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  • Maritime legislation enforcement required!

    We need someone to enforce safety in small boats..

    Teenager dies, man hurt in jet ski crash with boat

    By Dan Collins and Sean O’Riordan
    A teenager died and a young man in his 20s was seriously injured in a high-speed collision between a jet ski and a power boat in the harbour at Youghal last evening.
    The accident happened shortly before 8.30pm in clear and calm conditions at the mouth of the harbour. The cause of the fatal accident was last night under investigation. According to some sources both craft collided at high speed.

    The teenager, who was riding the jet ski, was quickly recovered from the water, but died before the rescue boat managed to reach the nearby pier.

    The second


    man, who was sailing a speed boat, was rushed by Southern Health Board ambulance to Cork University Hospital where he was treated for serious injuries to his legs. The dead youth, said to have been in his late teens, was from the Youghal area, but his name was not being released until all members of his family had been informed of the accident, said a garda spokesman. The injured man is also from the Youghal area.

    Volunteers from the local sea rescue organisation were involved in the recovery operation as was an air sea rescue helicopter from

    Waterford which remained on standby but was not needed to fly the injured man to hospital. Sea conditions were said to have been very calm and, while there was other boating activity, the harbour waters were not congested, said a spokesman.


    Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

  • #2
    To revisit this topic...

    Saw a few guys in a RIB doing something very stupid yesterday.
    Eithne was Heading out past the Spit Light in Cork harbour. Roisin was at anchor, and one of the Peacocks was making its way inbound. I spotted this rib circling Eithne as she made her way out the channel. I assumed first it was one of the Navy Ribs, as its not unusual for ships at anchor to send boats ashore with crew etc.
    However it became apparent after a while that the NS seemed uncomfortable with their presence. Next thing on VHF, eithne informs Cork Port Ops that this Rib was acting in an unsafe manner in the channel, and to take note for other outgoing traffic.(the Channel in Cork can be very busy at high water).
    Next thing the same craft leaves Eithne alone, and makes for the Spit Light. This Lighthouse on stilts is owned and operated by the Port of Cork, unlike most Buoys in irish waters. Its about 40 feet high. So one of the individuals on the RIB decides to board the light(which has sat unhindered since about 1853) and climbs the ladder to the beacon.

    Its a nice unguarded ladder, which would be well weathered, and as it was built in 1853, possibly a little slippery. Surprisingly the Individual succeeded in his climb, about the same time as the Pilot Launch, Gleann Mór, arrived requesting that they cease and desist. Individual climbed back into his little boat, and followed Gleann Mór back to Cobh, where I can only assume some sort of warning was given.

    But is it acceptable that the Naval service of this state has to rely on the Workboat of a Private company to enforce the basic rules for prevention of collisions at sea, WHILE IN PORT?
    If the same behaviour that happened around eithne, was witnessed by a visiting foreign warship,Particularly the US in the current climate you can be pretty sure affirmative action would have been administered.


    Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
      But is it acceptable that the Naval service of this state has to rely on the Workboat of a Private company to enforce the basic rules for prevention of collisions at sea, WHILE IN PORT?
      Is there no Garda launch that keeps a watch on Naval vessels entering and departing Port?.

      A similar incident happened down here last year when a moron in a rib decided to constantly cut across the path of QM2 as she departed. A Police Marine Unit and Harbour Master vessel were on him like a ton of bricks and escorted the rib back to Dock for no doubt some serious words.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
        To revisit this topic...

        Saw a few guys in a RIB doing something very stupid yesterday.
        Eithne was Heading out past the Spit Light in Cork harbour. Roisin was at anchor, and one of the Peacocks was making its way inbound. I spotted this rib circling Eithne as she made her way out the channel. I assumed first it was one of the Navy Ribs, as its not unusual for ships at anchor to send boats ashore with crew etc.
        However it became apparent after a while that the NS seemed uncomfortable with their presence. Next thing on VHF, eithne informs Cork Port Ops that this Rib was acting in an unsafe manner in the channel, and to take note for other outgoing traffic.(the Channel in Cork can be very busy at high water).
        Next thing the same craft leaves Eithne alone, and makes for the Spit Light. This Lighthouse on stilts is owned and operated by the Port of Cork, unlike most Buoys in irish waters. Its about 40 feet high. So one of the individuals on the RIB decides to board the light(which has sat unhindered since about 1853) and climbs the ladder to the beacon.

        Its a nice unguarded ladder, which would be well weathered, and as it was built in 1853, possibly a little slippery. Surprisingly the Individual succeeded in his climb, about the same time as the Pilot Launch, Gleann Mór, arrived requesting that they cease and desist. Individual climbed back into his little boat, and followed Gleann Mór back to Cobh, where I can only assume some sort of warning was given.

        But is it acceptable that the Naval service of this state has to rely on the Workboat of a Private company to enforce the basic rules for prevention of collisions at sea, WHILE IN PORT?
        If the same behaviour that happened around eithne, was witnessed by a visiting foreign warship,Particularly the US in the current climate you can be pretty sure affirmative action would have been administered.
        personelly i know what captains of old would have done but with our modern/south mall/ times we live in we are dealing with a civilian craft covered by civilian law crewed by civilians it could be difficult to say what action a warship under way could take unless it was threatened with some form of damage .. the big question is was the Gardai informed of this and did they arrive to question the crew.. if they did not... well it says nothing for our system for dealing with incidents like this.. remember when the whales were in the harbour..

        Comment


        • #5
          There is only one Garda Launch. I think that spends most of its time in the Inland waterways. The RIBs they have are only used by the Sub Aqua unit.
          So the question remains, who is responsible for enforcement of all the many maritime regulations.


          Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

          Comment


          • #6
            I think this sums it up....but like a lot of laws, enforcement is the problem.

