern Launched RIB on the Suirbheir. However since they rejigged their website, the link I had no longer works. http://www.rte.ie/news/2004/0628/nationwide.html
    Caley Davit Animation.
    http://www.caley.co.uk/Pages/flashdavit.html


    Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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    • #17
      I had a video clip on my phone of the Customs boyos getting up the ramp while tied alongside the pier in Crosshaven. They had trouble aligning the bow when the boat was stationary!!! Now this could have been new crew being trained, but from what I saw, even with expierenced crew, their going to have one shot at it.

      The advantages of side davits are this.

      The tender can position itself on the lee side in rough weather.

      If their is a strong swell being in line and moving harmonicly with the ship is safer, more predictable rythnm

      You can attach a forward anchor point and get towed along reducing the steering requirement by the tender

      Stern ramp would be over the most turbulent flow of water coming from the props.
      Totally unpredictable flow
      Immense pressure on the outboard given turbulent eddies
      Only one shot at the ramp
      Stern lift coupled with a drive forward by the rib would probably see the rib in under the props
      "The Question is not: how far you will take this? The Question is do you possess the constitution to go as far as is needed?"

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      • #18
        I thought the point of the stern ramp was for launches whilst underway i.e. not signalling your intent by heaving to and swining a davit out etc. recovery would then be from a stationary position?

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        • #19
          You can launch RIB while underway too.

          There's merits for and against both systems. Either way in rough seas its going to be difficult
          "The Question is not: how far you will take this? The Question is do you possess the constitution to go as far as is needed?"

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          • #20
            Experts.....try a fractured spine...with all it entails....boats conditions ..crews..loading.....yup...

            Yes suppose I'm an expert...

            now what was the question?
            Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

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            • #21
              final word?

              Found an extended version of that USCG report on stern ramp RIB deployment operations,

              http://www.skibstekniskselskab.dk/do...TC/B2(O21).pdf

              It's interesting because it describes in detail the operational procedures used on a number of vessels to deploy and recover RIBs using stern ramps. Also has a photo and some diagrams.

              Anyway, that's as much as I know about it... Just thought it was something that should be looked at, for the future.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by carrington View Post
                Found an extended version of that USCG report on stern ramp RIB deployment operations,

                http://www.skibstekniskselskab.dk/do...TC/B2(O21).pdf
                Thanks for that link Carrington. Makes for very informative reading.

                However I did notice the report stating

                Most of the recovery procedures were nearly identical. The coxswain must time the boat’s entrance into the ramp to coincide with the sill’s greatest submergence. When the coxswain sees an opportunity, he accelerates the FRC into the transom opening and up the ramp. The winch line is passed to the bowman who attaches it to the FRC, and the FRC is then winched up the ramp to the stowed position.
                Which has the disadvantages that I stated in my previous post

                Stern ramp would be over the most turbulent flow of water coming from the props.
                Totally unpredictable flow
                Immense pressure on the outboard given turbulent eddies
                Only one shot at the ramp
                Stern lift coupled with a drive forward by the rib would probably see the rib in under the props
                "The Question is not: how far you will take this? The Question is do you possess the constitution to go as far as is needed?"

                Comment


                • #23
                  Orla RIB launch

                  For info., article in Winter 2004 issue of 'Signal' re LE Orla, including pic. of RIB launch:

                  http://www.raco.ie/signalpdfs/3_2_onpatrol.pdf

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Good link. whats your point?


                    Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      informative

                      Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
                      Good link. whats your point?
                      I thought the picture of the RIB launch would be of interest to non-sailors reading this thread.

                      Seems to be a lot of people in that picture - are they all involved in the procedure, or just spectators?

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                      • #26
                        Perhaps(and I'm sure you already know the answer) they are waiting to embark aboard the RIB as they are according to the caption a boarding party?

                        Also the Gantry on the P40 class were enherited from the British. The More modern system is far simpler.
                        Your service to non sailors is admirable. My first launch was as an oarsman from hand cranked gravity davits...the "backup" engine was operated by a "mechanic" and the rudder by a "helmsman". Happy days. Tales of welts and "oars!"


                        Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          safe manning?

                          Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
                          Perhaps(and I'm sure you already know the answer) they are waiting to embark aboard the RIB as they are according to the caption a boarding party?

                          Also the Gantry on the P40 class were enherited from the British. The More modern system is far simpler.
                          Your service to non sailors is admirable. My first launch was as an oarsman from hand cranked gravity davits...the "backup" engine was operated by a "mechanic" and the rudder by a "helmsman". Happy days. Tales of welts and "oars!"

                          There are two people in the boat already, and nine others looking on. That RIB looks like it could only accommodate another three or four max.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            For those who think it's easy coming up the stern of a moving vessel. This was taken from a 30ft boat on a calm day, of the Local coast guard on Ex


                            "The Question is not: how far you will take this? The Question is do you possess the constitution to go as far as is needed?"

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              recovery procedure

                              Any videos of actual stern recovery? According to the US Coast Guard study, the most common operational practice is for the 'mother' ship to slow to 5-6 knots and head into the waves, or slightly off, for launch and recovery.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                http://www.rte.ie/news/2004/0628/nat...46175,null,200


                                Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

                                Comment

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