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Air Sea Rescue, Irish Sea

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  • #16
    Another one, this time a Container ship,Horn Cliff, in trouble 200 miles off the Scilly Isles. Heading for Cork. Has lost some containers, Captain believed to have spinal injuries.


    Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

    Comment


    • #17
      Its been a costly week.

      From the MCA website -

      http://www.mcga.gov.uk/c4mca/mcga-ne...8A2&m=2&y=2008

      Portrush lifeboats still aground on Rathlin Island -

      http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/northern_ireland/7222289.stm

      And a trawler wrecked off Northern Scotland last night -

      http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/...ds/7221597.stm


      Tried to locate the latest one on AIS, but can't find it. Thats a big ship,12887 tons, shows the power of the sea.
      'History is a vast early warning system'. Norman Cousins

      Comment


      • #18
        It seems the Portrush Lifeboat is now severely damaged. I think they are either GRP or Aluminium hulled. They will only take so much punishment.


        Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

        Comment


        • #19
          Talk is shes a write off. Theres a load of barrels at Ballycastle harbour for pumping the fuel into tomorrow.

          Sligo helicopter had to winch the crew off yesterday when they re-boarded and tried to tow her off.

          Feel sorry for them. Definitely not their fault.

          http://banana-boat-voyage.mysite.wan....uk/page1.html

          This looks like the Horn Cliff concerned ?
          'History is a vast early warning system'. Norman Cousins

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
            It seems the Portrush Lifeboat is now severely damaged. I think they are either GRP or Aluminium hulled. They will only take so much punishment.
            Looked like GRP on the BBC News.... Steel is what you want in a situation like that..

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by spider View Post
              Talk is shes a write off. Theres a load of barrels at Ballycastle harbour for pumping the fuel into tomorrow.

              Sligo helicopter had to winch the crew off yesterday when they re-boarded and tried to tow her off.

              Feel sorry for them. Definitely not their fault.
              Myself being an RNLI Govenor member, its sad to think that extra funds from the RNLI purse will have to be met to eventually cover repairs and see a lifeboat out of action for a considerable period.

              Comment


              • #22
                Freighter in trouble 180miles off Cork

                Heard on the news tonight an RAF heli has picked up crew (possibly 31 bodies onboard) off a freighter 180miles south of Cork Harbour. The Captain suffered spinal injuries and internal bleeding. THe ship is currently battling against Force 9 gales, moving slowly towards Cork

                Anyone anymore specifics?
                "The Question is not: how far you will take this? The Question is do you possess the constitution to go as far as is needed?"

                Comment


                • #23
                  Shoody journalism yet again!

                  " An RAF rescue helicopter from RNAS Culdrose "

                  How about An RAF rescue helicopter from RMB Chivenor!

                  Latest update is the Sea King arrived on scene at 0800 and a paramedic had been winched onto the vessel. The Captain is due to be taken to hospital in Cornwall.
                  Last edited by pmtts; 2 February 2008, 09:41.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by easyrider View Post
                    Looked like GRP on the BBC News.... Steel is what you want in a situation like that..
                    Steel would suffer the same fate as GRP. Having been up the north west coast last week and in discussion with a marine salvor, it was mentioned that it was strange that the tow line from the tug on site, (Belfast Harbour?) had parted under the current conditions. In short, the line should not part if the tow was long enough. From the news footage it was clear that the life boat was 'bouncing' on the rocks with each swell. If the tug had allowed a line to drift in to shore and be recovered, there would have been the possibility of hauling a more robust tow line ashore by shore parties. The lifeboat itself should have had 220 mtrs of nylon tow line on board, which if bent to the tugs line would have made a really long tow. A weight would normally be hung in the middle of this line and with the tug taking up the slack, the line would streatch up to a third to act as an elastic band. With this tension in place the lifeboat could be coaxed off the rocks with each incoming swell. The trick is to have a really long line and to let the 'stretch' absorb the sudden jerks, while the tug would simply maintain the tension, but never to attempt to drag.
                    But as I have not seen any reports regarding the salvage attempts, I'm not sure exactly what happened here. Has anyone else got more information?
                    Last edited by Test Pilot; 2 February 2008, 15:08.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Latest from BBC - http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/cornwall/7223565.stm

                      They lost an anchor and 60 containers, whatever happened.



                      The tug used in the lifeboat operation was from the Port of Londonderry. Larne lifeboat and one of Morton's trawlers already tried to pull them off the rocks the night before. The tug managed to move the lifeboat a few feet before the line parted. It seems that the lifeboat was getting battered by waves and a decision was made to airlift the crew off before the line could be reconnected. Thats a very tricky place in there, the tides around Rathlin Island are horrendous. The coast of the Island is littered with wrecks.

                      There are RNLI experts on-scene to oversee the recovery operation.

                      This was NOT the lifeboat coxswains fault. They were put in an impossible situation, and one which has led to this unfortunate outcome.

