Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Satellite error caused delay in search for boat

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Test Pilot
    replied
    Sorry Guys, €3.50 is for a portable ships radio licence.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnny no stars
    replied
    http://www.comreg.ie/_fileupload/pub...mReg0213R2.pdf


    Notes for Applicants

    3. From 1st September 2006, Ships Radio Licence will be issued for the lifetime of the vessel. The
    fee for a Lifetime Licence is €100.00. A Lifetime Licence is only valid on the condition that the
    Licensee stated on the licence and the owner of the named vessel is the same person.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnny no stars
    replied
    Originally posted by Test Pilot View Post
    Nope! €3.50.
    Are you sure that's not just the commercial cost?


    I'm fairly certain that for non-commercial vessels they raised it very recently to 100 euro.

    Leave a comment:


  • Goldie fish
    replied
    Originally posted by hedgehog View Post
    3.50 for working class

    100 for posh people because the posh licence is on vellum and monks from Glenstal abbey enscribe it
    More ignorance from Mr Hog on nautical matters.













    Glenstal Lost the contract some time ago. Mount Mellary have it now.

    Leave a comment:


  • hedgehog
    replied
    3.50 for working class

    100 for posh people because the posh licence is on vellum and monks from Glenstal abbey enscribe it

    Leave a comment:


  • Test Pilot
    replied
    Originally posted by johnny no stars View Post
    100 euro
    Nope! €3.50.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnny no stars
    replied
    100 euro

    Leave a comment:


  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    I can get a radio station license for an aircraft for about E8. How much is it for a boat?
    regards
    GttC

    Leave a comment:


  • johnny no stars
    replied
    Originally posted by Victor View Post
    The board’s report recommends the “urgent” initiation through legislation of a register of EPIRBs, including those owned personally, along with a matching database.
    :confused:

    You mean, like, having a list of registered boats that say, have such a thing as a radio license that might just have details of their EPIRB on it...:confused:

    But there is also the possibility that I've completely misunderstood that line, though.

    Maybe they should look more towards reducing the extortionate cost of licensing and should do some random checks on boats - on the water - to check documentation and SOLAS V compliance. Then people might get the finger out about safety.

    Leave a comment:


  • Test Pilot
    replied
    I have come across vessels, mainly in the leasure sector, that have carried EPIRB's registered to former owners, sometimes in other countries. Some were gong back two or three years.

    Leave a comment:


  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    A few years back, whilst I was on night-shift, for the Former State Airline, a call was put thru from RAF Lossiemouth, to the effect that an ELT had been heard on 121.5, which was registered to one of our aircraft. We knew that only our A330s were airborne so an ACARS message was sent to each, to confirm that each of their ELTs was silent.Each one confirmed in turn.We called Lossiemouth and told them this.They called back later to say that an ELT registered to one of our grounded Fokkers, parked in Holland at the manufacturers, had gone off in mid-Atlantic.It turned out that one of the ELTs had been used to replace a defunct unit on a different aircraft but the unit change had not been registered with any SAR agency.It turned out to be an inadvertant activation, in the end but it did highlight how these units could fall out of accurate record-tracking.
    regards
    GttC

    Leave a comment:


  • Test Pilot
    replied
    Originally posted by Tadpole View Post
    Atleast since 1 Feb all ELTs must have 406 with position information. Even registered to the wrong boat it will still give an immediate position that SAR services can be sent to.
    Yes, that is correct. We would routinely keep a record of all units programmed here and would always insist on a copy of the radio call signs / MMSI number before programing.

    However, regardless of the information transmitted from the EPIRB,the position will be accurate, complete with homer.

    There are issues to be addressed regarding the data base access for EPIRBS and equally important, a data base for PLB's (Personel Locator Beacons), which at the moment is not available to all users.

    A submission was submitted by us before Christmas to the department, regarding legislation on the use of PLB's. But we eargely await the response.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tadpole
    replied
    Atleast since 1 Feb all ELTs must have 406 with position information. Even registered to the wrong boat it will still give an immediate position that SAR services can be sent to.

    Leave a comment:


  • Victor
    started a topic Satellite error caused delay in search for boat

    Satellite error caused delay in search for boat

    Title is misleading, but there's an important message.

    Full report http://www.mcib.ie/reports/?thisid=1931

    -------------------------------------------------------

    Satellite error caused delay in search for boat
    LORNA SIGGINS, Marine Correspondent

    AN INACCURATE coding on a satellite distress beacon caused a significant delay to the search and rescue of seven crew from an Irish fishing vessel, according to the official inquiry.

    The Marine Casualty Investigation Board’s report into the loss of the MFV Discovery off the southwest Irish coast two years ago concludes that the crew of seven owe their lives to the fact that the incident occurred in daylight and calm seas.

    The vessel’s emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) did begin transmitting when the boat capsized off the southwest on January 29th, 2007. However, the transmission was traced initially to a completely different boat, which was tied up in port in Arklow, Co Wicklow.

    The Irish Coast Guard was able to resolve the position for the signal and diverted an Air Corps Casa fishery patrol aircraft to the sea area to search.

    Some two hours and 20 minutes after the first satellite alert, the Air Corps sighted a life raft and debris. However, the patrol aircraft was not equipped for a sea rescue of this type. A further 90 minutes after that, an oil tanker in the area, MT Commander, picked up all seven men and treated them to reduce the risk of hypothermia.

    The board’s report recommends the “urgent” initiation through legislation of a register of EPIRBs, including those owned personally, along with a matching database.

    It also found that none of the crew had been wearing personal flotation devices when working on deck before the capsize, during loading of a catch.

    A worker on board owed his life to the “selfless action” of a crewman who gave up his lifejacket for him, it notes.

    The board says that the service agent for the EPIRB distress beacon had a “casual procedure” for recording call signs matching to particular boats, when the beacons were submitted for servicing or encoding.

    It says that this has been “rectified with a more formal procedure”.


    http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/...867937320.html
    Last edited by Victor; 16 February 2009, 00:57.
Working...
X