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What are Navies for these days?

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  • What are Navies for these days?

    Interesting article in the US Naval Institute Proceedings, giving the views of 37 naval commanders-in-chief around the world as to what are the most important maritime security threats at the moment: http://www.usni.org/magazines/procee...?STORY_ID=1808

    Some examples:

    Vice Admiral R. H. Crane
    Chief of Navy, Australia


    Australia is an island nation in one of the most maritime-intensive domains in the world. Our ability to use the sea is central to the protection of Australia's national interests. As a nation with no land borders, our dependence on the oceans, from both an economic and security perspective, has continued to develop. Our maritime-dominated strategic geography therefore presents us with unique challenges. We continue to rely on the maritime environment for economic prosperity, both for natural resources and as the fundamental highway for our trade. In economic terms, 99.7 percent of Australia's international trade by volume and 75 percent by value was transported by sea in 2008. Australia's continued reliance on the maritime environment will dominate our thinking.

    One of the most significant maritime security challenges facing Australia is the strategic vulnerability of our maritime economic trade over extended sea lines of communication. The long distances over which Australia must secure its trade and raw resource base presents significant challenges to Australian naval forces in applying traditional concepts, such as sea control, in planning for any application of maritime power. The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) seeks to secure our maritime trade base through application of both soft and hard power with our involvement in allied and regional naval engagement. This helps us develop understanding, transparency, and confidence building and, if required, gives us options to work with allies and friends in the considered and precise application of maritime power to exert sea control.

    The RAN places a high priority on contributing to international efforts through active middle power diplomacy. One of the most important ways that we seek to promote mutual strategic interest is through a network of alliances. These alliances reinforce stable strategic frameworks in our immediate neighborhood as well as the wider Asia Pacific and Indian Ocean regions and assist in reducing potential threats. Australia continues to develop a network of naval partnerships as an important foundation for navies to work together if and when required to ensure potential threats to our maritime trade are mitigated.

    Assisting in our regional engagement endeavors is our overt joint force approach, which provisions and sustains a balanced fleet postured through a two-ocean basing policy. As part of a joint force, the RAN is structured to apply maritime power, when required, to maintain freedom of navigation thereby preserve the integrity of sea-lanes vital to Australia. This is enabled by a continued focus on the use of submarines and major surface combatants, and, in the future, our air-warfare destroyers. Operating in the amphibious environment with land forces with our soon-to-be-introduced amphibious assault ships will allow us to respond to any shore-based contingency when required.


    Rear Admiral Jean-Paul Robyns
    Commander, Belgian Maritime Component


    Belgium is a maritime nation with a merchant fleet ranked 22nd in the world in tonnage and having 75 percent of its trade move by sea. This trade has grown exponentially in recent years, and it goes without saying that energy shortages will accentuate it. Safe sea lines of communication and ports, primarily Zeebruges and Antwerp, will become more than ever a key factors to our country's economic survival.

    The rise of piracy and terrorism is a genuine threat to the freedom of the seas, making investment in maritime security paramount. I strongly believe that our navies in years to come will play a major role and maritime security operations will gain importance.

    To prepare for this mission, my navy started a transformation by acquiring multi-purpose frigates, modernizing our minehunters, and investing in very-shallow-water tactics and materiel. The new frigates constitute a major step forward for the Belgian Navy. Compared to the former E71 class, these ships are of a higher technical standard, with far better sensors, improved weapon and self-defense systems, and most important, helicopter capacity. We will embark the new NH90 helicopter. The frigates are multi-role and can engage in every scenario, including maritime security operations. In 2009 the Leopold I will participate in UN Interim Forces in Lebanon (UNIFIL) with an embarked staff as we take command of the Maritime Task Force (MTF) from 1 March. The Louise-Marie will join Operation Atalanta in August, in the fight against piracy.

    To improve our mine warfare capacity, we are engaged in a capability upkeep program—to be completed in mid-year—that includes a new command-and-control system, a self-propelled variable-depth sonar, a new hull-mounted sonar, and the Seafox mine disposal system. The first operational evaluations appear very promising. At sea, the hunters are supported by a command and support ship that will be replaced in 2015.

    Furthermore, we are investing in a very-shallow-water antimine capacity with the Remus countermeasure system and divers. This system is under evaluation and should be augmented by other systems in the future.

    Finally, we opened a new Maritime Information Centre at the Zeebruges Naval Base that focuses on all security aspects of our home waters. It is an interagency operation with colleagues from the police and Customs Department.