                      Due to the media coverage which I saw, in which a BBC reporter seemed to take delight in the fact that the rescuers were having to be rescued, the true story is not being told.
                      'History is a vast early warning system'. Norman Cousins

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Test Pilot View Post
                        Steel would suffer the same fate as GRP. ......
                        Wouldn't steel stand up much better to being battered on the rocks than GRP?

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          RAF helicopter is probably from RAF St.Mawgan (in Cornwall), RN helicopter would be from RNAS Culdrose. Why was RN Sea King sent out when there was already a RAF Sea King in Cork?

                          RNLI Severn class (as based in Portrush) is Fibre Reinforced Composite (is that the same as GRP?) as all RNLI lifeboats (apart from RIBs) are.

                          Would appear from interviews with survivors on Sky that the vessel lost all its containers.
                          Last edited by DeV; 2 February 2008, 11:57.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by DeV View Post
                            Would appear from interviews with survivors on Sky that the vessel lost all its containers.
                            Good grief

                            Did they say what happened ?

                            Another big wave ? They were reporting seas between 7 and 10 metres on scene last night.
                            'History is a vast early warning system'. Norman Cousins

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              what size of a wave would do that to a vessel that big

                              and if a ferry that big can get damaged like that

                              It kind of gives me a new respect for our Navy who are out in

                              all weathers and on worse seas than the Irish Sea

                              (even if some of them never ever wash)
                              Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
                              Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
                              The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere***
                              The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
                              The best lack all conviction, while the worst
                              Are full of passionate intensity.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Of course they wash.. Thats what the big waves are for.

                                So who still thinks the Naval Service don't need much larger ships?

                                I assume the Heli went from St Mawgan, or Culdrose because the Ship was closer to Cornwall than Cork. Prevailing wind may have been working against them. The ship was closer to the french coast than the Irish Coast.

                                From Spiders Link...
                                Injured captain winched off ship

                                The vessel is heading to Falmouth


                                Dramatic sea rescue
                                A cargo ship captain who was seriously injured in a force 10 gale off the Isles of Scilly has been winched on to a helicopter and taken to hospital.
                                The rescue helicopter arrived at the Horncliff, 70 miles south west of Land's End, just before 0800 GMT.

                                Six other people were also rescued. The captain and two people with less serious injuries have been taken to hospital in Truro, Cornwall.

                                Rescue attempts were abandoned overnight because of the danger.

                                The helicopter spent an hour hovering over the ship on Friday night in a failed attempt to winch up the captain, who is suffering from serious spinal injuries.

                                The exact circumstances of how he suffered his injuries are unknown.

                                The coastguard tug has been tasked to go and stand by

                                Henry Purbrick, Falmouth Coastguard

                                Two other people were injured - one has a broken hand and another has head injuries. They are not thought to be seriously hurt.

                                The ship is now sailing towards Falmouth and is expected to arrive later on Saturday.

                                Henry Purbrick from Falmouth Coastguard said: "The coastguard tug has been tasked to go and stand by and escort them in.

                                "They will be anchored out side Falmouth because they've only got one anchor - they've lost an anchor at some stage.


                                "Then surveyors from Falmouth will go and survey the vessel and decide where they go from there."



                                'Pitch black'

                                During the first rescue attempt, a helicopter from RMB Chivenor in Devon reached the vessel just before 2100 GMT having refuelled in Cork in the Irish Republic.


                                But after nearly an hour hovering over the ship trying to get the injured man off, assisted by a Nimrod maritime patrol aircraft from Scotland, the attempt had to be abandoned.


                                A helicopter from RNAS Culdrose rescued the seven people

                                Flt Lt Jonathan Singh, the captain of the helicopter, said the conditions were "horrendous".

                                "It's obviously pitch black out there, it's extremely dark with no sort of cultural lighting at all at that distance from land," he said.


                                There were 31 passengers and crew on board the Horncliff, which had been travelling to Dover carrying a cargo of fruit from Costa Rica.


                                Falmouth Coastguard said the vessel, which lost about 90 containers of fruit in the storm, had suffered some damage and was listing slightly, but there was no danger of it sinking.

                                The Horncliff, a 12,887-tonne cargo ship which is flying the Liberian flag, was built in 1992.

                                Power cuts

                                Elsewhere in the UK the extreme weather conditions have left thousands of homes without power and caused chaos on the roads.

                                Blizzards swept across Scotland and northern England on Friday and winds reached 80 mph bringing down many trees.


                                One carriageway of the A66 in County Durham has now reopened after heavy snow trapped 200 drivers and passengers who had to be rescued.


                                About 1,600 homes are still without power in Yorkshire and Lincolnshire.

                                Icy roads

                                Attempts to refloat the grounded Irish Sea ferry Riverdance were abandoned on Friday evening and are unlikely to resume on Saturday.

                                The vessel beached off Blackpool after helicopters and lifeboats rescued the crew and passengers.

                                Fourteen crewmen were also flown to safety after their trawler, The Spinning Dale, was pushed into rocks off St Kilda in the Western Isles on Friday.

                                Less biting weather is expected on Saturday although warnings of icy roads have been issued for many parts of the UK.
                                Last edited by Goldie fish; 2 February 2008, 12:39.


                                Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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