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  • DeV
    replied
    Ireland's new national training ship sails into Dublin

    https://www.rte.ie/news/ireland/2022...training-ship/

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    Nice tour of the vessel.

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    Ireland’s Hopes for a Tall Ship Are Running High

    8th January 2022

    WM Nixon


    Ship of Hope: if all goes according to plan for the Atlantic Youth Trust, by the summer the Lady Ellen will be the Grace O’Malley, Ireland’s multi-purpose training ship
    4
    SHARES
    What goes around comes around. When Enda O’Coineen’s Atlantic Youth Trust revealed their interest in acquiring a classic three-masted topsail schooner from Sweden last Autumn for multiple maritime functions, of which sailing training would only be one, it set bells ringing in many ways — most of them positive.

    The warmest feelings were aroused by the classic appearance of the 164ft Lady Ellen. For the reality is that these days, the professional seafarers who undertake the demanding task of being responsible for the safety, well-being and instruction of dozens of other people’s children in sail training programmes are themselves expecting certain standards of onboard comfort.

    In fact, the more fastidious expect accommodation which equals that provided for their colleagues serving in the best ships of the international merchant marine and the leading navies.

    As a consequence, many modern tall ships are a very odd combination of classic clipper ship forward, and a sort of mini cruise liner aft. In some of them, this effect is achieved to such gross effect that it reminds you of the old saying that a camel is a horse designed by committee.


    She looks like a proper classic sailing ship, and sails like one too

    But when the first photos were released in Ireland of the Lady Ellen, everyone just gave a happy sigh. Her sweet appearance may be slightly marred by a sort of wheelhouse shelter right on the aftermost pin of the quarterdeck, but otherwise her deck cabins are of modest height, with the overall effect being one of harmony.

    And for those with memories stretching back over many years, the appearance of the Lady Ellen was like a friendly ghost brought to life, as she is a reminder of the hopes of two great sea-minded people who pioneered the idea of an Irish tall ship at a time when officialdom seemed determined to obliterate any consciousness of our maritime potential.


    The inspirational Arklow-based Lady of Avenel

    One was Jack Tyrrell of Arklow, whose schoolboy summers as ship’s boy aboard his uncle’s trading brigantine Lady of Avenel were so central to the beneficial shaping of his character that his lifelong dream was to provide subsequent generations with the chance to share a similar experience.

    The other was an inspirational teacher, Captain Tom Walsh, who ran the little Nautical College in Dun Laoghaire, and kept the flame of Irish maritime hopes alive in what was a very thin time for Ireland and the sea. One result of this was that in 1954, Jack Tyrrell designed for Tom Walsh some proposal drawings for a 110ft three-masted barquentine to serve as an Irish sail training ship.


    We’ve been here before: the 1954-proposed 110ft barquentine, designed by Jack Tyrrell for Captain Tom Walsh, is remarkably similar to the Lady Ellen


    By the summer, this could be the Grace O’Malley


    Captain Tom Walsh of the Nautical College in Dun Laoghaire – seen here in 1957 – was ahead of his time in sail-training ship proposals

    In the slow-moving 1950s, it was an idea before its time. And when Ireland did finally get a national sail-trailing ship in 1969, it was through a completely different route, with the repurposed Asgard, Erskine and Molly Childers’ 1905-built Colin Archer 51ft ketch used in the 1914 Irish Volunteers gun-running to Howth.

    She was and is a fine little ship, now conserved by the National Museum and on display in Collins Barracks. But she was too small for the job, and very soon a movement was under way to have her replaced with a larger “mini tall ship”. In the February 1973 issue of Afloat Magazine, proposal drawings by Jack Tyrrell appeared of a ship inspired again by the Lady of Avenel, but of a more modest size at 83ft hull length.

    By this time the sail training programme was in the remit of the Department of Defence, as it tended to be shunted around whichever government minister was interested in the sea — the choice was never extensive. But the newly-appointed Minister for Defence, Patrick Sarsfield Donegan TD of Co Louth, was keen on boats and sailing. He willingly undertook the Asgard programme. And he happened to see those plans one morning as he was starting to make a very thorough job of celebrating his saint’s day in his own pub, the Monasterboice Inn.


    Jack Tyrrell of Arklow with Clayton Love Jr, Admiral of the Royal Cork YC and one of the founders — and the longest-serving member — of Coiste an Asgard

    Thus there is absolutely no doubt that the decision to build the 84ft Tyrrell-designed and Arklow-built Asgard II was taken by Paddy Donegan on 17 March 1973, but it was March 1981 by the time she was in commission.

    She gave excellent service, punching way above her weight on the national and international scene for 29 seasons, until in September 2008 she struck a semi-submerged object in the Bay of Biscay, and gradually but inexorably sank, with all the crew being safely taken off.

