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Asgard 2 Sinking in Bay of Biscay

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  • Goldie fish
    replied
    Big fanfare, she was built by Tyrrels in Arkla, and charlie failed to break the champagne on her, which was considered a bad omen.

    Big fanfare when she went to the USA the first time, Huge fanfare when she went to Oz for the Bicentennial.
    Big fanfare during the Various Tall Ships races that visited Ireland.

    Leave a comment:


  • turbocalves
    replied
    Originally posted by GoneToTheCanner View Post
    Turbo, I thought, for years, that the Asgard was only for those with sailing experience or connections to the sea and that it'd be full of yachty types.I went on it last year at age 42 and had a great time.You could actually see the changes happening in young people in front of your face, which was amazing.If you'd had a go on it, you'd be here,begging to see it raised or replaced.
    regards
    GttC
    i'm not sayin dont raise her, i was curious as i knew little or nthin about her pre to my joining of imo, and as you said you thought iwas full of yachty type, so the info is obviously lackin,

    your right if i did go on her i probably would be shouting in her defence, but alas i didnt through no fault of my own, and i have no problem with them replacing it, i just dont think that JNS comment sayin scrap the reserve in favour of the the ship is something i would agree with ....


    as for goldie outta curiosity was there much fanfare when she was launched, because there was never any mention of her where i grew up, consideringi lived 25 min from kilmainham where her predecessor livesmight strike ya as a bit odd....

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  • Goldie fish
    replied
    I'd say you can thank Charlie Haughey for that.
    He knew that none of the other Government departments were competent enough to keep a ship above water.

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  • johnny no stars
    replied
    if the order of the posts is a little confused, it's because some have been moved from the thread about the future of the reserve.

    As for why it's int he DoD, god knows, this is the government we're talking about here.

    Leave a comment:


  • hedgehog
    replied
    Originally posted by johnny no stars View Post


    THanks for that.

    Nah, you were actually paying for my brother. But then again... so were my parents. Go figure

    I've always scrounged directly from people when I want to go sailing.... My morals are too high to allow me to indirectly scrounge for leisure :wink:
    Your brother never once thanked me

    and Goldie has the neck to slag me off every single day

    and theres me

    who contributed to his sail to damascuc type transformation into a decent person

    On a relative point

    why is it under the auspices of DOD- why not D Education- sports tourism- tpt- Marine etc

    Leave a comment:


  • johnny no stars
    replied
    Originally posted by hedgehog View Post
    = the tax payer actually subsidsidised JNS and all her mates in Milano Bianko wellies:wink:


    THanks for that.

    Nah, you were actually paying for my brother. But then again... so were my parents. Go figure

    I've always scrounged directly from people when I want to go sailing.... My morals are too high to allow me to indirectly scrounge for leisure :wink:

    Leave a comment:


  • Goldie fish
    replied
    Originally posted by johnny no stars View Post

    Sailing doesn't need much by way of medical requirements. I personally have seen kids with serious breathing difficulty, various degrees of blindness, scoliosis, deafness, circulatory issues so on and so on sailing perfectly ok. All these things rule people out of the reserve. The asgard made this even more possible as it's less "active" than dinghy sailing (where most kids start out).



    The Jubilee Trusts Lord Nelson, which is wheelchair accessable, and gives the opportunity for people with mobility disabilities the opportunity to take a full part in handling a square rigged sailing vessel.

    http://www.jst.org.uk/

    Leave a comment:


  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    Turbo, I thought, for years, that the Asgard was only for those with sailing experience or connections to the sea and that it'd be full of yachty types.I went on it last year at age 42 and had a great time.You could actually see the changes happening in young people in front of your face, which was amazing.If you'd had a go on it, you'd be here,begging to see it raised or replaced.
    regards
    GttC

    Leave a comment:


  • Goldie fish
    replied
    There is a link to the Asgard II on the DoD website. Asgard has always been the property of the Minister for Defence.

    Its only been about since 1981.

    If you were interested, you would have found out about it. I don't live near the sea, I am not surrounded by a sailing community,my family never sailed(mother would barely get on the cross river ferry) but I was aware of her from her launch.

