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  • #61
    Is it true that the physical location of radio operators is no longer a constraint, as there are slave radio transmitter/receivers that are remotely-operated?

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    • #62
      Originally posted by easyrider View Post
      Is it true that the physical location of radio operators is no longer a constraint, as there are slave radio transmitter/receivers that are remotely-operated?
      It is true yes, there are rebro's in place around the coast.

      So for example, Cork Coastguard radio, Bantry Coastguard radio, Mizen head coastguard radio are all controlled from Valentia.

      Valentia control from Cork To Galway,
      Malin control the north/northwest coasts
      Dublin control from Carlingford lough to Dungarvan.

      So we have 3 manned stations in total.

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      • #63
        If you make the Malin and Valentia stations unmanned, its only a short step from having Marine Rescue coordinated from the UK, or even Brussels. If Mizen radio goes u/s for any reason, while there are staff on site, it won't take long for staff to get the transmitters back up and running. But given the remoteness of both stations, if they were unmanned, how long would that take? How many lives would be lost in the interim?

        There was a time when every lighthouse was manned, and some even were equipped with radar to keep an eye on movements of small craft in poor visibility, but these were withdrawn.

        On a related note, Trinity House wants to stop paying CIL every year...


        Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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        • #64
          Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
          If you make the Malin and Valentia stations unmanned, its only a short step from having Marine Rescue coordinated from the UK, or even Brussels.
          Good point Goldie, Swansea or Falmouth MRCC could deal with the Valentia, and Clyde or Aberdeen MRCC could deal with Malin.

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          • #65
            Because of Course, Falmouth, Swansea, Clyde or Aberdeen don't already have enough to do. Apart from the Channel, The north Sea Oil fields, Pentland Firth..etc


            Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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            • #66
              Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
              Because of Course, Falmouth, Swansea, Clyde or Aberdeen don't already have enough to do. Apart from the Channel, The north Sea Oil fields, Pentland Firth..etc
              Not Forgetting Yarmouth & Dover MRCC! :wink:

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              • #67
                Sure they are almost idle...


                Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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                • #68
                  It does'nt seem to make sense to oversea the Western part of the Irish AOR from a centre on the East Coast. Theres also got to be years of local knowledge etc invested in Malin. And a relationship between the RO's and the vessels they're dealing with on a daily basis.

                  In 2000, duty rumour in Belfast MRC was that they were going to be closed, and Clyde would cover. The strongest argument they could put forward for retaining Belfast at that time was that they also covered Lough Neagh, Lough Erne etc, busy inland waterways in their own right.

                  Belfast has'nt closed.... yet.

                  And they were on strike today.
                  'History is a vast early warning system'. Norman Cousins

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                  • #69
                    Originally posted by spider View Post
                    And they were on strike today.
                    I saw the picketing outside the HQ in Southampton this morning!.

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                    • #70
                      Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
                      On a related note, Trinity House wants to stop paying CIL every year...
                      The Naval Service has been known to colaborate with other agencies such as CIL.

                      Attached pics are from on board the CIL vessel Granuaile, where the combined crews operated the Naval ROV. The control room is a dedicated and portable structure which can be moved to any location by road or ship, if needed in a search operation.
                      Attached Files
                      Last edited by Test Pilot; 6 March 2008, 21:26.

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                      • #71
                        Originally posted by spider View Post
                        It does'nt seem to make sense to oversea the Western part of the Irish AOR from a centre on the East Coast. Theres also got to be years of local knowledge etc invested in Malin. And a relationship between the RO's and the vessels they're dealing with on a daily basis.
                        It won't. The plan is to have TWO centres one in the east with coastguard HQ (Drogheda or Dublin) and the other in a location in the west (possibly Malin, Valentia or some other location on the West coast) with the option that one could be used for the whole country in an emergency, e.g. one of the centres was to go down.

                        http://www.transport.ie/viewitem.asp...g=ENG&loc=2077
                        Last edited by CTU; 6 March 2008, 21:50.
                        It was the year of fire...the year of destruction...the year we took back what was ours.
                        It was the year of rebirth...the year of great sadness...the year of pain...and the year of joy.
                        It was a new age...It was the end of history.
                        It was the year everything changed.

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                        • #72
                          Three men in a boat!

                          It's makes you think the mentality people have. The cost of this call-out must have been huge. They should be made to pay.

                          Three men set off in a small boat across the channel to France this morning sparking a search after concerns were raised for their safety. Their 12 foot boat has been found ashore in France and the men have been detained by French Police this evening.

                          Dover Coastguard was alerted at just after 10.20 this morning (Thursday) after a 999 call from a mother reporting that her son and others had taken a boat to sea and were heading for France.

                          A Rescue Helicopter from RAF Wattisham, the Maritime and Coastguard Agency Surveillance aircraft, lifeboats from Ramsgate and Walmer and Coastguard Rescue Teams were involved in the search, which was stood down at 6pm after the men were located in France, between Calais and Gris Nez.

                          Murray Milligan, of Dover Coastguard said: This is an extremely busy shipping lane to navigate in such a small craft, and we understand that none of the three had any experience in sailing or navigation, which made this a particularly dangerous undertaking.

                          The Coastguard search was stood down shortly after 6pm, and this is now a matter for the French authorities.
                          Last edited by pmtts; 9 March 2008, 14:30.

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                          • #73
                            Yes it was crazy, but it would appear that it was a group of clueless young lads that went on an adventure. However, I blame Jeremy Clarkson for sowing the seeds for this daft sea trip!

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                            • #74
                              P&O's Artemis has fallen victim to the current storms.

                              A rouge wave has damaged the Southampton-based cruise ship as she battled against gale force winds in the English Channel.

                              The towering wave crashed over the ship's bow in the early hours of this morning hitting the anchor storage area and forcing the ship to change course and head for the shelter in Falmouth.

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                              • #75
                                Another victim of th eRecent weather was the Germas Sail Training vessel, Roald Amundsen, which arrived in Cobh yesterday morning from Lisbon.


                                The crew of trainees(one Irish) seemed relieved to be back on dry land again after encountering three storms since they begun their journey on monday 3rd March. The sails for the most part are shredded to bits.



                                The crew members I spoke to had anticipated the worst of their voyage to be in the Bay of Biscay, but the real problems begun off the south coast of ireland, where they faced 120kt westerly winds. Amundsen was originally built as a tanker barge in the 1950s, but was converted to a sail training vessel on the reunification of germany in 1989.

                                As an aside, the crew member I spoke with was a Policeman in normal life with what was formerly known as the Bundesgrenshutz, and was one of those involved in the visit of Pope John Paul 2 to ireland in 1979. He was surprised that I had heard of their Puma being the first aircraft used by an Garda Siochana. They now fly the Super Puma, Eurocopter EC135 and 155, and had similar complaints about the Dauphin as we had. i.e, the more you put into it, the less useful range you have.


                                Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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