    With Ireland going into economic freefall in the total crash of the Celtic Tiger, the then Government — to outside observers, at least — appeared to take advantage of the situation to divest themselves of the entire notion of a national sail-training ship and a government-administered programme to support it. This was so abundantly evident that dedicated maritime enthusiasts came to the conclusion that the only way forward was through a non-governmental trust functioning on an all-Ireland basis, and thus the Atlantic Youth Trust came into being under the inspiration of oceanic adventurer and international entrepreneur Enda O’Coineen.

    There are hundreds of subtly different meanings to the word “no”, but Enda doesn’t understand any of them. He is totally resilient in face of setbacks, be they in business or when he’s alone out on the Great Southern Ocean. And he is of the opinion that general derision or a flat refusal is actually — if the other party only knew it — a cheery greeting and a positive reception of whatever way-out idea he is proposing.


    Galway rules the waves: Enda O’Coineen with President Michael D Higgins

    Nevertheless, the Atlantic Youth Trust’s concept — developed by its director Neil O’Hagan to provide a ship partially based on the Sprit of New Zealand’s realised vision of a floating classroom and expedition centre as much as a sail training ship — was well received but difficult to grow in a time of national austerity, with political turmoil in the all-Ireland context.

    But the idea had certainly never gone away, and while there are many reasons as to why it is now tops of the agenda once more. The fact that the Lady Ellen was for sale last September in western Sweden played a key role, with the excitement of the chase being heightened by the fact that it had been thought she’d been sold elsewhere.


    Stripped down for winter, the Lady Ellen in Sweden awaits her new future in Ireland

    However, that seemingly fell through, she came back on the market, and now the deposit has been paid by Atlantic Youth Trust supporters subject to all the usual legalities and technicalities, such that if everything proves acceptable survey-wise and under other headings, the deal has to be closed by the end of February.

    While she was built as long ago as 1980 for a Swedish industrialist with personal attachments to the prototype, the 1911-built wooden trading schooner Lady Ellen, the current ship’s hull is in top-grade steel as used for submarine construction, so not surprisingly she came through a 2015 survey and major refit with flying colours.


    This is one serious ship, built in submarine-quality steel to last for a very long time

    Yet to the casual observer she seems to be all wood in her finish, and therein lies an extraordinary problem that will have to be faced by the AYT when, if all goes according to plan, the ship undergoes significant work with the Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast in the spring.

    For her present accommodation is positively luxurious by sail training standards, though her seagoing credentials are impeccable with 17 transatlantic passages logged. Yet below decks, we’re talking of en suite cabins for around 35 in all, whereas the trust will be seeking to up the accommodation to at least 40 and probably 45 in all, with 30-35 trainees plus five experienced youth leaders and five professional crew.


    The existing accommodation details may need significant amounts of unravelling in order to accommodate a total ship’s company of 45-plus


    The saloon — taking up the full width of the vessel — makes such extensive use of wood and varnish finish that you forget you’re on a steel ship


    Even the “basic” crew cabin reflects the “problematically high” quality of the interior finish

    When Jack Tyrrell was sketching out the accommodation for the Tom Walsh ship of 1954, he simply indicated space where the crew’s sleeping accommodation would be found. He may well have expected that the young people would be happily slinging a hammock from the deck beams.

    But as the photos of the current ship indicate, while not totally luxurious, her accommodation is stylish, very well finished, glowing with the best of varnish-work, and generous with space. So some of it will have to come out, and we can only hope that it’s treated a little more kindly than the bits and pieces of the original Colin Archer interior for Asgard which, in 1968 when she was being converted for sail training by Malahide Shipyard, were brutally consigned to a bonfire.


    The separate cabins emphasise the high quality of the finish

    With repurposing all the rage these days, some of the ship’s current accommodation could certainly find some interesting and useful functions ashore, or in other boats. But the fact is while the vessel is being bought reportedly for the attractive price of €1.78 million, unbuilding and rebuilding can be an expensive process, as can the necessary replacing of standing and running rigging, and perhaps some spars.

    Thus, if all goes according to plan with the deal closed at the end of February, the current project of getting the ship in commission in her new form, with the necessary shoreside support systems up and running, will be very rapidly making significant dents in the overall budget of €3 million.

    And we have to remember that while the gallant Asgard II succeeded in punching above her weight among much larger tall ships, this new vessel is twice as long overall, making her in volumetric terms very much more than simply twice as large. So it’s going to take a considerable and constant effort to keep her in optimal trim and at full functional level. For apart from anything else, a busy ship is a happy ship, but a 164ft three-masted topsail schooner is a lot of ship to keep busy.

