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  • Future Ship Concepts

    Came across this:

    http://www.ddxnationalteam.com/

    which is the programme for the next class of US Navy Destroyers, it certainly looks to be big advance in ship design.

    What form are the next batch of Irish ships likely to take?
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    With 50,000 men getting killed a week, who's going to miss a pigeon?

    Guns don't kill people, bullets kill people.

  • #2
    Its no surprise when I say that the next generation of Naval vessels will probably be similar to the RN River class PV,more specifically VT Groups EEZ Management vessel.

    This would seem to be able to carry out many of our current roles,and considering the demise of Appledore,the builders of the excellent P50 Class,I doubt we would see more of her type.

    The ship was designed by
    MASA Marine who has built successfully for the USCG,among other agencies. Their website is an insight into current construction trends,remembering that our NS is a Naval service in name only,their role being that of a Coastguard force.

    Rather than sensor or weapon fit,the future of our vessels will centre around hull design that will allow higher speeds in heavy seas,greater crew comfort,and greater automation.

    It depends also on Government policy(Remember that on 2 occasions in the NS short history,the service almost ceased to exist),but I believe the option of a large vessel dedicated to the carriage of vehicles and supplies to overseas missions,and training of crew during other times could be considered.

    Sadly I doubt we will see AEGIS or Stealth technology being used in irish service in the forseeable future,but I would Love to be proved wrong on this.


    Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Goldie fish
      Sadly I doubt we will see AEGIS or Stealth technology being used in irish service in the forseeable future,but I would Love to be proved wrong on this.
      LE Roisín and Niamh have a reduced radar cross section ("equivalent to a small trawler"). Concealing all the deck gear and equipment (fewer edges, surfaces like on a La Fayette class frigate httphttp://www.naval-technology.com/projects/lafayette/index.html#lafayette5) to make it stealthier would have cost too much, I was informed by one officer.

      No doubt it was a plan to retain as many things to paint as possible :D.

      Of course, in thier roles, it is handy to have some radar signature to avoid being a collision risk or snagging risk for fishing gear.
      Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. Margaret Mead

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      • #4
        The US Coastguards plans for the future of their fleet are outlined Here . Nothing too revolutionary,apart fron the 2 heli hangar and a rear ramp to recover boats at sea...


        National Security Cutter

        Length 421 FT
        Displacement 3,886 LT
        Max Speed 29.1 KTS
        Endurance 60 Days
        Range 12,000 NM
        Propulsion CODAG, 1 Gas Turbine, 2 Diesels / Bow Thruster


        Offshore Patrol Cutter

        Length 341 FT
        Displacement 2,921 LT
        Max Speed 23.2 KTS
        Endurance 45 Days
        Range 9,000 NM
        Propulsion 2 Diesels / Bow Thruster

        Gallery


        Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

        Comment


        • #5
          Worth noting that the larger vessel is equipped with the same single point RIB Launcher as both P50 Class


          Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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          • #6
            Yea, Goldie, and the smaller one is almost twice the displacement of a P50 class.These are big ships by NS standards.
            "We will hold out until our last bullet is spent. Could do with some whiskey"
            Radio transmission, siege of Jadotville DR Congo. September 1961.
            Illegitimi non carborundum

            Comment


            • #7
              Ship technology had moved on greatly since the current fleet were built. Even the more modern ships in the fleet have relatively traditional designs. Propulsion methods have changed dramatically. The Big Diesel Engine,linked to a fixed or variable pitch propellor is becoming the exception on modern vessels,being replaced instead by smaller engines(in more convenient spaces) driving Large electric motors which drive the propellor. These can be located within the hull,or in Pods,like the Queen Mary 2. Hull design also had changed,with the realisation in North atlantic waters that the weather is getting progressively worse,and it is no longer reasonable to expect crew to carry out duties on an exposed pitching deck.(was it ever reasonable?)
              Weaponry and sensor fit are replacing the need for a man to go fore'ad to operate a weapon,or keep watch on an exposed bridge wing with a pair of binoculars. Instead electrically operated magnification units,suitable for use by day or night(similar to FLIR) can be mounted high up on the mast,increasing the distance to the visual horizon,and can be linked directly to the remotely operated automatically loaded weapon. The OTO Melara has this system,but it can be utilised for any calibre weapon,from 7.62mm upwards.
              Even the boarding boats will change. The RIB is a great design,but the engines can be replaced with an Inboard diesel,reducing the need to store 2 types of fuel on board ship, and also removing the fire risk associated with the storage of petrol. Having engines capable of running when swamped is also a useful addition.

