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  • ancientmariner
    replied
    Originally posted by DeV View Post
    Interesting processing of data and the big sell. It would be beneficial if we could down load imagery to our centre at Haulbowline. From a legal point of view evidence would have to have a continuous hand holding chain to satisfy our courts evidential requirements. The people at EMSA would have to give evidence!!

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  • DeV
    replied
    https://youtu.be/egPmIUrEuXQ

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  • ancientmariner
    replied
    Originally posted by DeV View Post
    However there is always a hole in the bucket as MASUR activity is pursuant to National Laws and Regulations.

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  • DeV
    replied
    Not forgetting the European aspect
    https://www.eda.europa.eu/what-we-do...lance-(marsur)

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  • pym
    replied


    And now miniature synthetic aperture radar constellations are a thing.

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  • pym
    replied
    Originally posted by ancientmariner View Post
    You would need a multiplicity of satellites given that some systems are orbiting at 700/800 km every 100 minutes, while the estimated , horizon to horizon time is 8 minutes ( 27,000 kmph). A known Leo system has 22 satellites, I think Airbus mentions 4, anyway 8 hour delays for tasking seems forever. The US Navy Int satellites are at much higher altitudes of 1045km to 1150km range and their multi purpose communications streams , to and from stations meets their evolving purposes. Our involvement might be just RD for the Earth Station at Midleton while they find their feet and customers. In the meantime join NATO and hold hands on all systems.
    The US uses a range of different satellites and their orbit reflects their mission - the US Naval Ocean Surveillance System uses SIGINT satellites that vacuum up RF and through triangulation/multilateration are able to pinpoint any emitter on the ocean. They orbit at 1000km+ altititude because RF is line of sight and the more of the earth they can see, the better, there's no penalty.

    However the US also uses the LACROSSE series of synthetic aperture radar satellites, similar to SAR Lupe/TerraSAR - there are 2/3 operational at the moment and they all orbit at an altitude of approximately 600-750km.

    The reason seems simple enough - resolution. If they were higher, the penalty would be reduced radar imagery resolution.

    And yes the US does operate some geosynchronous intel satellites, but these are also SIGINT and they're... well they tend to park next to civilian comms satellites and have antennas of 100m or more in diameter. Totally different beasts compared to synthetic aperture radar satellites.

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  • ancientmariner
    replied
    LEO systems

    Originally posted by pym View Post
    They aren't geostationary, most optical/radar reconnaissance satellites operate in a low earth polar orbit



    The plan is to use data from multiple satellite systems, there will always be some kind of delay but having 3-4 systems to pick from will minimise it.
    You would need a multiplicity of satellites given that some systems are orbiting at 700/800 km every 100 minutes, while the estimated , horizon to horizon time is 8 minutes ( 27,000 kmph). A known Leo system has 22 satellites, I think Airbus mentions 4, anyway 8 hour delays for tasking seems forever. The US Navy Int satellites are at much higher altitudes of 1045km to 1150km range and their multi purpose communications streams , to and from stations meets their evolving purposes. Our involvement might be just RD for the Earth Station at Midleton while they find their feet and customers. In the meantime join NATO and hold hands on all systems.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tempest
    replied
    Yeah, just realised there was a date issue as it also mentioned Eithne was in the Med!

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  • Sparky42
    replied
    Originally posted by Tempest View Post
    In the press release quoted by Pym and repeated below the figure of an 8 ship fleet is mentioned, hopefully not a sign of slippage from the 9 promised?

    http://nationalspacecentre.eu/naval-contract/
    [/QUOTE]
    Ah that's dated July last year, since P64 was only announced this year I wouldn't read anything into it.

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  • Tempest
    replied
    In the press release quoted by Pym and repeated below the figure of an 8 ship fleet is mentioned, hopefully not a sign of slippage from the 9 promised?

    http://nationalspacecentre.eu/naval-contract/[/QUOTE]

    Leave a comment:


  • pym
    replied
    Originally posted by ancientmariner View Post
    Great possibilities to track ships particularly non-compliant AIS targets. The real time usable data is dependent on the immediacy or continuity of satellite data. Airbus blurb refers to an 8 hour window for tasking. What does that mean , if you want to use data for long range targeting say from 150kms? If the satellites are geostationary in our region why any delay? Hope all of this leads to somewhere useful and usable.
    They aren't geostationary, most optical/radar reconnaissance satellites operate in a low earth polar orbit



    The plan is to use data from multiple satellite systems, there will always be some kind of delay but having 3-4 systems to pick from will minimise it.

    Leave a comment:


  • ancientmariner
    replied
    Airbus satellite technology? Elfordstown

    Originally posted by na grohmití View Post
    A former site member was involved in its upgrade. It is a nice landmark to be living near. Not Quite Parkes or Goldstone, but its ours.
    Great possibilities to track ships particularly non-compliant AIS targets. The real time usable data is dependent on the immediacy or continuity of satellite data. Airbus blurb refers to an 8 hour window for tasking. What does that mean , if you want to use data for long range targeting say from 150kms? If the satellites are geostationary in our region why any delay? Hope all of this leads to somewhere useful and usable.

    Leave a comment:


  • na grohmiti
    replied
    A former site member was involved in its upgrade. It is a nice landmark to be living near. Not Quite Parkes or Goldstone, but its ours.

    Leave a comment:


  • pym
    started a topic Anistiamo

    Anistiamo

    How to effectively monitor our Atlantic waters crops up every so often, including the possibility of using satellites etc.

    Found this page earlier regarding the ANISTIAMO Project:

    http://anistiamo.org/node/2

    Of real note - is that it will use (uses?) the earth station in Elfordstown and does not rely on AIS alone, it will utilise a number of radar observation satellites. It's a very impressive capability leap. Sort of like going from secondary air surveillance radar to an E-3 Sentry...

    Overlay the radar returns with AIS signals, and say hello to the vessels of interest...

    An idea of the capabilities:

    http://www.intelligence-airbusds.com...ction-tracking

    As an aside, the Elfordstown earth station is now also being use as the downlink for NS satellite comms. Considering the site lay dormant for around a decade, it's great to see it back like this and becoming a strategic piece of national infrastructure again

    http://nationalspacecentre.eu/naval-contract/
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