    Yet the very fact that the Grace O’Malley, as she’ll be popularly renamed, has now come centre stage is just the tonic that we all need at this time of tiny slivers of hope, when it’s just possible the light at the end of the tunnel is not entirely a total pandemic express train coming the other way. We wish her well.


    She’ll be even more welcome than the flowers in spring – the Grace O’Malley may be coming to a port near you
    Ireland’s Hopes for a Tall Ship Are Running High (afloat.ie)

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    Replacement for sunken Asgard II training vessel secured


    The three-mast vessel is a replica of a famous 19th-century wooden ship, the Lady Ellen.


    WED, 05 JAN, 2022 - 17:00
    ELLEN O'REGAN

    The Atlantic Youth Trust Charity (AYT) has secured a new 164ft tall ship to replace the Asgard II, which was the Irish national sail training vessel, until it sank in 2008.

    The charity has negotiated a contract and placed a deposit to secure a 164ft Tradewind schooner, currently located in Sweden, which will serve as the new flagship for introducing young people across the island of Ireland to maritime careers through youth development programmes.

    The three-mast vessel is a replica of a famous 19th-century wooden ship, the Lady Ellen, built with submarine standard steel, a 99ft main mast, and 13 sails. Owned and used over recent years by Tarbet Shipping, based in Skarhamn, she has crossed the Atlantic 17 times.

    Annual funding of €950,000 for the Asgard II came from the National Lottery. The Department of Defence is now completing due diligence on the reinstatement of this annual funding for the new ship.

    If funding is confirmed, the AYT will move ahead with raising €2.5m of private sponsorship to complete the purchase of the vessel before the end of February 2022.



    The ship will be renamed the Grace O’Malley, after the Mayo pirate queen.
    The vessel will need to be certified for sailing training use, as well as refitted to remove more luxurious features such as a hospitality bar and en-suites, to make room for a training area and up to 45 berths, which will accommodate almost double the number of trainees as the Asgard II.

    AYT is hopeful Government funding will be designated, and the vessel will be sailed to Ireland later this year for its refit in Belfast, and a ceremony where it will be renamed the Grace O’Malley, after the Mayo pirate queen.

    As an “Asgard baby” himself, Cormac Gebruers, head of the National Maritime College of Ireland, highlighted the particular importance of the ship for youth development and engagement with maritime careers.

    “We are seeing a drop in young people who are getting involved in maritime careers. In the past, it was possible to get out on ships and tugs and pilot boats to experience what it’s like, but the way the world has changed with insurance and health and safety, these opportunities aren't there anymore. So a structured, safe opportunity in the form of a sail training vessel is hugely important to attract young people into maritime professions,” he said.

    “It’s a door-opener, but also a lifesaver for some young kids."
    Replacement for sunken Asgard II training vessel secured (irishexaminer.com)

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    Originally posted by DeV View Post

    How does 30 trainees compare to Asgard 2?
    10 more. But also 5 more experienced watch leaders, Asgard II just had a Skipper, Mate, Eng, bosun & Cook, and The Watch leaders were included in the 20 trainees.
    On Asgard II we were split into 4 watches, and one from each watch would be detailed to the galley every day. During a passage then, you had 3 lookouts, one on helm. During a passage, it was pretty full on, and there wasn't much spare time for training. If your watch leader happened to be in the Galley that day, you were relying on one of the permanent crew to lead the way for that watch.
    A larger group provides a better classroom size also.
    The ship that has been secured currently operates as a pleasure vessel, and its cabins are designed for holidaying guests, and there are large communal dining/drinking/socialising spaces.
    Because it is registered to carry more than 12 passengers, it must comply with more strict design and safety regulations than a vessel that would carry less than 12 passengers, or as was the case with Asgard II, a cargo vessel.
    From a regulatory perspective operating a ship with 12 passengers or under is very different to 12 and over. In order to create a more transferable community environment on board with a more diverse group of young people we concluded over 12 was best, and based on further research and consultation we found 40 was optimal.
    * The New Zealand model has proved successful for 40+ years, the programme is academically proven, and independent research highlighted it as the most suitable model for our needs. Their ship has capacity for 40 trainees.
    * We are replacing two previous ships, Asgard II and The Lord Rank.

    * The population on the island of Ireland has risen by over 20% since the Asgard II was launched.
    * Decision – 40 trainees optimal.
    The Ship – Atlantic Youth Trust
    Topsail Schooner Sailing Yacht 'Lady Ellen' For Sale at Sea Independent

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  • Sparky42
    replied
    Originally posted by DeV View Post

    How does 30 trainees compare to Asgard 2?
    There was only 20 when she went down, was that the normal crew numbers or could she carry more?