    I believe that the Belgian Navy is taking adequate steps to counter the threat to our maritime security. This threat, combined with the drastically growing demand for energy and budgetary restraints, will make cooperation among navies a high priority. What we do together, we do better.


    Rear Admiral Nils Christian Wang
    Admiral, Danish Fleet


    Denmark is heavily engaged in furthering peace and security across the world. We are ready to share responsibilities and risks, making international operations a prime task of the Danish armed forces. In addition, we are a significant maritime nation with strong regional, Arctic, and global interests and a very substantial merchant navy. Thus, the very complex, dynamic, diffuse, and unpredictable security environment, armed conflict, instability, transnational security issues, terrorism, piracy, access to and flow of resources, and climate change all pose threats, challenges, and risks with local, regional, or even global implications.

    This can only be addressed through close multilateral cooperation, a dedicated effort, a wide-range of capabilities, and a comprehensive approach. The Royal Danish Navy has been heavily engaged across the full expanse of operations, most recently from Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, UN World Food Program, UNIFIL off Lebanon, to Task Force 150, where Commander Danish Task Group, from his flagship HDMS Absalon, took command from September 2008 to January 2009. This mission has clearly proven the Danish Task Group concept as well as the capacity of the multipurpose ships of the Absalon-class, with embarked armed helicopter and Special Forces with their rigid-hull inflatable boats (RHIBs).

    On numerous occasions HDMS Absalon—in cooperation with coalition forces—prevented pirate attacks in the Gulf of Aden, and on two specific occasions pirates were detained on board the Danish flagship. Piracy has serious implications on free trade and maritime security as such, and the lack of a legal framework for prosecuting pirates poses challenges. Furthermore, piracy and maritime crime should also be addressed ashore through capacity building and other long-term measures. Long-term solutions depend on the ability of all coastal nations to establish and maintain the necessary degree of maritime security in their own waters. This is why capacity building has to be an essential part of our common effort in furthering world maritime security. As a major seafaring nation, Denmark takes a specific interest in this area, and we are ready to do our part.

    On a daily basis, the Royal Danish Navy is engaged in Arctic waters around Greenland, where climate change might have significant geostrategic, environmental, security, and safety implications; in Danish waters, where one of the busiest international chokepoints puts special attention on maritime domain awareness; and, when needed, in trouble spots around the globe, together with our allies and partners.

    The navy is thus an important part of an active foreign and security policy, safeguarding our interests from the sea, if necessary by force. It requires a wide range of effective, flexible, deployable, well-equipped, and well-trained capabilities ready to deal with the threats and challenges where they emerge. With the Absalon-class multipurpose ships, our patrol frigates, and incoming high-end frigates as well as other assets, we are on the right track in being even more able to address the challenges, from humanitarian missions over capacity building and constabulary tasks to high-intensity operations.

  • #2
    ireland (statement would run along the lines of )

    we have a contract in place with our european nighbours which will allow us to purchase a naval battle group at reduced rates in the event of a crisis.
    The money not spent on boats will be used to buy cows and horses and things like that , Are we going for a pint or what .

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by spud68 View Post
      ireland (statement would run along the lines of )

      we have a contract in place with our european nighbours which will allow us to purchase a naval battle group at reduced rates in the event of a crisis.
      The money not spent on boats will be used to buy cows and horses and things like that , Are we going for a pint or what .
      Good point. I'ts times like these the country should be looking at what the sea has to offer in terms of economic opportunities. Part of this involves the government taking our navy seriously.

      Comment


      • #4
        That's not very fair spud. Have you been carrying hedgehogs chip by any chance?


        Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hedgehog , Goldie says I have to give you back your chip.

          ok maybe a little bit unfair ,

          however compare the statements and the force projections from the countries above with irelands .
          bearing the above in mind do we have a plan to place a realisitic martime force in place to police and protect the irish coast.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
            That's not very fair spud. Have you been carrying hedgehogs chip by any chance?
            I have a great respect for Our Navy

            and its personnel

            great job shitty conditions
            Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
            Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
            The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere***
            The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
            The best lack all conviction, while the worst
            Are full of passionate intensity.

