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L.E. Niamh ship leaves Cork to establish Liberia base

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  • #31
    One reason may be that we don't have 4 or 5 tanks to transport..........

    IAS

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    • #32
      Number of tanks = 0

      CVRT's might be a different matter...
      .
      .
      .
      With 50,000 men getting killed a week, who's going to miss a pigeon?

      Guns don't kill people, bullets kill people.

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      • #33
        Collins english dictionary:
        pedantic(noun): yellowjacket.


        Without discussint the need for troop transport, surely after being involved in Overseas missions for 40 odd years its about time it was realised that a ship suited to a minimum level of logistics support is required? When not deployed it could provide a valuable training asset to both Naval and merchant cadets and recruits,much in the same way as the RFA ships are crewed.
        Time we looked beyond fisheries protection as the only use for Irish naval vessels.

        I did notice the amount of free deck space on the newer ships though. Lots of open deck spaces. They are unusually beamy for ships of this type also...


        Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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        • #34
          Exactly YJ and by the way the DF have 14 CVRTs.


          IAS

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          • #35
            Yes and get we get all that equipment in 8 days so we can "deploy" our mission.

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            • #36
              I have read in a few Nautical publications that Piracy is on the increase in this,and other areas. Indeed NUMAST( National Union of Master Mariners) are demanding a Royal Navy anty Piracy patrol.
              I Know that on her trip to the far east,Niamh had in place special precautions to deter piracy.
              Keep them eyes peeled...thaar be pirates on the horizon lad...


              Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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              • #37
                I reckon its making an acceptable use of limited resources, but getting back to Bravo's point about the US fleet providing protection, and given that most rapid reaction deployments will be done in weeks rather than days.
                How feasible might it be to use a merchant vessel to transport an RRF unit and/or heavy stores to a conflict area such as Liberia, and rely on a friendly fleet for protection in the AO?
                The NS could still provide personell or an escort vessel to give the minimum level of protection against piracy.
                Or would it still be better to rely on hired air transport?
                How are AFVs shipped out normally (By us)
                "It is a general popular error to imagine that loudest complainers for the public to be the most anxious for it's welfare" Edmund Burke

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                • #38
                  The NS are providing protection for the recce team that is deciding on whether or not we will take part in the operation. It is not staying for the entire 6 months.

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                  • #39
                    The US are not providing protection. They expected to have all their naval assets out by last week.


                    Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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                    • #40
                      Surely there is still a military naval presence there to suppor thte UN mission, even if its not as illustrious?
                      "It is a general popular error to imagine that loudest complainers for the public to be the most anxious for it's welfare" Edmund Burke

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                      • #41
                        yeah looks like Ireland is providing the naval protection.

                        The nigerian navy leaves something to be desired and is mainly intrested in patroling some dis puted oil areas with the Ivory coast.

                        The Nigerians had a couple of VT frigates but these fell in to disrepair and have been laid up for some time.They did purchase some fast attack craft fro Italy a while back ...but for NGS these would be very limited although probably superior in Fire power to the niamh.
                        Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

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                        • #42
                          It was common practice in UNIFIL days to strap a Panhard M3 or 2 on the aft deck of a naval resupply vessel,emer left Cork equipped in such a way many a time..
                          Must have been interesting to see a naval vessel with 2 90mm guns as secondary armament when the AML was being carried though:D

                          In the first half of 2003 west africa suffered at least 20 reported incidents of piracy. To the north of sierra leone,Guinea capital Conakry and Senegals Dakar have been identified as areas susceptable to piracy.
                          Further south, the Ivory Coasts Abidjan is affected by piracy. Nigeria has had trouble with insurgent operatingin the River Niger's massive delta west of Port Harcourt and the capital Lagos is also prone to Piracy.
                          Neighbouring Cameroon and equatorial Guinea have seen a rise in piracy in the Bight of Bonny and off the island of Bioko.

                          According to Warships IFR magazine, None of the Regions navies have the capability to enforce maritime security. Liberia has no maritime protection at all, while Sierra Leone's few patrol boats are confined to the waters off Freetown.
                          Senegal has several French supplied coastal patrol boats but most are designed for inshore work.
                          Cabo Verde no longer maintains a Navy and its coastguard has just two vessels.
                          The only relatively formidable naval power in the region,Nigeria is resoursce starved with 50 ships keeping an eye on Cameroon as the pair have come to blows in the past over the disputed Oil Rich Bakassi peninsula,at the mount of Nigerias Cross River.

                          During a recent visit to a USMC base in California,President Bush said:
                          we have a special obligation to Liberia to help with humanitarian aid and therefore we will...we will have a limited mission of limited duration and limited scope. We'll be out of there by October 1
                          Last edited by Farel'; 17 October 2003, 03:33.
                          Fail to prepare....prepare to FAIL!

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                          • #43
                            So they are gone then?

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                            • #44
                              We're on our own..

                              Iwo Jima ARG Leaves Liberia, Rota Marines Stay
                              Story Number: NNS031014-07
                              Release Date: 10/14/2003 9:56:00 AM



                              By Lt. Corey Barker, Naval Station Rota Public Affairs

                              ROTA, Spain (NNS) -- Three amphibious assault ships, USS Nashville (LPD 13), USS Carter Hall (LSD 50) and USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), pulled into U.S. Naval Station Rota, Spain, after spending two months off the coast of Liberia, providing peacekeeping support in the Capital city of Monrovia.

                              The ships and the embarked 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) are on their way home after nearly eight months at sea. The ships moored in Rota to conduct an equipment wash-down, and take some much-needed liberty before getting underway.

                              Although the Joint Task Force Liberia mission is complete for the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group, 55 Marines and Sailors from Marine Corps Security Force Company Europe, based at U.S. Naval Station Rota, Spain, remain in Monrovia providing security at the U.S. Embassy.

                              These Marines and Sailors, from 1st Platoon, are specifically trained and equipped to provide security for U.S. embassies, vital naval installations and ships in the region. They are also on standby to support any other contingency operation as directed by Commander, U. S. Naval Forces Europe.

                              The first security team from Rota was sent to the U.S. Embassy in Monrovia, July 7. A second team was sent the following week.

                              After facing combat in Northern Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom, the 26th MEU was urgently dispatched to the coast of Liberia aboard the Iwo Jima ARG in July to support peacekeeping efforts there.

                              According to the 26th MEU Public Affairs Officer, Capt. James Jarvis, "Multi-national peacekeeping forces from the Economic Community of West African States have established a secure zone which have allowed humanitarian operations in Liberia to proceed." Because of this, the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group was able to leave the region and return to homeport.

                              Col. Andrew P. Frick, commanding officer of the 26th MEU, said, "We provided a stabilizing presence which allowed the multinational forces from other Western African countries to come in and handle the problem regionally."

                              Just the presence of the ships and Marines made a difference in efforts to restore peace in Liberia. "When you see the Iwo Jima, the Nashville and Carter Hall off the coastline, it shows that the American public cares and that there is a definite military presence," Frick said. The U.S. ships looming on the horizon, along with the helicopters and jets flying overhead, reassured the humanitarian relief organizations and African peacekeeping forces that it was safe to go back to work.


                              [URL=http://www.news.navy.mil/management/photodb/webphoto/web_030811-N-2954M-014.jpg]

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                              • #45
                                When did the Dauphin stop Ops with the Eithne? You telling me we have a HPV and no Heli anymore?

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