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  • DeV
    replied
    Originally posted by na grohmiti View Post
    How does 30 trainees compare to Asgard 2?

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    Originally posted by GoneToTheCanner View Post
    Change the name of the ship to STV "John De Courcy Ireland", an outstanding educator, activist and friend of seafarers and mariners everywhere. I had the pleasure of meeting him just once but he left a lasting impression.
    Same here. Met him at Haigh Terrace in the museum, while visiting with a girlfriend as a teenager. He explained to us all about how Titanic had sunk long before there was documentaries about that sort of thing, and before the wreck had been discovered and explored .
    However he was also a man who would have appreciated the reason the ship is being named as it is, and would be fully supportive of the project.

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  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    Change the name of the ship to STV "John De Courcy Ireland", an outstanding educator, activist and friend of seafarers and mariners everywhere. I had the pleasure of meeting him just once but he left a lasting impression.

    Leave a comment:


  • na grohmiti
    replied
    New 164-ft Irish Tall Ship 'Grace O'Malley' is Secured By Atlantic Youth Trust in Sweden

    3rd January 2022

    Afloat.ie Team

    Meet Tall Ship Grace O’Malley: the 164-ft replacement for Asgard II that has been secured by the Atlantic Youth Trust
    17
    SHARES
    The Atlantic Youth Trust Charity chaired by Round the World sailor Enda O'Coineen, says a 164ft Tradewind schooner it proposes to call 'STV Grace O'Malley' will act as the new ‘flagship’ for introducing young people across the island of Ireland to maritime and careers.

    As Afloat reported in October 2021, O’Coineen, a former Director of Coiste an Asgard, says "we have long since championed the need to replace Ireland’s lost sail training vessel the Asgard II in a dynamic and creative new way".

    Atlantic Youth Trust supporters travelled to Sweden to try out the new vessel in November and reports on the visit are very favourable for the project that will rely on public and private funding.

    The Charity says the tall ship will have a key role to play in the areas of research, innovation, tourism promotion and providing a support outlet for vulnerable young people.

    It is hoped the ship can become a floating embassy for Ireland at events home and abroad, ranging from Tall Ships races to trade events while all the time fulfilling her core youth and reconciliation mission.

    It is understood that a " mini-refit" will be required to suit Irish purposes. According to O'Coineen, she will need some cosmetic work on deck and will need to be repainted. Much of the running rigging, now several years old, will need replacement.

    It is anticipated that the current 35 berths, many of them with specifications ensuite, will need to be increased to 40 or 45 to accommodate 30 trainees, five full professional crew and five experienced youth leaders.

    The new ship is a replica of a famous 19th-century wooden ship The Lady Ellen. A successful Swedish industrialist who had seen her as a boy, loved her lines and had a replica rebuilt to the highest specifications in Submarine Steel.

    Owned and used over recent years by Tarbet Shipping, based in Skarhamn, she has crossed the Atlantic 17 times and has been maintained, regulated and certified to the highest standard.
    Some good news to start the year with.
    New 164-ft Irish Tall Ship 'Grace O'Malley' is Secured By Atlantic Youth Trust in Sweden (afloat.ie)

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  • ancientmariner
    replied
    Originally posted by na grohmiti View Post

    National Lottery may not be the ones who decide who gets the allocation, and as such there is no organisation in place to replace Coiste an Asgard, to get such funding.
    Coiste an Asgard was managed by CS within the Department of Defence. This provided Budgets, administration, and recruitment of permanent crew. Although many are lobbying and offering tailor made solutions the critical matter is creating the Home port and staffing of the selected vessel to create some focus for offering planned voyages for those who can benefit from Tall Ship sailing. The State is in a weak position as it relinquished most rights on first call for Port Services. It will have to be the State, by some means, who will re-establish Sail Training and provide funding.

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    Originally posted by DeV View Post
    Shouldn’t the appeal be to National Lottery?
    National Lottery may not be the ones who decide who gets the allocation, and as such there is no organisation in place to replace Coiste an Asgard, to get such funding.

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  • DeV
    replied
    Shouldn’t the appeal be to National Lottery?

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    Chairman of the Atlantic youth Trust Enda O` Coineen Joins Joe Byrne to discuss why The Atlantic Trust has made a direct appeal to Taoiseach Micheal Martin and Minister Simon Harris to reinstate 950,000 which came from the national lottery to support the operational costs of a new tall ship for Ireland.


    Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 14:19 — 19.7MB)

    Tall Ship Youth Training Vessel Requires Urgent Reinstatement of State Funding – Near FM – Listen Again

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    Originally posted by Jaque'ammer View Post
    This year's budget will be pretty conservative. I'll be surprised if anyone gets anything nice
    Listen to the clip, they aren't looking for money, just a mechanism.

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