            Violation of the any of the provisions of the Merchant Shipping Regulations 2004 may result in an on the spot fine of €127 issued by an Authorised Officer, or prosecution in the District Court.

            Authorised Officers include members of the Gardaí Síochana, Naval Service, Harbour Masters, and members of the Maritime Safety Directorate and the Irish Coast Guard nominated by the Minister.
            No b*stard ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor dumb b*stard die for his country

            Comment


            • #7
              The Port of Cork Company is responsible for the safety of navigation (and its enforcement) in Cork Harbour. Harbours Act 1996. Can be downloaded from the Oireachtas website.
              Once more unto the breach, dear friends

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Saracen View Post
                The Port of Cork Company is responsible for the safety of navigation (and its enforcement) in Cork Harbour. Harbours Act 1996. Can be downloaded from the Oireachtas website.
                There was an incident a few years ago, where a trawler being steered eraticly through Cork Harbour, struck a pier or other vessel and continued on it way. The depudy harbour master took the pilot vessel and went in persuit of the trawler where he succesfully detained the vessel. The trawler skipper was prosecuted through the courts.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Test Pilot View Post
                  There was an incident a few years ago, where a trawler being steered eraticly through Cork Harbour, struck a pier or other vessel and continued on it way. The depudy harbour master took the pilot vessel and went in persuit of the trawler where he succesfully detained the vessel. The trawler skipper was prosecuted through the courts.
                  TP, the same happned here back in 2003 when a dredger " Donald Redford" struck the busy Hythe Pier.

                  The Junior Master was in command at the time of the collision and was found to have consumed a substantial amount of alcohol. He was jailed for 8 months and as the Judge summed up:

                  " If the Hythe ferry had just arrived, the results could have been appalling "

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Doesn't that 1996 Harbours Act provide for the appointment of Harbour Police, with powers of arrest?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by easyrider View Post
                      Doesn't that 1996 Harbours Act provide for the appointment of Harbour Police, with powers of arrest?
                      Here it is!

                      54. —(1) Each of the following companies, namely, Dublin Port Company and Dún Laoghaire Harbour Company shall appoint the members of its staff referred to in subsection (2) and may, if it thinks fit, appoint such other members of its staff as it determines, to police its harbour and exercise the powers referred to in subsection (3) and references in this section to a company's harbour police shall be construed as references to persons appointed by the company under this subsection.

                      (2) The members of staff mentioned in subsection (1) are persons who on the relevant vesting day are transferred under section 38 to Dublin Port Company or Dún Laoghaire Harbour Company, as the case may be, and who immediately before the said day were employed as constables under any enactment by the Dublin Port and Docks Board or the Minister for the Marine in the case of Dún Laoghaire Harbour.

                      ( 3 ) ( a ) Subject to paragraph (b), a member of a company's harbour police may, within the company's harbour, arrest without warrant a person who the member reasonably suspects has committed or is committing an offence under this Act specified in section 6 (1).

                      ( b ) A member of a company's harbour police shall not be entitled to exercise the power referred to in paragraph (a) unless he or she has received (whether before or after the commencement of this section) training and instruction which, in the opinion of the company concerned, after consultation with the Minister, is such as will provide guidance to him or her in the exercise of the said power.

                      ( c ) A company concerned shall endorse on the warrant it furnishes to a member of its harbour police under subsection (4) a statement to the effect that the member has received the training and instruction referred to in paragraph (b).

                      ( d ) Where a member of a company's harbour police arrests a person under paragraph (a) he or she shall, forthwith, deliver the person into the custody of a member of the Garda Síochána to be dealt with according to law.

                      ( e ) The arrest of a person under paragraph (a) shall not prejudice the re-arrest under statute or otherwise of that person by a member of the Garda Síochána, an officer of Customs and Excise or any other person.

                      ( f ) A member of a company's harbour police may accompany the harbour master of the company's harbour in the entry by him or her (or a person authorised by him or her under section 37 (1) (b) to make such an entry) into a ship under section 14 (5) or 49 (1).

                      ( g ) A person who obstructs or impedes a member of a company's harbour police in making an arrest under paragraph (a) or while such a member is accompanying a harbour master or another person under paragraph (f) shall be guilty of an offence.

                      (4) A person who is appointed by a company as a member of its harbour police shall, on his or her appointment, be furnished by the company with a warrant of his or her appointment as such a member.

                      (5) The appointment of a person as a member of a company's harbour police may be revoked at any time by the company if it appears to it that the person has been guilty of any misconduct or neglect of duty.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Similar to AIR NAVIGATION AND TRANSPORT ACT, 1993 which cover airport byelaw's which allows for provision of Airport Police and also issueing of warrant cards to other key staff also provides for byelaw's/legislation to used to prosecute persons that breaks them.

                        BMax
                        British officer: You're seven minutes late, Mr. Collins.
                        Michael Collins: You've kept us waiting 700 years. You can have your seven minutes.

                        [As the British flag comes down]

                        Michael Collins: So that's what all the bother was about.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Bye Laws being the effective phrase.
                          Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            "The second man, who was sailing a speed boat" - erm..... odd phraseology.

                            Time for all water craft to have licences and training. While it is always sad for someone to die, personal watercraft are too accessible and are the bane or other water users.
                            Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. Margaret Mead

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Possibly worth mentioning that the Harbour Police in Dublin Port have recently been replaced by a private contract security company.

                              There is Approved training for all those intending to use watercraft,As Approved by the RYA,however there is nothing to force those with enough money to buy a powerful boat, from doing any training, apart from the fact that they'll get a slight reduction in their insurance, should they chose to get insurance.
                              Goldie fish
                              Tim Horgan
                              Last edited by Goldie fish; 16 April 2008, 19:33.


                              Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

                              Comment

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