Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

hms endurance

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    But do you think it is wise to hammer a square peg into a round hole?

    The level of use that Naval vessels are put through are for the most part at a much higher tempo than that of a comparable civilian vessel. Indeed Endurance spends the Antarctic winter in the Northern Hemisphere, and usually makes the transit south in august or september. The same would not be the case if she were civilian operated.
    Could you see a North Sea support ship being sent to operate off the south American oilfields when the North Sea weather gets too bad?


    Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
      But do you think it is wise to hammer a square peg into a round hole?

      The level of use that Naval vessels are put through are for the most part at a much higher tempo than that of a comparable civilian vessel. Indeed Endurance spends the Antarctic winter in the Northern Hemisphere, and usually makes the transit south in august or september. The same would not be the case if she were civilian operated.
      Could you see a North Sea support ship being sent to operate off the south American oilfields when the North Sea weather gets too bad?
      watch next week when all goes down the plug hole hope they learnt something from those exercises in the ice

      Comment


      • #18
        I disagree with you that naval vessel are put to work at a much higher tempo than civilian vessel's

        having served in both, the merchant ships are much harder work and in general pushed harder than naval vessel's .

        I always looked forward to the MOD jobs as we can relax and there is no pressure when working with the MOD and US DOD , sadly these contracts are now no longer available in the company i work for now .

        I have served on a vessel who had not been into any port in over a year supply and crew were taken out to the vessel as she worked I dont know of any warship which has done that.

        The British Antartic Survey vessel civilian manned also works the summer in the north sea and then heads south about the same time as the RN.

        As for a north sea vessel who could only operate in the north sea in the summer would not hold her contract for very long or indeed even get the contract in the first place, vessel's do move around but mainly to fill commericial contract's.

        As for square peg in round whole placeing an icebreaker to do an antartic patrol dose not really apply.

        anyway looking forward to the next week's program

        Comment


        • #19
          I have to say luck was with them, after seeing the final episode. With a short stubby hull like that, once she started rolling taking wave side on, it would have only been a matter of time before she went over.

          I have loads of questions about her watertight compartments though...


          Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

          Comment


          • #20
            UK examines Endurance alternatives
            The UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) is examining long-term options for maintaining an ice patrol capability in the Antarctic in light of the serious flood damage sustained by HMS Endurance off Chile in late 2008. With repairs to the 19-year-old Class 1 icebreaker estimated at approximately GBP30 million (USD50 million), it appears increasingly likely that officials will look instead to purchase or lease a replacement ice-capable vessel

            [first posted to http://jni.janes.com - 12 November 2009]
            "Why am I using a new putter? Because the last one didn't float too well." -Craig Stadler

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by gaff85 View Post
              UK examines Endurance alternatives
              The UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) is examining long-term options for maintaining an ice patrol capability in the Antarctic in light of the serious flood damage sustained by HMS Endurance off Chile in late 2008. With repairs to the 19-year-old Class 1 icebreaker estimated at approximately GBP30 million (USD50 million), it appears increasingly likely that officials will look instead to purchase or lease a replacement ice-capable vessel

              [first posted to http://jni.janes.com - 12 November 2009]

              I wonder if Endurance will become a victim of the Defence cuts at present. HMS Scott has taken her place at the moment. You have to ask yourself will the MoD front the money to repair a 20 year old vessel?

              The RN said it was its intention to repair the ship, but will it happen.

              Comment


              • #22
                I suspect that we have seen the last Hms Endurance....

                The HS Squadron has already been hit by the loss of Hms Roebuck, soft option for cuts. I would imagine Hms Gleaner is a goner too...

                Can't believe they have binned another minesweeper.
                'History is a vast early warning system'. Norman Cousins

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by spider View Post

                  I would imagine Hms Gleaner is a goner too...
                  She is certainly a lot less maintenance than other vessels. Gleaner may still be around for awhile.

                  safety and security issues are the responsibility of the Home Secretary within UK waters and Gleaner will be a part of this. So it's quite possible the Home Office jointly fund such vessels
                  that the RN provides support too.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Well I hope so, but given the choice between her and something else I would say off with her head !!

                    I would rather see Gleaner go than some of the URN Units.

                    What is going to replace the Archer Class ????

                    I would bet Atlantic RIBS
                    'History is a vast early warning system'. Norman Cousins

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by spider View Post
                      Well I hope so, but given the choice between her and something else I would say off with her head !!

                      I would rather see Gleaner go than some of the URN Units.

                      What is going to replace the Archer Class ????