              Nothing new there really,just some recent technology that should find its way onto the next generation of Naval vessel. Whenever that will be.
              Fail to prepare....prepare to FAIL!

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              • #8
                I don't think any sensor can replace Eyeball Mk1 as alookout......****ing hated the job but was acutely aware how important it was given the limitations of navigation radar.

                Next point.........the picture of that cutter taking a RIB up the arse is agreat idea...if your patrol area is like a duck pond.

                Obviously the guy who designed it has never sat in a searider in 35ft swells 200 miles out into the atlantic at night......it would be like trying to park a car in a garrage after two bottles of vodka.

                Recovery is iffy enough at the best of times but now you want me to park a boat ...through the ships wash.......in rough weather ...in a hole in ships stern.....and not wreck anything........Obviously some **** who has never even seen the ocean dreamt this one up.

                Thats neary as bad as trying to land a small helicopter on a handkerchief sized deck that moves........eh! that sound familiar!
                Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

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                • #9
                  Its worth Mentioning that the USCG has selected the 57mm Bofors L70 to arm its new generation of Larger cutters,which in the past have been armed with the 76mm OTO Melara.United Defence also produce this weapon.
                  These are already fitted to Canadian Naval Vessels.
                  This is the same gun fitted to L.E. Eithne,albeit in a more modern "stealthy" turret.


                  More info on Bofors Naval Guns


                  Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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                  • #10
                    xxxxx
                    Last edited by lordinajamjar; 22 November 2004, 15:05.

                    "When you arise in the morning, think of what a precious privilege it is to be alive - to breathe, to think, to enjoy, to love."


                    Marcus Aurelius Roman Emperor (161 to 180 A.D.)

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                    • #11
                      Much of the older vessels mentioned are not what you could call operational,such as buoy tenders,tugs etc. One has to consider that the time spent at sea by irish vessels far exceeds that of its counterparts from other countries,generating greater wear and tear,and shortening the useful life of the vessel.

                      Good link though..Leave it with me...


                      Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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                      • #12
                        xxxxx
                        Last edited by lordinajamjar; 22 November 2004, 15:05.

                        "When you arise in the morning, think of what a precious privilege it is to be alive - to breathe, to think, to enjoy, to love."


                        Marcus Aurelius Roman Emperor (161 to 180 A.D.)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The USCG is currently in the process of replacing all its war built Buoy tenders,with the Last of these,Acacia(WLB 406) due to be retired before the end of the year. Most of the older vessels work in the relatively sheltered waters of the Great lakes(which are similar in size to the Irish sea). The vessels operating in the Atlantic and Pacific waters are much younger.
                          Fail to prepare....prepare to FAIL!

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                          • #14
                            In New Zealand, the Authorities there have produced a major plan for the future of their Naval operations. Makes impressive reading,combined with the Commitment of their government to put $500m towards updating their small fleet.
                            http://www.navy.mil.nz/pdfs/strategi...n%20@23aug.pdf


                            Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Navy Future

                              Hi there im new to this forum but have been intrested in the irish navy for a while. I would like to ask members how they think the Irish Navy will develop over the next ten years.

                              For example more co-operation with the Air force and the ability to more craft to land on ships

                              More firepower on ships and the ability to deliver heavier payloads

                              More specialist vessels such as mine laying and clearing

                              One question Im 15 yrs old and want to join the Defence Forces but im from Derry....would i get a hard time?
                              someboyfromderry

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