    What did they have to do to make you aware of her? I don't know where you live, but she's only a small ship, and she doesnt get inland much.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnny no stars
    replied
    Originally posted by turbocalves View Post
    i would have thought the medical requirements for sailin woulda been a little tighter than those for the reserve....

    but as i said i dont realy knowmuch about it,

    if it could be expanded to make it more accessable would be good but with only one vessel (i feel like a knob when i say vessel) its goin to be extremely limited to even try out,

    unlike the reserve which nationally could take a lot more people in and also is less expensive "theoretically" its free but we know thats not true....

    The club where I learned to sail had an access programme. It ran a course at bare minimum cost that provided temporary club membership, all the gear, the boats and the tuition. At the end of it, provided kids made the grade, they got the same ISA certificate that their regular club member counterparts got. They got ZERO funding for the incentive. The Asgard is only one way of opening it up - there's plenty of local stuff like that that can be done. However, the Asgard provided a different alternative to those that for whatever reason didn't want to/couldn't undergo dinghy sailing.

    Sailing doesn't need much by way of medical requirements. I personally have seen kids with serious breathing difficulty, various degrees of blindness, scoliosis, deafness, circulatory issues so on and so on sailing perfectly ok. All these things rule people out of the reserve. The asgard made this even more possible as it's less "active" than dinghy sailing (where most kids start out).

    Leave a comment:


  • hedgehog
    replied
    Okey dokey

    in response to I dont want to pay for other peoples kids to go sailing


    Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
    You never did. They paid their own way. The taxpayer only paid for the ships running cost, and the Permanent crews wages.

    Ships powered by sail don't burn much fuel...
    if the tax payer (Moi and tusa) paid a bit for the running costs

    +
    The crews wages

    = the tax payer actually subsidsidised JNS and all her mates in Milano Bianko wellies:wink:

    is that how you spell it

    Leave a comment:


  • Goldie fish
    replied
    I didnt start it.

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  • turbocalves
    replied
    Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
    It was always available to you, if you looked.

    I would prefer if there was an STV for every small town in Ireland, as the Army reserve was available in such frequency. However, the State could only manage one STV, with room for 20 trainees at a time(20 per week, from March to November usually), and there was a long waiting list.

    These days, almost every brat in ireland heads to the sun with their classmates after the leaving cert. A week on Asgard would have cost you less.

    Now there is none.
    thats not the point,

    i never knew of the asgard til i was on IMO,

    unlike the reserve which i knew of since i was 12/13 because it was alot more available to people where i grew up and i had friends school mate and so forth who were in it,....

    Leave a comment:


  • turbocalves
    replied
    Originally posted by johnny no stars View Post
    Don't get me wrong, I'd love to see it made available to all kids to try. The same way as other sports are. Which is one of the reasons I think the Asgard was so great. Not everyone can join the RDF, anyone that doesn't meet medical standards can't, but a hugely wider range of people could go on the asgard. It may not have been a perfect system, but it was a start in opening it up to more young people. I'd love to see it be hugely funded so that all kids could fork out say, 50 to 100 euro and go away for a few days on the asgard.
    i would have thought the medical requirements for sailin woulda been a little tighter than those for the reserve....

    but as i said i dont realy knowmuch about it,

    if it could be expanded to make it more accessable would be good but with only one vessel (i feel like a knob when i say vessel) its goin to be extremely limited to even try out,

    unlike the reserve which nationally could take a lot more people in and also is less expensive "theoretically" its free but we know thats not true....

    Leave a comment:


  • Goldie fish
    replied
    Originally posted by turbocalves View Post
    without goin into persoanl detail which arent for discussion here....


    now i dont have anything against sail trainin but in terms of availability to people its is very very limited, unlike the reserve who will take anyone, and as long as you put in effort you'll get something out of it.....


    if sail trainin was available to me as a wee lad then maybe i'd agree with ya,
    but it wasnt....
    It was always available to you, if you looked.

    I would prefer if there was an STV for every small town in Ireland, as the Army reserve was available in such frequency. However, the State could only manage one STV, with room for 20 trainees at a time(20 per week, from March to November usually), and there was a long waiting list.

    These days, almost every brat in ireland heads to the sun with their classmates after the leaving cert. A week on Asgard would have cost you less.

    Now there is none.

    Leave a comment:

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