                      I would bet Atlantic RIBS
                      Good pont

                      I often see Blazer being it's the Southampton URN vessel.

                      Saying that, have you ever seen the size of the MOD Police fleet, they have a maritime capability of 50 vessels

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        New Antarctic patrol ship announced

                        22 March 2011
                        THERE’LL be a new Protector of the frozen continent this winter as the Navy tries out a possible replacement for HMS Endurance.


                        HMS Protector – upholding the famous name of the 1950s and 60s Antarctic survey vessel – is being loaned on a three-year trial with the Fleet while the long-term future of the Red Plum is considered.

                        Since Endurance almost foundered off Chile during a flooding accident in late 2008, HMS Scott has been filling in as ice patrol ship. Her hull is not as strong as Endurance’s – nor does Scott possess a flight deck.

                        Whitehall wants to continue the Senior Service’s Antarctic mission – updating charts, supporting the British Antarctic Survey, monitoring wildlife and maintaining Britain’s presence in the South Atlantic.

                        The vessel it has plumped for is the Norwegian icebreaker MV Polarbjørn – Polar Bear – is a commercial icebreaker normally based in Bergen, but which has been operating most recently in the Caribbean.

                        Defence Minister Lord Astor said that Polarbjørn – to be renamed HMS Protector – would “provide the interim replacement ice patrol ship capability for at least the next three years while we consider the long-term future of HMS Endurance.”

                        The Red Plum was brought back to Portsmouth on a transporter vessel and remains in the naval base awaiting her fate.

                        Lord Astor said the Navy had still to decide whether the ice patrol ship’s mission could best be performed in the long term by a repaired Endurance – or whether she should be replaced.

                        Her interim replacement is a commercial icebreaker normally based in Bergen, but which has been operating most recently in the Caribbean.
                        Completed in 2001 and displacing 4,985 tons, she can act as a polar research ship or subsea support vessel, and has 100 berths.

                        She is around 1,000 tons smaller than Endurance but, unlike the current stand-in HMS Scott, she has a flight deck – though as that currently sits atop the bridge roof there may be a need to modify the ship’s configuration for Royal Navy operations in the far south.

                        Polarbjørn is expected in Portsmouth in May to be fitted with specialist military equipment required for her deployments.

                        Her owner, GC Rieber, also owns the scientific support ship RRS Ernest Shackleton, currently chartered to the British Antarctic Survey.

                        As for the ship’s new name, it is taken from the sixth HMS Protector which completed 13 Antarctic ‘seasons’ between 1955 and 1968.

                        She was launched in 1936 as a netlayer, seeing service in the North Sea, Atlantic and Mediterranean in World War 2 before being badly damaged by an aerial torpedo and undergoing major repairs in Bombay.

                        Protector was placed in reserve, but converted to take up duties as ice patrol ship in the early 1950s.

                        She was paid off in May 1968 to be replaced by HMS Endurance (the current Endurance’s predecessor), and finally scrapped in Scotland in 1970.



                        http://www.navynews.co.uk/news/1122-...announced.aspx


                        Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          You'd wonder if the original Captain got the shove, so as to big up the 2 Ic's role and give him a leg-up? I wonder if the actual captain is being punished by default, for something over which he had no control. What is he doing these days?
                          regards
                          GttC

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Her interim replacement is a commercial icebreaker normally based in Bergen, but which has been operating most recently in the Caribbean.
                            ?????????

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by DeV View Post
                              ?????????
                              She also carries out subsea work. So Artic work is no her only function.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                10 years after this incident that almost saw the sinking of an RN asset, the captain of the vessel at the time has written about the incident, and how effectively the crew dealt with it. For a time it was almost inevitable that the ship would sink, but crew actions prevented this.
                                As we say, "good drills".

                                https://wavellroom.com/2018/12/16/ma...hms-endurance/
                                On arriving at the bridge, the first thing I noticed was the number of people staring at the engine room monitors. By the time I sat in my chair they were all staring at me. When I looked at the monitors, I could see a geyser-sized jet of water just off to the left and people rushing towards it with damage control equipment, a sight that will never leave me. The incident had been underway for less than two minutes and already the water was up to their knees. My first thought was “if we don’t stop that, this ship is going to sink”. My first statement, in the calmest voice I could muster, was “take the ship to emergency stations”. This triggered a number of pre-programmed responses, thankfully none of which included staring at me anymore.
                                For now, everything hangs on the CoDF report, which is published, but after discussion with parties in government will probably commence being implemented in May or June.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X