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Irish Navy Distress

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  • Irish Navy Distress

    Just wondering if any Irish Navy ships have ever gotten into difficulty at sea?

  • #2
    Define "difficulty"? I can think of a few incidents that stand out. The Damage caused to Roisin on her way to assist the Canadian Sub.The Fire in Aislings Engine room for example. The Fire in the Boiler room of one of the Corvettes, the sweeper that ran aground. Yet in all these cases, the training of the crews prevented the incedents from becoming tragedies.


    Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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    • #3
      Eithne had two fires in one week....does that count? and it was in the middle of an operational deployment.
      Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

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      • #4
        Originally posted by hptmurphy View Post
        Eithne had two fires in one week....does that count? and it was in the middle of an operational deployment.
        they would normally sort the problem out themselves??

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        • #5
          So it can be quite a common thing to have an emergency on a ship?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by moggy View Post
            they would normally sort the problem out themselves??
            well, if you've got a fire while at sea the local fire brigade aren't gonna be much help!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by theseaghost View Post
              So it can be quite a common thing to have an emergency on a ship?

              Again you need to define what you mean by "emergency". A simple event such as an engine breakdown can become a disaster in minutes depending on how you deal with it. A cable snapping while berthing can become a tragedy depending on who is in the way when it snaps. Crewmen suffering from what would be considered minor injuries at home, could be at risk of death from the same injury at sea.

              Be clearer about what you are asking.


              Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by theseaghost View Post
                So it can be quite a common thing to have an emergency on a ship?
                The two major ones are FIRE and FLOODING reactions and training come into play big time and must be practised, as for the rest of things a small thing ashore could be serious at sea a fine example would be a burst appendix....

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Rooster View Post
                  well, if you've got a fire while at sea the local fire brigade aren't gonna be much help!
                  Yes they will, Rooster. The local fire brigade is already on board. All the crews are trained in fire fighting and in particular 'Hot Fire' training. This includes BA (breathing aperatus), the use of waterwall, boundry cooling, rescue, evacuation, containment, communications, shoreing and other practices.

                  Each ship has a number of areas called 'Damage Control'. They are equiped with everything that is required to fight a fire or to contain flooding. Each member of the crew has a damage control area asigned to them. The HQ would normally be the MCR (main engine control room), with a damage control area Fwd and Aft. Even the ships cook is required to train.

                  The Nautical College at Ringaskiddy, has a superb facility where all realistic aspects of fire fighting are thaught.

                  I recall a scene in training at Haulbowline, where one was required to enter a blazing helicopter where you had seconds to remove the pilot (a dummy) from the cockpit. A tool was carried to quickly cut the pilot out from his harness. And they were real live flames! Your protection was a BA set, wool fire suit and full face helmet.

                  In addition, regular training take place, not just in fire fighting, but also in evecuation and survival. An example would be 'abandon ship'


                  A highly trained organisation the Irish Navy are!
                  Last edited by Test Pilot; 17 January 2008, 20:31.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Test Pilot View Post
                    Yes they will, Rooster. The local fire brigade is already on board. All the crews are trained in fire fighting and in particular 'Hot Fire' training. This includes BA (breathing aperatus), the use of waterwall, boundry cooling, rescue, evacuation, containment, communications, shoreing and other practices.

                    Each ship has a number of areas called 'Damage Control'. They are equiped with everything that is required to fight a fire or to contain flooding. Each member of the crew has a damage control area asigned to them. The HQ would normally be the MCR (main engine control room), with a damage control area Fwd and Aft. Even the ships cook is required to train.
                    How would naval fire fighting training compare to landlubbers?.....ie could a NS bod work as a fire-fighter?
                    Everyone who's ever loved you was wrong.

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                    • #11
                      Nope....the local authorities recruit and train independently from the DF andAPFS are either trained by the Airport authourity ofr go to the IFTC in teeside..formerly the CAA Fire school.

                      Experience is an advantage but a lot of the techniques are different as local authouritys etc usually have a different time scale and agenda as opposed to ships fire fighters

                      Methods differ as Naval DC have to be aware of the amount of water they are taking on board as the amount can affest the stability of a ship.

                      Ship board fire fighting regards helos etc is focussed on a policy of 'snatch recue ' while APFS are totally opposed to this concept

                      Ships crews deal mainly with closed space envoirnmenst while local authourities etchave a greater range of options of fire after rescue. Ships crews have to deal with the water tight integrity of a ship while Local authourities primary concern is rescue and then preservation of property.

                      Look at any RTA to see the lenghts that Local Authorities go to preserve life...now that ships are compartmentalised to prevent fire spreading, flooding etc..hardly warrants tearing into a bulk head witha 'ripper gun' or con saw to get to a fire.

                      Ships fire fighting is more like industrial or APFS in that they are alwys compromised by media,shortage of man powerand the potentail for other events secondary to the fire becoming even more life threatning

                      Each is a different artform ..yeah the basics are the same but Incident control has different priorities.
                      Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by hptmurphy View Post
                        Methods differ as Naval DC have to be aware of the amount of water they are taking on board as the amount can affest the stability of a ship.
                        Are all the anti fire fighting techniques sea water based? Or is there CO2 or anything of the like?
                        Meh.

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                        • #13
                          Engine rooms usually have a CO2 system to smother the fire in engineering spaces. In the past Halon was used instead. However the water you'll use is seawater. Foam can be added, depending on where your fire is. Hoses and water hydrant points are located throughout the ship, as are the normal fire extinguishers you'd find in any home or factory.


                          Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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                          • #14
                            has there ever been a time in Irish Naval history that they crew had to abandon ship

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                            • #15
                              Oh dear.
                              Do you think if there had been you wouldnt have heard about it by now?


                              Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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