            Comment


            • #7
              Navy badly needed and look at the amount of at-sea days ! more to come I don't doubt.
              "Are they trying to shoot down the other drone? "

              "No, they're trying to fly the tank"

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by spud68 View Post
                Hedgehog , Goldie says I have to give you back your chip.

                ok maybe a little bit unfair ,

                however compare the statements and the force projections from the countries above with irelands .
                bearing the above in mind do we have a plan to place a realisitic martime force in place to police and protect the irish coast.
                Do you read any of the other threads here? At the moment, Government near sightedness has tied us into an 8 ship fleet, at least for another year. However there are clear plans in place to increase the fleet, and where it can deploy, for the next White Paper on Defence. Are you forgetting that our Navy has been bringing stores overseas since the early 80s? Have you forgotton that L.E. Roisin was the first Naval vessel in theater when the highly successful liberian operation took place?
                The leadership of the Naval Service have a plan in place to provide larger ships, capable of going further, specifically to support Irish troops overseas, if required.


                Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
                  Do you read any of the other threads here? At the moment, Government near sightedness has tied us into an 8 ship fleet, at least for another year. However there are clear plans in place to increase the fleet, and where it can deploy, for the next White Paper on Defence. Are you forgetting that our Navy has been bringing stores overseas since the early 80s? Have you forgotton that L.E. Roisin was the first Naval vessel in theater when the highly successful liberian operation took place?
                  The leadership of the Naval Service have a plan in place to provide larger ships, capable of going further, specifically to support Irish troops overseas, if required.

                  Maybe the Naval Service should also be looking beyond the task of supporting the Army overseas? There are a number of purely maritime international forces now conducting operations, the most high-profile being anti-piracy work off the coast of Somalia. As has been mentioned on other threads, our Naval Service should be enabled and allowed to take part in these deployments. OPVs - preferably helicopter-carrying - seem to be ideal vessels for this type of work.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    As an ex naval service type, I think the Navy have scarcely enough resources to do the job they have without f%$king off into the Indian ocean or where ever for weeks on end, to the detriment of their families.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Exactly, we are a long long way off being able to police our own waters let alone someone elses. And although the Navy has benn bringing stores overseas since the 80s how often has it happened in the last 10 years? Once? The blue-green ship is a badly needed asset as is a heli-capable PV but sadly I cant see it happening anytime soon.
                      "Never believe anything in politics until it has been officially denied."

                      Otto Von Bismark

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I think goldie you misunderstood the comment is aimed at goverment .YOu actual agree with me in thinking the goverment is nearsighted.

                        My comment's are not a reflection of the navy having served in it and having many friend's in it I know well what it is up to and how well it has coped with lacking the kit to do the job .

                        I know many fine naval officers and ratings who have with vision and skill made the service more than the sum of its outdated parts .

                        I know the eternal battle the navy has to gain equipment from a goverment who I feel do not understand the martime area and requirements.

                        The leadership of the navy or the navy's ability was never in question.

                        .

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I think the man deserves an apology GF

                          and me as well for the chip on my shoulder remark
                          Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
                          Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
                          The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere***
                          The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
                          The best lack all conviction, while the worst
                          Are full of passionate intensity.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by easyrider View Post
                            Maybe the Naval Service should also be looking beyond the task of supporting the Army overseas? There are a number of purely maritime international forces now conducting operations, the most high-profile being anti-piracy work off the coast of Somalia. As has been mentioned on other threads, our Naval Service should be enabled and allowed to take part in these deployments. OPVs - preferably helicopter-carrying - seem to be ideal vessels for this type of work.
                            Pakistan, Turkey, Israel, Bangladesh, and a number of other navies are interested in Turkey's new corvette, known as Milgem. Cost is expected to be around $250 million each. This corvette is being designed for littoral operations similar to the US Navy's Lockheed's LCS, a replacement for the US Navy's frigate force. Google Milgem, I really do think this is what Ireland can use as their first rate naval ships, say two or three, along with their Roisins as their second rate ships.

                            To finish the fleet I would prefer a few third rate ships similar to the Australian Armidale class. New Zealand was able to buy 4 similar sized IPVs for $100 million. An idea Irish Naval fleet in my humble opinion would be 2 Milgems, 2 Roisins, and 4 Armidales.
                            Last edited by Sea Toby; 10 March 2009, 18:05.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'd love to see the army greatly reduced in size(why do we need a force so big,whem only a fraction of it is ever deployed at one time?)
                              and the millions saved on wages and the many barracks we no longer need spent on expanding the IAC and the navy,with the whole lot styled on a force more like the USMC with an expeditionary force capable of humanitarian work/peace keeping thats air mobile and backed up by a reasonably sized flotilla

                              Comment

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